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in2herbs

Profile Information

Gender: Female
Home country: USA
Current location: AZ
Member since: Sat Jun 23, 2018, 02:32 PM
Number of posts: 1,933

Journal Archives

Rattlesnakes are not pets but I don't know where to post my question. I have never shot a

rattlesnake. Instead I capture and relocate them about 2 miles up the road. However, I have captured 5 in less than two months. I think it's time for some culling but I don't own a gun so I need some advice. All I want is a gun that I can load snake shot into and shoot the target from 10 or more feet away. I want it lightweight and small in size, if that's possible. If anyone out there can recommend the type of gun and ammo I would appreciate it.

CLIMATE CHANGE CAUSING CHEMICAL CHANGE?

I donít have a college degree with which to render me a credible resource on this topic so I am reaching out to anyone on DU that is willing to share information known to them. Often times, knowledge gained from others is greater than knowledge gained from a book.

Taking care of horses is a 24/7/365 job, one which I have been doing for 30+ years. While I canít discuss climate change with scientists I know that it is real because I see the changes in our environment that are occurring now and the changes that have occurred leading up to this now. For example, and the purpose of this post, thirty years ago I used two or three 16-oz cans of fly spray per fly season for about 10 horses, applying a light application once per day. At that time the summer heat and fly season was generally June through August. The summer heat and fly season now is generally April through November.

Thus far, during this 2021 heat/fly season, I have used in excess of six GALLONS of fly spray for 3 horses. I began to wonder whether this increasingly excessive amount of fly spray was due to the ineffectiveness of the chemicals in the fly spray once the outside temperature reaches or exceeds a certain temperature, and set about doing some research. Turns out there are scientists who believe this, as well.

According to one study, fly sprays containing pyrethrins tested against mosquitos is most effective up to 32 degrees Celsius (89.6 F) and practically ineffective against mosquitos at 34 degrees Celsius (93.2 F) and above. The average first 90-degree day in Phoenix is March 31. This year (2021), the temperature reached 95 degrees on that day and has been steadily climbing. According to that study and temperature records, where I live, the use of fly sprays (containing pyrethrins) would be ineffective in the fight against mosquitos and mosquito-caused West Nile virus during the entire heat/fly season.

I donít remember there being an issue with horses and culicoides (no-see-ums) thirty years ago here in the Southwest. However, for the past fifteen years or so the no-see-um season has become an annual springtime event --- until 2020. In 2020 the culicoides made their appearance in mid-September, likely because the temperatures were still above 105 F. Culicoides donít care if they bite human or animal and each bite produces a histamine reaction. There can be dozens of bites on a horseís body at one time. Hence the attempt with fly spray to keep the culicoides at bay.

I donít mind spending money on my horses to make them comfortable, but this new-found knowledge that some (or all) of the chemical ingredients in fly sprays become ineffective above a certain temperature must be known to fly spray manufacturers, yet these corporations are silent about this issue. Is corporate profit the reason for their silence? A one-gallon jug of fly spray in my area is $50 plus tax.

Years ago I tried a feed-thru fly insecticide for horses. I wonder if it wasnít effective because a healthy horseís internal temperature is generally 95 degrees and above?

In my research I also read a study on cats and fleas. A common ingredient in these sprays is Piperonyl butoxide. The temperature range for this chemical is most effective up to 26 degrees Celsius (78.8 F) and is rendered essentially ineffective at 35 degrees Celsius (95 F) and above.

The scientists authoring the studies I read all warned that climate change is causing a negative effect globally on the insecticides and pesticides used to control insects, and my personal experience agrees. Is anyone else living in areas with warming summer seasons experiencing a lack of efficiency with any fly sprays they are using? Clearly climate change affects everything. While each of us is adapting individually to these changes, we must continue to push our elected representatives --- at all levels of government, to recognize this and make it a top priority to reverse it now, not later.

I have tried the natural fly sprays but found that on our hot days of summer they are just as ineffective as sprays containing chemicals. Years ago I fed my trail horse garlic for fly control. I donít remember how effective the garlic was for fly control, I only remember meeting other riders on the trail saying he smelled like an Italian restaurant. There is one horse on property who refuses to wear a fly mask and, of course, flies and other insects gravitate towards his eyes and ears. In an attempt to provide him relief I combine zinc ointment and lavender oil which I apply daily around his eyes (not ears). This has been 95+% effective in repelling flies around his eyes.

Iíd like to know if you are experiencing increasing ineffectiveness using fly spray on hot summer days and read what your suggestions are for anything that you think can be substituted for chemical fly control.


X-posted in Home & Family/Pets (groups)
X-posted in Environment & Energy (groups)

CLIMATE CHANGE CAUSING CHEMICAL CHANGE?

I donít have a college degree with which to render me a credible resource on this topic so I am reaching out to anyone on DU that is willing to share information known to them. Often times, knowledge gained from others is greater than knowledge gained from a book.

Taking care of horses is a 24/7/365 job, one which I have been doing for 30+ years. While I canít discuss climate change with scientists I know that it is real because I see the changes in our environment that are occurring now and the changes that have occurred leading up to this now. For example, and the purpose of this post, thirty years ago I used two or three 16-oz cans of fly spray per fly season for about 10 horses, applying a light application once per day. At that time the summer heat and fly season was generally June through August. The summer heat and fly season now is generally April through November.

Thus far, during this 2021 heat/fly season, I have used in excess of six GALLONS of fly spray for 3 horses. I began to wonder whether this increasingly excessive amount of fly spray was due to the ineffectiveness of the chemicals in the fly spray once the outside temperature reaches or exceeds a certain temperature, and set about doing some research. Turns out there are scientists who believe this, as well.

According to one study, fly sprays containing pyrethrins tested against mosquitos is most effective up to 32 degrees Celsius (89.6 F) and practically ineffective against mosquitos at 34 degrees Celsius (93.2 F) and above. The average first 90-degree day in Phoenix is March 31. This year (2021), the temperature reached 95 degrees on that day and has been steadily climbing. According to that study and temperature records, where I live, the use of fly sprays (containing pyrethrins) would be ineffective in the fight against mosquitos and mosquito-caused West Nile virus during the entire heat/fly season.

I donít remember there being an issue with horses and culicoides (no-see-ums) thirty years ago here in the Southwest. However, for the past fifteen years or so the no-see-um season has become an annual springtime event --- until 2020. In 2020 the culicoides made their appearance in mid-September, likely because the temperatures were still above 105 F. Culicoides donít care if they bite human or animal and each bite produces a histamine reaction. There can be dozens of bites on a horseís body at one time. Hence the attempt with fly spray to keep the culicoides at bay.

I donít mind spending money on my horses to make them comfortable, but this new-found knowledge that some (or all) of the chemical ingredients in fly sprays become ineffective above a certain temperature must be known to fly spray manufacturers, yet these corporations are silent about this issue. Is corporate profit the reason for their silence? A one-gallon jug of fly spray in my area is $50 plus tax.

Years ago I tried a feed-thru fly insecticide for horses. I wonder if it wasnít effective because a healthy horseís internal temperature is generally 95 degrees and above?

In my research I also read a study on cats and fleas. A common ingredient in these sprays is Piperonyl butoxide. The temperature range for this chemical is most effective up to 26 degrees Celsius (78.8 F) and is rendered essentially ineffective at 35 degrees Celsius (95 F) and above.

The scientists authoring the studies I read all warned that climate change is causing a negative effect globally on the insecticides and pesticides used to control insects, and my personal experience agrees. Is anyone else living in areas with warming summer seasons experiencing a lack of efficiency with any fly sprays they are using? Clearly climate change affects everything. While each of us is adapting individually to these changes, we must continue to push our elected representatives --- at all levels of government, to recognize this and make it a top priority to reverse it now, not later.

I have tried the natural fly sprays but found that on our hot days of summer they are just as ineffective as sprays containing chemicals. Years ago I fed my trail horse garlic for fly control. I donít remember how effective the garlic was for fly control, I only remember meeting other riders on the trail saying he smelled like an Italian restaurant. There is one horse on property who refuses to wear a fly mask and, of course, flies and other insects gravitate towards his eyes and ears. In an attempt to provide him relief I combine zinc ointment and lavender oil which I apply daily around his eyes (not ears). This has been 95+% effective in repelling flies around his eyes.

Iíd like to know if you are experiencing increasing ineffectiveness using fly spray on hot summer days and read what your suggestions are for anything that you think can be substituted for chemical fly control.


X-posted in Home & Family/Pets (groups)
X-posted in Environment & Energy (groups)

I hope it's OK to post this here:

Cave Creek, AZ is a horse town and the residents here are being tested. The news of our 2,000+ acre fire two weeks ago didnít make it beyond the local the news, but 40 horses were evacuate and 60 families. The mandatory evac order lasted 3 days. It is reported (unconfirmed by me) that the fire started because of a spark from a weed whacker. No horses, other pets, lives or structures were lost. Due to circumstances with my animals I did not evacuate.

Around noon on Saturday, May 30th another fire broke out because someone was welding pipe (this is what the cop told me when he came to the house to see if I was going to evacuate for this fire). Saturday was an extreme weather alert day and high wind advisory ---perfect day to weld!!!!

This fire is far more dangerous than the one two weeks ago. My phone battery was dead cuz the power was off from Saturday about 1 pm till 10:30 Sun night. Power poles burned and live wires were on the ground till APS could arrive. Two horses were electrocuted by the live wires before they could be rescued. But the sheriffís department and a group of horse owners are doing a great job --- that is not a snark comment. I live at the end of town (where the fire was heading) and several trucks and horse trailers stopped to ask if I wanted the horses evacuated. One horse was evacuated, the others stayed here on property with me. Their arthritic issues prevent them from stepping up into a trailer. So I brought out the hoses and was prepared to keep them safe in the arena.


Sat. night I sat on my back porch watching one of the houses on the next street over burn down. I have heard that 14 houses have burned (unconfirmed, it may be more.) In the afternoon, when I saw a plume of black smoke billowing up the road towards my home and animals the shit got real. Then suddenly, like on a conveyor belt, for ten minutes the slurry planes and helicopters carrying water buckets turned and flew incredibly low over my barn to drop their loads on the plume of black smoke heading my way. If they had not gotten this portion under control there was no hope of controlling any part of the fire. Kudos again to the fire crews.
The fire and smoke was pretty much out by Sun night so I was surprised when I saw a huge plume of fresh black smoke in the direction of the town when I took my one dog for a walk this AM (Monday). My phoneís battery had recharged and calls from friends started coming in on my walk Ė the feed store in town was on fire Ė arson. This feed store is a building thatís older than the town so it was of historical importance. It is unconfirmed but the news I am hearing is that the dark web was telling people to come to Cave Creek to loot and arson and I heard about an hour ago that they caught two people who started the fire and that theyíre connected to Antifa (not confirmed by me.)

Cave Creek residents have a FB page. I think itís Cave Creek Infamous Blog in case you want to follow. I donít go on FB.


There are not enough words to express the gratitude to be given the fire and air emergency crews and APS for their work.
Just wanting to let you know whatís going on. Iím off to fix some spaghetti cuz you can eat it hot or cold. I expect there will be more power shortages before this is over and our future holds more extreme heat days. I have set the AC for 74 degrees cuz I want the house to be cooled down in the event of another power shortage. The house has been over 85 degrees without the AC power to cool it. The evac order started Saturday and I hear will remain in effect for another 72 hours from today. Peopleís businesses are destroyed. One business owner could not pay the insurance due to the lack of business due to COVID and his inventory burned to the ground.

The priority in Cave Creek is our horses and other animals. Cave Creek may be a politically red town but we donít hunker to anyone or anything threatening our animals.

Send good vibes and keep us in your thoughts.

Life goes in circles. The last time I owned any cat was more than 20 years ago. In fact, I owned

4 at the same time. Well, a few months ago a stray cat birthed her 6 kittens in my barn. I was able to trap all of them and transferred them to a great cat rescue. Three of the kittens have been adopted but grown cats are not what people are looking for so I told the cat rescue lady that I'd take the momma cat after the kittens were weaned and she was fixed, which I paid for. That has occurred so as of today I am again a cat owner. A tabby. However, the momma was really attached to one specific kitten so when I went to pick up the momma she asked if I'd take the baby to help with their transition, promising that she'd take the baby back if it didn't work out. So I am the owner of a cat and a kitten. The momma is in hiding in the upstairs room, and the baby is hiding under the dresser in the same room. I hope they can find their food and litter box on their own. Momma was a good barn mouser but those days are over. She'll be an inside cat. I go into the room every hour for a few minutes and just sit quietly.

With all the fear and hate in the world under trump I swore to myself I wasn't going to let any animal be killed if I was able to rescue it and provide it a good home.

Being a stray - not feral - she'll need time to acclimate cuz right now her favorite thing to do is hiss and swat. But she better hurry cuz I've also got 2 dogs. Husband does not yet know about the kitten!

Don't know how to post pics but just wanted to share my good news.

Bentonite clay for COVID-19??

I've used this in the past to "detox" my horses but had no idea it had a suggested use for fighting COVID-19. Before going on line to order more I updated my research. According to research, including NIH studies, Bentonite clay is a treatment for diahrrea induced by the coronavirus and the respiratory infections caused by the coronavirus. I'm not going to post a lot of info -- merely putting this out there as an alternative and something to have on hand if anyone experiences these symptoms with the coronavirus. My cost was $25 for a pound and humans use is 1 tsp/day. My caveat is to make sure you purchase calcium bentonite clay food grade. There are sodium BC products on the market but sodium BC is mostly for industrial use.

BC is also known as montmorillonite clay, which is a finely ground clay, kaolin clay, which is a finer ground clay.

Lastly, while the site info is from 2016 (I think) the FDA says not to purchase the brands "Best Bentonite Clay" from Guthrie, OK or "Bentonite Me Baby" by Alikay Naturals, although I went on their site and it is no longer listed.

When I've used BC in the past I alternated between French Green Clay and BC.

Do your own research and make sure, if you're on other meds, that you follow the guidelines: 2 hours before or after RX or 1 hour before meal.

Here is one of the many links I went to in my research: https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0378113598002417?via%3Dihub

Maybe others have tried this or something similar

but I decided to try to jazz up the taste of the Quorn meatless roast. I thawed it and then made four slices lengthwise in the roast, spread the slices apart, added Brie cheese and dried cranberries, tied it together, covered with foil, and baked according to directions. Itís good but I donít think that Brie adds enough flavor variety. Without going super-spicy does anyone have any suggestions for a cheese?

Thanks.

Just checked my DU mail. I got two hearts --- thank you two and all!

This is not really a discussion, but as a Pets group I couldn't find any other place on

DU to post this news. I have no links.

Last night, on the local news, it was reported that 14 wild horses had been shot in Heber, AZ. Intentionally. Some were foals.

It is hard to concentrate on forgiving people when they show they are monsters.

There are no clues.

Are you sure you're getting enough iodine?

The addition of iodine in table salt began in the US in the early 1920s to help decrease the occurrence of goiters, or swelling of the thyroid gland. Knowing the importance of iodine in the diet, for more than 30 years I have added 2 oz. of iodized table salt daily to the wet feed of each horse on my property. I have purchased this iodized table salt in 25# bags at the local bulk food grocery store that caters to the commercial and restaurant businesses. During the past year or so, however, the store has carried only evaporated salt. Not knowing what evaporated salt was I did some research and learned that evaporated salt does not contain iodine (unless it is specifically added and labeled as such.)

Iodine is a mineral/electrolyte needed by humans and animals. Restaurants and manufacturers of commercially-prepared foods (generally) use only evaporated salt in their baking/manufacturing process. So, if your required daily amount of iodine is not in the restaurant food you eat, is not in the salt of commercially-prepared food you consume, and you do not salt your food with the required daily amount of iodized salt or eat iodine-rich foods, what is the source of your iodine? Just because your consuming sodium does not mean you are consuming iodine.

To prevent thyroid disease and help maintain a normal electrolyte balance read the label to be sure youíre getting iodine, or consume foods that naturally contain iodine. If your doctor tells you to lower your salt intake because of high blood pressure ask him or her how to go about supplementing with iodine so you donít end up with thyroid disease.
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