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friendly_iconoclast

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Member since: Fri Sep 8, 2006, 12:47 PM
Number of posts: 14,457

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CBC: Handgun ban would have 'no impact,' police union head warns

https://www.cbc.ca/news/politics/handgun-ban-blair-toronto-police-union-1.4807778

"There's no way in my world or any world I know that this would have an impact on somebody who's going to go out and buy an illegal gun and use it to kill another person or shoot another person," Mike McCormack, the president of the Toronto Police Association, said Friday...

...The intention is noble, he added, but it's "A notional gesture at best."

Instead, McCormack would rather see more resources poured into policing and social services.

He said his years of experience in policing have taught him something about gun crime — individuals who steal, sell or use guns illegally are already facing mountains of jail time, so they're unfazed by one more law that condemns their actions...


Posted by friendly_iconoclast | Mon Sep 3, 2018, 05:10 PM (0 replies)

After court order, 3D-printed gun pioneer now sells pay-what-you-want CAD files

https://arstechnica.com/tech-policy/2018/08/in-defiance-of-court-order-3d-printed-gun-pioneer-starts-selling-cad-files/


AUSTIN, Texas—During what he called his first ever press conference, Defense Distributed founder Cody Wilson announced Tuesday that he would continue to comply with a federal court order forbidding him from internationally publishing CAD files of firearms. Wilson said he would also begin selling copies of his 3D-printed gun files for a "suggested price" of $10 each.

The files, crucially, will be transmitted to customers "on a DD-branded flash drive" in the United States. Wilson also mentioned looking into customer email and secure download links...

...On Monday, Judge Lasnik ordered that the files must stay offline in order to comply with American export law.

By selling them only to people in the United States, Wilson and Defense Distributed have found a way to still comply with the judge's order...


Some of the more relevant comments at the link:

Wilson is in compliance with the order, which says nothing about his ability to sell or distribute within the US.


-Bet the file will be on TPB* within a matter of days.

--The plans have been on TPB for months, if not years already.

---Haaah! I had a feeling this was a dog and pony show for public and politicians. And that the reality was these files have been available online as of about 5 minutes after someone finalized them.


*TPB= The Pirate Bay, a notorious (and so far unstoppable) torrent site

Indeed, this court order is virtue signaling of the first water and will undoubtedly deter DIY gun making about as
effectively as Operation Pipe Dreams 'deterred' cannabis use:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Operation_Pipe_Dreams


Operation Pipe Dreams
From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Operation Pipe Dreams was the code-name for a U.S. nationwide investigation in 2003 targeting businesses selling drug paraphernalia, mostly marijuana pipes and bongs, under a little-used statute (21 U.S.C. § 863(a)). Due to the reluctance of state law-enforcement agencies to contribute resources to the operation, most cases were filed in Iowa and Pennsylvania, taking advantage of the statute's prohibition on the use of "the mails or any other facility of interstate commerce to transport drug paraphernalia."[1]

Hundreds of businesses and homes were raided as a result of Operation Pipe Dreams.[2] Fifty five people were named in indictments and charged with trafficking of illegal drug paraphernalia. While 54 of the 55 individuals charged were sentenced to fines and home detentions, actor Tommy Chong was sentenced September 11, 2003, to 9 months in a federal prison, a fine of $20,000, forfeiture of $103,000, and a year of probation. Chong was charged for his part in financing and promoting Chong Glass Works/Nice Dreams, California-based companies started by his son Paris. Unlike most shops selling bongs, Nice Dreams specialized in selling high-end bongs as collectible works of art. The Chong Glass Works employed 25 glass blowers who were paid $30/hour to produce 100 pipes a day.

Nice Dreams had a policy in place for refusing to sell bongs to states where the statute was being enforced. Federal agents, disguised as head-shop owners, pressured Paris Chong to sell them his pipes and deliver them through the mail to a fictitious shop in the Pittsburgh suburb of Beaver Falls, Pennsylvania. When Paris persistently refused, agents went to the place of business in person and ordered a massive quantity of out of stock merchandise. The merchandise was crafted but not picked up and sat idle in the warehouse as federal agents again pressured Paris to ship it. To get the merchandise out of his warehouse, Paris eventually agreed to ship it. In a Plea bargain, Chong agreed to plead guilty to one count of conspiracy to distribute drug paraphernalia in exchange for non-prosecution of his wife, Shelby, and his son, Paris. Federal Prosecution admitted to being harsher on Chong in retaliation, citing Chong's movies as trivializing "law enforcement efforts to combat drug trafficking and use."[3]

The estimated cost of Operation Pipe Dreams was over $12 million and included the resources of 2,000 law enforcement officers.
Posted by friendly_iconoclast | Wed Aug 29, 2018, 10:41 PM (2 replies)

Forbes: To Catch A Robber, The FBI Attempted An Unprecedented Grab For Google Location Data

Repost from Civil Liberties Group:

https://www.democraticunderground.com/11682381


https://www.forbes.com/sites/thomasbrewster/2018/08/15/to-catch-a-robber-the-fbi-attempted-an-unprecendeted-grab-for-google-location-data/#cfa895a741d0


Back in March, as it investigated a spate of armed robberies across Portland, Maine, the FBI made an astonishing, unprecedented request of Google. The feds wanted the tech giant to find all users of its services who’d been within the vicinity of at least two of nine of those robberies. They limited the search to within 30-minute timeframes around when the crimes were committed. But the request covered a total space of 45 hectares and could’ve included anyone with an Android or iPhone using Google’s tools, not just the suspect.

The FBI then demanded a lot of personal information on affected users, including their full names and addresses, as well as their Google account activity. The feds also wanted all affected users’ historical locations. According to court records, while Google didn’t provide the information, the cops still found their suspect in the end.

Outside of concerns around government overreach, the FBI’s remarkable attempt to force Google to assist in its investigation will likely worry all who were disturbed by an Associated Press investigation published on Monday that claimed Google continued to track people even when they turned location features off. The court warrants unearthed by Forbes indicate some at the FBI believe they have a right to that location data too, even if it belongs to innocents who might be unwittingly caught up in invasive government surveillance. And the government feels such fishing expeditions are permissable; it issued the warrant on Google without knowing whether or not the suspect used an Android device or any of the company services at all....

...Despite limiting the search to users who’d been at two of the locations within certain timeframes, Medvin said the government didn’t go far enough. “This is a general search, which is prohibited under our Constitution. It is not particularized, a legal prerequisite to obtain a warrant under U.S. law,” she said. “The Supreme Court explained that the purpose of the particularity requirement is to make general searches impossible and to prevent ‘a general, exploratory rummaging.’


This is nothing more or less than a 'writ of assistance', without any probable cause
Posted by friendly_iconoclast | Thu Aug 16, 2018, 04:42 PM (4 replies)

Forbes: To Catch A Robber, The FBI Attempted An Unprecedented Grab For Google Location Data

https://www.forbes.com/sites/thomasbrewster/2018/08/15/to-catch-a-robber-the-fbi-attempted-an-unprecendeted-grab-for-google-location-data/#cfa895a741d0


Back in March, as it investigated a spate of armed robberies across Portland, Maine, the FBI made an astonishing, unprecedented request of Google. The feds wanted the tech giant to find all users of its services who’d been within the vicinity of at least two of nine of those robberies. They limited the search to within 30-minute timeframes around when the crimes were committed. But the request covered a total space of 45 hectares and could’ve included anyone with an Android or iPhone using Google’s tools, not just the suspect.

The FBI then demanded a lot of personal information on affected users, including their full names and addresses, as well as their Google account activity. The feds also wanted all affected users’ historical locations. According to court records, while Google didn’t provide the information, the cops still found their suspect in the end.

Outside of concerns around government overreach, the FBI’s remarkable attempt to force Google to assist in its investigation will likely worry all who were disturbed by an Associated Press investigation published on Monday that claimed Google continued to track people even when they turned location features off. The court warrants unearthed by Forbes indicate some at the FBI believe they have a right to that location data too, even if it belongs to innocents who might be unwittingly caught up in invasive government surveillance. And the government feels such fishing expeditions are permissable; it issued the warrant on Google without knowing whether or not the suspect used an Android device or any of the company services at all....

...Despite limiting the search to users who’d been at two of the locations within certain timeframes, Medvin said the government didn’t go far enough. “This is a general search, which is prohibited under our Constitution. It is not particularized, a legal prerequisite to obtain a warrant under U.S. law,” she said. “The Supreme Court explained that the purpose of the particularity requirement is to make general searches impossible and to prevent ‘a general, exploratory rummaging.’


This is nothing more or less than a 'writ of assistance', without any probable cause
Posted by friendly_iconoclast | Thu Aug 16, 2018, 04:30 PM (1 replies)

And the moral panic slogs on: "3D-printed guns lead Broward libraries to suspend printers' use"

http://www.sun-sentinel.com/local/broward/fl-sb-broward-shelves-library-3d-printers-indefinitely-20180813-story.html#


If you’re looking to print out something in 3-D, don’t bother going to a Broward County library because theirs have been temporarily shelved over concerns they could be used to make a gun or other dangerous weapons.

Broward libraries took their 3-D printers out of circulation Monday to come up with policies about what the printers can be used for. Officials do not know how long the printers will be unavailable to the public.

“I’m concerned with any weapon that could be printed on a 3-D printer,” Broward Library Director Kelvin Watson said. “It’s about all weapons and anything that could be printed to harm other customers and staff … especially in light of what happened last week at the
Main Library.”

On Aug. 7, a man was shot outside the Main Library in downtown Fort Lauderdale near the homeless tent encampment. The man’s injuries were not life-threatening, officials said.


Following that 'logic', BPL better quit providing tools:

http://www.broward.org/Library/Pages/CreationStation.aspx

C​reation Station Lab
Makerspace/Gadget Lab Audio/Video Production • Electronics Kits • Arts & Crafts • Computer Programming​ • Virtual Reality Equipment
Looking for somewhere to unleash your creativity and ideas? We have just the place. Nestled in downtown Fort Lauderdale, is a makerspace/gadget lab on the first floor of the Main Library. It's the first free community center in Broward equipped with tools such as state-of-the-art computers and gadgets as well as public access to the latest virtual reality equipment.​​

Lab hours: Monday, Thursday-Saturday: 10AM-6PM; Tuesday-Wednesday: Noon-8PM; Sunday: Closed
Creation Station Lab Events​

Additional Labs
One space just isn't enough. Concentrating on specific creative areas, two other Broward County Libraries are available makerspaces. The Northwest Regional Library in Coral Springs features equipment/space for hands-on projects and a large, open space with work tables.


https://www.google.com/search?q=homemade+gun+videos&ie=utf-8&oe=utf-8

Shades of Operation Pipe Dreams:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Operation_Pipe_Dreams

Operation Pipe Dreams was the code-name for a U.S. nationwide investigation in 2003 targeting businesses selling drug paraphernalia, mostly marijuana pipes and bongs, under a little-used statute (21 U.S.C. § 863(a)). Due to the reluctance of state law-enforcement agencies to contribute resources to the operation, most cases were filed in Iowa and Pennsylvania, taking advantage of the statute's prohibition on the use of "the mails or any other facility of interstate commerce to transport drug paraphernalia."[1]

Hundreds of businesses and homes were raided as a result of Operation Pipe Dreams.[2] Fifty five people were named in indictments and charged with trafficking of illegal drug paraphernalia. While 54 of the 55 individuals charged were sentenced to fines and home detentions, actor Tommy Chong was sentenced September 11, 2003, to 9 months in a federal prison, a fine of $20,000, forfeiture of $103,000, and a year of probation. Chong was charged for his part in financing and promoting Chong Glass Works/Nice Dreams, California-based companies started by his son Paris. Unlike most shops selling bongs, Nice Dreams specialized in selling high-end bongs as collectible works of art. The Chong Glass Works employed 25 glass blowers who were paid $30/hour to produce 100 pipes a day.

Nice Dreams had a policy in place for refusing to sell bongs to states where the statute was being enforced. Federal agents, disguised as head-shop owners, pressured Paris Chong to sell them his pipes and deliver them through the mail to a fictitious shop in the Pittsburgh suburb of Beaver Falls, Pennsylvania. When Paris persistently refused, agents went to the place of business in person and ordered a massive quantity of out of stock merchandise. The merchandise was crafted but not picked up and sat idle in the warehouse as federal agents again pressured Paris to ship it. To get the merchandise out of his warehouse, Paris eventually agreed to ship it. In a Plea bargain, Chong agreed to plead guilty to one count of conspiracy to distribute drug paraphernalia in exchange for non-prosecution of his wife, Shelby, and his son, Paris. Federal Prosecution admitted to being harsher on Chong in retaliation, citing Chong's movies as trivializing "law enforcement efforts to combat drug trafficking and use."[3]

The estimated cost of Operation Pipe Dreams was over $12 million and included the resources of 2,000 law enforcement officers.[1][4]
Posted by friendly_iconoclast | Thu Aug 16, 2018, 04:00 PM (16 replies)

Internet Publication of 3D Printing Files About Guns: Facts and What's at Stake

This from the Electronic Frontier Foundation

https://www.eff.org/

via the Civil Liberties group:

https://www.democraticunderground.com/11682359

https://www.eff.org/deeplinks/2018/08/internet-publication-3d-printing-files-about-guns-facts-and-whats-stake


Our government has a history of characterizing information (like encryption technology) and ideas (like socialism or Islam) as dangerous and likely to lead to violence. A free society cannot give the government unbridled discretion to make those choices, because of the systematic oppression that such a government can engage in...

...It’s dangerous for the Executive Branch to have so much control over the public’s right to share information online. Without meaningful restrictions on how and when the State Department can exercise its power, the risk of politically motivated censorship is extremely high.

In absence of laws dictating when the government can and can’t use this power, politically motivated censorship is unavoidable. As EFF argued in our amicus brief, echoing concerns raised by the Supreme Court, “Human nature creates an unacceptably high risk that excessive discretion will be used unconstitutionally, and such violations would be very difficult to prove on a case-by-case basis.” Under the same law, the government could try to bar activists from sharing instructions for treating the effects of tear gas and other chemical weapons, or researchers from spreading information about the government’s use of mass surveillance tools.

Or it could bar technologists from publishing the encryption technologies that we all use to protect ourselves from criminals online. In the 1990s, EFF successfully argued that it was unconstitutional for the government to use these export regulations to ban the online distribution of computer code used for effective encryption. Two decades later, the government has again used this unconstitutional export control regime in a way that gives it broad control over who can share information about a wide range of technologies online, with no safeguards ensuring that it doesn’t ban certain speakers for political reasons...


Or 'information on how to obtain abortions', or 'how to make misoprostol without a prescription',
or 'how to protect ones' self and loved ones from ICE'...

Don't get me wrong, Cody Wilson is a sociopathic, vile human being- but as someone once said, "Free speech is for assholes"



Posted by friendly_iconoclast | Tue Aug 7, 2018, 04:33 PM (6 replies)

Repost: "Internet Publication of 3D Printing Files About Guns: Facts and What's At Stake"

Orignally posted at the Civil Liberties group:

https://www.democraticunderground.com/11682359

https://www.eff.org/deeplinks/2018/08/internet-publication-3d-printing-files-about-guns-facts-and-whats-stake


Our government has a history of characterizing information (like encryption technology) and ideas (like socialism or Islam) as dangerous and likely to lead to violence. A free society cannot give the government unbridled discretion to make those choices, because of the systematic oppression that such a government can engage in...

...It’s dangerous for the Executive Branch to have so much control over the public’s right to share information online. Without meaningful restrictions on how and when the State Department can exercise its power, the risk of politically motivated censorship is extremely high.

In absence of laws dictating when the government can and can’t use this power, politically motivated censorship is unavoidable. As EFF argued in our amicus brief, echoing concerns raised by the Supreme Court, “Human nature creates an unacceptably high risk that excessive discretion will be used unconstitutionally, and such violations would be very difficult to prove on a case-by-case basis.” Under the same law, the government could try to bar activists from sharing instructions for treating the effects of tear gas and other chemical weapons, or researchers from spreading information about the government’s use of mass surveillance tools.

Or it could bar technologists from publishing the encryption technologies that we all use to protect ourselves from criminals online. In the 1990s, EFF successfully argued that it was unconstitutional for the government to use these export regulations to ban the online distribution of computer code used for effective encryption. Two decades later, the government has again used this unconstitutional export control regime in a way that gives it broad control over who can share information about a wide range of technologies online, with no safeguards ensuring that it doesn’t ban certain speakers for political reasons...


Or ban 'information on how to obtain abortions', or 'how to make misoprostol without a prescription',
or 'how to protect ones' self and loved ones from ICE'...

Don't get me wrong, Cody Wilson is a sociopathic, vile human being- but as someone once said, "Free speech is for assholes"



Posted by friendly_iconoclast | Tue Aug 7, 2018, 04:18 PM (0 replies)

EFF: "Internet Publication of 3D Printing Files About Guns: Facts and What's at Stake"

Orignally posted at the Civil Liberties group:

https://www.democraticunderground.com/11682359

https://www.eff.org/deeplinks/2018/08/internet-publication-3d-printing-files-about-guns-facts-and-whats-stake


Our government has a history of characterizing information (like encryption technology) and ideas (like socialism or Islam) as dangerous and likely to lead to violence. A free society cannot give the government unbridled discretion to make those choices, because of the systematic oppression that such a government can engage in...

...It’s dangerous for the Executive Branch to have so much control over the public’s right to share information online. Without meaningful restrictions on how and when the State Department can exercise its power, the risk of politically motivated censorship is extremely high.

In absence of laws dictating when the government can and can’t use this power, politically motivated censorship is unavoidable. As EFF argued in our amicus brief, echoing concerns raised by the Supreme Court, “Human nature creates an unacceptably high risk that excessive discretion will be used unconstitutionally, and such violations would be very difficult to prove on a case-by-case basis.” Under the same law, the government could try to bar activists from sharing instructions for treating the effects of tear gas and other chemical weapons, or researchers from spreading information about the government’s use of mass surveillance tools.

Or it could bar technologists from publishing the encryption technologies that we all use to protect ourselves from criminals online. In the 1990s, EFF successfully argued that it was unconstitutional for the government to use these export regulations to ban the online distribution of computer code used for effective encryption. Two decades later, the government has again used this unconstitutional export control regime in a way that gives it broad control over who can share information about a wide range of technologies online, with no safeguards ensuring that it doesn’t ban certain speakers for political reasons...


Or ban 'information on how to obtain abortions', or 'how to make misoprostol without a prescription',
or 'how to protect ones' self and loved ones from ICE'...

Don't get me wrong, Cody Wilson is a sociopathic, vile human being- but as someone once said, "Free speech is for assholes"



Posted by friendly_iconoclast | Tue Aug 7, 2018, 04:14 PM (17 replies)

Steve Daines (R) tweets photos purportedly showing him in DC while he's actually in Moscow:

Merely the latest from the party of quislings, would-be Gileadites, racists, and grifters:

https://twitter.com/SteveDaines/status/1014668830768058370

https://twitter.com/SteveDaines/status/1014681813548232705

https://twitter.com/RobertHolzer/status/1014711649205477376

Posted by friendly_iconoclast | Thu Jul 5, 2018, 04:48 PM (11 replies)

Too fucking true: "Hey Democrats, Fighting Fair Is for Suckers"

https://www.politico.com/magazine/story/2018/07/04/democrats-majority-rules-norms-trump-2020-218947


If Democrats are wise, they will embrace President Donald Trump’s demonstration that there no longer are any unwritten rules in American politics. (I’ve come to think that the key text for understanding our era is the 1997 movie Air Bud: “There’s no rule that says a dog can’t play basketball.”) Democrats should be preparing to exercise power, beginning as early as 2020, with that lesson in mind.

As we all know, Trump and the Republican Party that enables him eat norms for breakfast. A norm is a tacit and mutual agreement that certain exercises of power, while lawful, also are unthinkable. As a result, a willingness to think the unthinkable is itself a source of power. With that willingness, you can deny a president a hearing on a Supreme Court nominee. You can threaten to jail your political opponents and call an election rigged if you don’t win. You can demand investigations of your enemies, you can fire the FBI director investigating you, and you can quite possibly pardon yourself for federal crimes.

Trump and Republicans are not interested in self-restraint. We ought to be past surprise, for example, that the “let the people decide” standard invented by Mitch McConnell to block Merrick Garland’s Supreme Court nomination no longer applies now that Trump can choose a successor for Anthony Kennedy. Those who care about the future of liberal democracy in this country ought to be beyond outrage and ready for something altogether colder and more disciplined.

Democrats should plan to treat political norms, when and if they’re in charge of a unified government, the way Trump and the Republicans do. They should be readying a program of systematic norm-breaking for partisan advantage—but only if they are willing and able to follow it through to its conclusion.




Posted by friendly_iconoclast | Thu Jul 5, 2018, 04:18 PM (11 replies)
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