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FSogol

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Gender: Male
Hometown: Northern VA
Member since: Fri Oct 29, 2004, 10:34 AM
Number of posts: 33,325

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Across the Globe with US Attorney General Jeff Session....

From Tom the Dancing Bug

Russian Nesting Dolls

The Washington Post had this picture on the cover of my print edition this morning:



Tillerson is the middle doll.

Ok DU Gardeners. How do I keep the squirrels from eating my tulips?

There is plenty of sunflower seed around, but they break off a tulip, take a few bites and then decide they don't taste that great. Any way to keep them away?

Edible batteries use stomach acid as the electrolyte

Batteries of various technologies and form factors get a lot of attention for many reasons. Everyone is looking for a battery with higher energy density by weight and volume, with superior discharge (and even charge) specifications, and low cost. As a result, there's been lots of attention on lithium-ion (Li-ion) chemistry and its many variations, since that seems to offer – at least for the foreseeable future – the greatest potential (pun intended) in meeting those density objectives.

Still, there are applications where unusual chemistries, construction, and form factor are the priorities, more than just an incrementally better Li-ion cell. Consider the work being done by a team lead by Prof. Christopher Bettinger at Carnegie Mellon University. They are developing edible, biocompatible batteries that use non-toxic materials already present in the body, with available liquids such as stomach acid as the electrolyte; see references below (Figure 1). His team has produced cathodes based on melanin, a pigment already in the body, and anodes made of manganese oxide, which is also already present; other versions based on body-friendly materials have also been developed.

The idea is that the electrodes will dissolve harmlessly after use. Most of the resulting batteries, using a variety of soluble cations, had modest voltages (between 0.5 and 0.7 volts); although definitive specifications are hard to find, there was one mention of 5 milliwatts of power for up to 20 hours.



More at http://www.edn.com/electronics-blogs/power-points/4458024/Batteries-safe-for-use-in-humans-and-fish

Puppy vs Steps

http://imgur.com/a/FsX79

LOL, at Rubio (who looks like they pulled him out of a bar at last call) & is pretending to be an

expert on something.

Ghosts of American Astronauts

Question: Bannon was removed from the NSC, but he is still a WH advisor right?

He'll go to work at the WH today, helping Trumpy wreck our country, right?

Or am I not understanding his removal?

Trump Calls Obama To Talk About Chancellor Merkel from Conan O'Brien

Skip ahead to 6 min, 16 seconds

&feature=youtu.be&t=6m16s

Add many architects to the various groups...who are distressed by Trumps 2018 budget proposal

Add many architects to the various groups—like environmentalists, the poor, the elderly, and people with disabilities—who are distressed by Donald Trump’s 2018 budget proposal. The president, in a preliminary proposal released Thursday, envisions steep cuts to, or outright elimination of, many programs that architects say benefit their profession. With Trump looking to dramatically scale back domestic discretionary spending across the board, the programs at risk cover a wide array of issues, including housing, transportation, arts, and urbanism.

Here are some of the main programs—as identified by architecture lobbyists and housing advocates—at risk:


(List is below, but the entire article by Ben Adler at the Architectural Review is at
http://www.architecturalrecord.com/articles/12451-how-trumps-budget-impacts-architects

Community Development Block Grants (CDBG)
Affordable housing programs within HUD
Smart growth-friendly programs in HUD and the Department of Transportation (DOT)
National Endowment for the Arts (NEA)
Energy Star


If Congress does pass a budget, rather than following the recent practice of continuing current funding levels in the face of legislative gridlock, few of these proposed cuts would be fully enacted. Even many Republicans would object to some of them. Stephen Glaude, CEO of the Coalition for Nonprofit Housing and Economic Development and a former HUD undersecretary in the first Bush administration, for example, told CNBC that he finds the prospect of ending CDBG “alarming.”

But the real cause for alarm is not the unlikely chance that popular programs like CDBG will actually be zeroed out; rather, it’s the president’s vision to do so.
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