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MinM

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Member since: Mon Oct 8, 2007, 11:23 AM
Number of posts: 2,312

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Sandy Serrano

A great example in the RFK case was the interrogation of Sandy Serrano by CIA plant in the LAPD (Hank Hernandez) ..


Somewhat analogous to the CIA torture program in that far from fact-finding or legitimate attempts to get at the truth .. it was intended to support a given narrative.

In the Line of Fire (1993)


This was ostensibly a piece of meme-reversal by Clint Eastwood to counter Oliver Stone's JFK.


Given all of the recent snafus by the Secret Service we might be due another Eastwood film to resuscitate their reputation.

American Sniper appears to trend in that genre...

Good read...

Although incompetence would not really apply in this case. Arlen Specter was a political fixer. If there was a narrative that needed protection from inconvenient truth .. Specter was the man.

From .. Jean Hill to Anita Hill .. Arlen Specter protected certain narratives from those inconvenient facts. Arlen may have been a lot of things but incompetent was not one of them. In fact Specter proved to be very effective in his chosen role.

JFK v J Edgar

Jim DiEugenio has an excellent critique of JFK. Jim also makes the point that no other movie has ever been subjected to the historical scrutiny that JFK was. Clint Eastwood's whitewashed wikified version of J Edgar is a good recent example of that.

From my own point of view the Clay Shaw trial dragged on a bit too long. Especially considering that Jim Garrison's investigation had been compromised from the start...


http://metamorphosis.democraticunderground.com/?com=view_post&forum=1002&pid=2922632

http://journals.democraticunderground.com/MinM/300

http://journals.democraticunderground.com/MinM/250

Tom Selleck is worse than Ted Nugent


Tom Selleck, rightly or wrongly, lends the NRA a veneer of credibility that they would never get with nutjobs like Ted Nugent.

It's somewhat analogous to this Rick Snyder - Scott Walker comparison.

In an interview with 60 Minutes that Ended Up Online?

It's interesting that 60 Minutes has been airing these puff pieces about the FBI and CIA on air but relegate this story to the internet.

Honduras: Under New Management

@SanhoTree · Under New Management. Honduras to experiment w/private cities. http://www.foreignpolicy.com/articles/2014/09/01/under_new_management_amapala_honduras_charter_cities … Cuz sovereignty is for those who can afford it.

In 2009, far from Honduras, respected economist Paul Romer, then of Stanford University, appeared at a TED conference in the United Kingdom to unveil a big idea. Against the backdrop of a satellite image of the Korean Peninsula at night, Romer compared the North's blackness with the South, which glowed with electricity and economic activity. Causing the stark contrast, Romer argued, were the Hermit Kingdom's bad or impractical regulations. Similar problems existed throughout the developing world. Romer's plan? Sign over a large tract of "uninhabited" land in a struggling country to a developed guarantor nation, which would create and oversee an investment zone free from the host country's fickle politics and troublesome rules. Enter the charter city.

Romer's idea captured headlines in the Atlantic and the New York Times. Many international development advocates criticized it for its blatantly neocolonialist features, but it found supporters too. Proponents invariably pointed to Hong Kong, China's "special administrative region" that operates under different rules than the mainland, as a shining example of the results that autonomy can yield. And charter cities almost got off the ground in Madagascar, where Romer found a receptive partner in President Marc Ravalomanana. Malagasy charter cities went down the drain, however, when Ravalomanana was forced to resign, partly because of fierce opposition to his willingness to hand over land to foreigners. (He had negotiated a plan to lease more than 1.2 million hectares to South Korea's Daewoo, to grow corn and palm-oil exports.)

Around the same time, in Honduras, President Manuel Zelaya was ousted in a coup and replaced by the more conservative Porfirio Lobo Sosa. The new president faced a dire national situation: 60 percent of Honduras's citizens lived in poverty, its murder rate was climbing (from 50 homicides per 100,000 people in 2007, to 70.7 in 2009), and immigration to the United States was rising so fast that a domestic manufacturing association launched a campaign beseeching workers, "Stay With Us." While looking for ways to kick-start investment in the country, a Lobo aide named Octavio Sánchez discovered Romer's TED talk. It echoed similar ideas being proposed by Mark Klugmann, an American political consultant and former speechwriter for President Ronald Reagan who had worked on Lobo's campaign. Romer and Sánchez set up a meeting and began working on a plan to build charter cities in Honduras. "My sense was that it was worth putting some of my time and effort into doing something that might help," says Romer, now a professor at New York University's Stern School of Business.

In early 2011, the Honduran National Congress passed a constitutional amendment allowing for special development regions (REDs), which were like charter cities but without Romer's guarantor nation. They would have investors and be overseen by a government-appointed Transparency Commission -- Romer says he was to be a part of it -- which would select a Honduran governor for each RED. The regions would set their own regulations and jurisdictions; only when it had been determined that they had developed the necessary institutions and populations to hold their own elections would regions transition to democratic control...

http://www.foreignpolicy.com/articles/2014/09/01/under_new_management_amapala_honduras_charter_cities

http://www.rigorousintuition.ca/board2/viewtopic.php?p=516068#p516068

http://www.rigorousintuition.ca/board2/viewtopic.php?f=8&t=35438

Edwin Meese

The 5 creepiest things about how the Koch brothers engineered the shutdown

This weekend, The New York Times revealed how the Koch Brothers and Reagan Attorney General Ed Meese engineered this here shutdown we’re dealing with right now, and how they’d been planning it ever since Obama was reelected. I wasn’t especially shocked by it, myself. Hell, half of the Tea Party people in the House actually campaigned on it. Which is why I have been annoyed as hell with the whole “Oh, well, it’s really both parties at fault here!” line of reasoning that some people have been trying to take...

http://www.deathandtaxesmag.com/207311/the-5-creepiest-things-about-how-the-koch-brothers-engineered-the-shutdown/

This current mess is just one reason it Still Matters .. because the powers that were directly implicated in or at the least 'benefited' from the removal of JFK were fascists like the Koch Bros.

Also in the case of Ed Meese we have somebody directly involved in the JFK coverup who is Still wreaking havoc with our Country...
...When he introduces Garrison's investigation it is essentially more of the same. For instance, about the arrest of Clay Shaw, Talbot writes, "But to Garrison, he was a CIA-linked international businessman. . .."

Today, there can be no "buts" about it. Shaw was not just "linked" to the CIA, he worked for them. We have this not just from the declassified files, but from FBI agent Regis Kennedy, who said, in referring to Shaw's association with Permindex, that Shaw was a CIA agent who had worked for the Agency in Italy. (Let Justice Be Done, by William Davy, p. 100)

To further downplay the importance of what Garrison uncovered, Talbot quotes former RFK aide, Ed Guthman. Guthman was working as an editor for the Los Angeles Times in early 1967. He tells Talbot that he sent his ace reporters to New Orleans and they discovered that Garrison had no evidence for his charges. Guthman calls them "great reporters". If Talbot would have dug a little deeper he would have found out a couple of interesting things these "great reporters" had done.

One of the "great" reporters was Jack Nelson. Nelson's source for Garrison not having any evidence was former FBI agent and Hoover informer Aaron Kohn. Kohn was, among other things, an unofficial assistant to Shaw's defense team. Another of Guthman's "great" reporters was Jerry Cohen. Cohen cooperated with FBI informant Larry Schiller in keeping Garrison from extraditing Loran Hall. This cooperation extended up to flying with Hall to Sacramento to speak to Edwin Meese. Further, Cohen kept up a correspondence with Shaw's lawyers and even Shaw himself. This is great reporting? ...

http://www.ctka.net/brothers.html

Of course Edwin Meese, with the blessing of his boss (Gov Ronald Reagan), would go on to deny Garrison's extradition request. This is just one small example of how Jim Garrison's case was undermined but it demonstrates how far back deep-state players like Ed Meese go.


Keep up the great work Octafish. You're doing the memories of Gaeton Fonzi and Roger Feinman proud.

Edwin Meese is still in place too...]

RFK visited Detroit in 1968

@MichiganHist: Senator Robert Kennedy touring 12th st area affected by riot - 5/1968 Detroit News pic (WSU Lib) #DetroitHistory

Andrew Kaczynski @BuzzFeedAndrew · This NYT front page from August 14, 1965.

George Will is a political apparatchik

He's been a bad actor in the media and behind the scenes for years ..
...McCloy asked President Carter to allow the Shah to live in the United States. Carter refused because he had told by his diplomats in Iran that such a decision might encourage the embassy being stormed by mobs. As a result McCloy made preparations for the Shah to stay in the Bahamas. David Rockefeller arranged for his personal assistant at Chase Manhattan, Joseph V. Reed, to manage the Shah's finances.

Rockefeller also established the highly secret, Project Alpha. The main objective was to persuade Carter to provide a safe haven for Mohammad Reza Pahlavi (code-named "Eagle"). McCloy, Rockefeller and Kissinger were referred to as the "Triumvirate". Rockefeller used money from Chase Manhattan Bank to pay employees of Milbank, Tweed, Hadley & McCloy who worked on the project. Some of this money was used to persuade academics to write articles defending the record of Pahlavi. For example, George Lenczowski, professor emeritus at the University of California, was paid $40,000 to write a book with the "intention to answer the shah's critics".

Kissinger telephoned Zbigniew Brzezinski, National Security Advisor to Carter, on 7th April, 1979, and berated the president for his emphasis on human rights, which he considered to be "amateurish" and "naive". Brzezinski suggested he talked directly to Jimmy Carter. Kissinger called Carter and arranged for him to meet David Rockefeller, two days later. Gerald Ford also contacted Carter and urged him to "stand by our friends".

McCloy, Rockefeller and Kissinger arranged for conservative journalists to mount an attack on Carter over this issue. On 19th April, George F. Will wrote about Carter and the Shah and said; "It is sad that an Administration that knows so much about morality has so little dignity."

On 19th April, Rosalynn Carter wrote in her diary: "We can't get away from Iran. Many people - Kissinger, David Rockefeller, Howard Baker, John McCloy, Gerald Ford - all are after Jimmy to bring the shah to the United States, but Jimmy says it's been too long, and anti-American and anti-shah sentiments have escalated so that he doesn't want to. Jimmy said he explained to all of them that the Iranians might kidnap our Americans who are still there." ...

http://spartacus-educational.com/USAmccloyJ.htm

http://sync.democraticunderground.com/10025293372#post58

Of course we now know that not only did these right-wingers instigate the hostage taking in Iran but they prolonged it until Carter was voted out and Reagan was sworn in.
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