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LT Barclay

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Member since: Fri Apr 15, 2011, 09:54 AM
Number of posts: 2,168

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Our puppet show about the vaquita.

We performed this at Jean-Michel Cousteau's Ocean Futures Society's family camp on Catalina Island.
We are going to perform an Act 2 this summer in a couple of weeks.

I'm not looking at this as off topic as it has to do with a critically endangered species.

It is supposed to be published by YouTube at 6:00 pm CDT. So it may be a few minutes before it will play.

For fans of the Cousteau's (follow up to a post from a year ago)

About a year ago I posted that my family and I were headed to a family camp hosted by Jean-Michel Cousteau on Santa Catalina Island. I promised an update after camp and I'm sorry it took so long.
OK, we flew into Oakland and started the next morning. We took the kids to Lake Merritt because I proposed there on a gondola ride. Then we headed across the Richmond-San Rafael bridge so we could take the kids south across the golden gate. We drove down Lombard St. and from there to Telegraph Hill, because our son hoped to see the parrots, but we could hear them but never saw them. From there we parked and rode the cable cars and hoped a streetcar back to Pier 39 for lunch and to watch the sea lions. Then a dash to Ana Nuevo to see elephant seals. We spent the night in Monterey Bay and the next day enjoyed the aquarium and the 17-mile drive where we saw a few sea otters. Day 3 was a whale watching trip from Monterey where we followed a family of humpbacks with an exuberant youngster who kept breaching (we were told this behavior is uncharacteristic for that time of year, but it was great for us to see more than just a back and spout).
Day 4 started family camp. It was a bit overwhelming to see JMC in person and I probably could have talked to him more if my eyes weren't bugging out every time he was there. Camp was a great place and there was something for all of us. I was able to meet and talk with a childhood hero, my son gained independence, my daughter gained confidence (she couldn't order her own food on the way down but sang a solo at camp talent night) and my wife had time for peace and healing (health challenges are another long story). It was also the kid's first real vacation and first chance to see the ocean, which was great for family bonding (our kids are adopted from the foster system another long story). We had the usual camp activities, archery, ax throwing (not at each other), arts and crafts, swimming, hiking, and snorkeling. Each family had the opportunity for a snorkeling trip with JMC (see my goofy picture). There was also a garden, we had a microscope lab led by Dr. Richard Murphy who has worked with JYC and JMC since 1968 (he's with JMC in the second picture, doing what they both love most, educating children). The microscope lab was one of the most fascinating things at camp. I also did a night snorkel, which I probably never would have done without the spotters (camp counselors). I also can't say enough good things about the staff of the camp who were patient and friendly the whole time.
The final night (Saturday) was a talent show. We didn't know that would happen until Thursday night so I spent much of Friday writing a script for a puppet show (I had the puppets, why is... you guessed it, another long story). Our puppet show was about Lou Seal Ball learning about why the vaquitas are endangered from Valerie the Vacquita Bertinelli and Harrison Whales. My wife then recited a poem she had written that day about endangered species. My wife got high praise from JMC the said he loved her poem. He then told me that our show was excellent as it was the only act that was fun, educational and had a good message. So I'm still on top of the world after receiving praise from one of my life's heros.
So, the latest news is my wife wants to go back (I didn't ask or pressure) AND I have already fixed the script in mind for this years puppet show. I'd post the previous show, but the sound quality is really bad (we had to share 1 copy of the script and 1 microphone) so I will post after we reenact the whole thing.

https://www.snapfish.com/share?via=link&token=fPOFL7uoQ3GjJ1dQNrpPfA/AUS/27952499821070/SNAPFISH


https://www.snapfish.com/share?via=link&token=fPOFL7uoQ3GjJ1dQNrpPfA/AUS/27952498142070/SNAPFISH

(can't get the pictures to appear in the post, but the links appear to work)

It is beyond terrifying.

I just perused my wife's facebook and I'm embarassed to be related to my family. They're still hoping Trump will be back, denying COVID, knocking BLM movement, laughing at liberals, blah, blah, blah and yet:

Attempt to use AI to decode whale language...

a bunch of scary smart people working on an amazing project:

https://www.nationalgeographic.com/animals/article/scientists-plan-to-use-ai-to-try-to-decode-the-language-of-whales

Better than a primary: humpbacks, northern right whale dolphins, pacific white-sided dolphins and

a few sea lions for fun:

https://www.ksbw.com/article/watch-underwater-video-of-northern-right-whale-dolphins-lunge-feeding-humpbacks-in-monterey-bay/30970936

Shots fired at Sea Shepherd vessel working to save the vaquita in the Gulf of California



Sorry, I've been wanting to post this for a while, but have been busy.

For those who may not have a background on this issue, a few points:

1. The Vaquita is a unique, shy, beautiful porpoise who is a one of a kind. There are only a few left, current estimates say less than 10. This isn't losing a regional population of a species with a broader range, vaquitas are only found in the Gulf of California. They are so shy, they were only seen by scientists in the 1970's and few pictures exist that are not of dead vaquitas.

2. Species with historically low populations DO NOT have the inbreeding problems that result in other species that experience genetic bottlenecks. The current hypothesis is that all deleterious genes have been eliminated.

3. This is NOT a historic fishery, as fishermen came to the area primarily to fish for the totoaba to send to the Chinese. In the past the fish were left to rot while the bladders were shipped.

4. The best thing for the vaquita and the fisherfolk would be a NO GO reserve. Research has shown that marine reserves IMPROVE fishing in the surrounding waters.

5. Fishing gear that is safe for the vaquita does exist and sustainable catch should be supported so the fisherfolks can make a living. The government of Mexico has held back from permitting the new gear (reasons unknown).

6. EXTINCTION IS FOREVER!!

7. Sea Shepherd needs your help.

8. If we can't win the fight to save this species, there is little hope to save any, at least any in the ocean. This is a geographically isolated problem without a big corporation mucking things up. Just a few fishermen looking for easy money. The vaquita isn't even the targets species and there is no competition for land use or other things that make so many endangered species issues so complex. This is the easy one. We need to win.

Southern Right Whale Dolphins

I posted in DU Lounge, but thought more folks might find it here.
Just a interlude for the sheer fascination of the movement and beauty of these creatures:

ABC Nightline covers the documentary "Sea of Shadows" and the fight to save the vaquita




For those who may not have a background on this issue, a few points:

1. The Vaquita is a unique, shy, beautiful porpoise who is a one of a kind. There are only a few left, current estimates say less than 10. This isn't losing a regional population of a species with a broader range, vaquitas are only found in the Gulf of California. They are so shy, they were only seen by scientists in the 1970's and few pictures exist that are not of dead vaquitas.

2. The best thing for the vaquita and the fisherfolk would be a NO GO reserve. Research has shown that marine reserves IMPROVE fishing in the surrounding waters.

3. Species with historically low populations DO NOT have the inbreeding problems that result in other species that experience genetic bottlenecks. The current hypothesis is that all deleterious genes have been eliminated.

4. EXTINCTION IS FOREVER!!

5. Sea Shepherd needs your help.

6. This is NOT a historic fishery, as fishermen came to the area primarily to fish for the totoaba to send to the Chinese. In the past the fish were left to rot while the bladders were shipped.

7. Fishing gear that is safe for the vaquita does exist and sustainable catch should be supported so the fisherfolks can make a living. The government of Mexico has held back from permitting the new gear (reasons unknown).





Trailer for "Sea of Shadows" the fight to save the VAQUITA !!!!!



https://www.firstshowing.net/2019/official-trailer-for-porpoise-rescue-documentary-sea-of-shadows/

For those who may not have a background on this issue, a few points:

1. The Vaquita is a unique, shy, beautiful porpoise who is a one of a kind. There are only a few left, current estimates say less than 10. This isn't losing a regional population of a species with a broader range, vaquitas are only found in the Gulf of California. They are so shy, they were only seen by scientists in the 1970's and few pictures exist that are not of dead vaquitas.

2. The best thing for the vaquita and the fisherfolk would be a NO GO reserve. Research has shown that marine reserves IMPROVE fishing in the surrounding waters.

3. Species with historically low populations DO NOT have the inbreeding problems that result in other species that experience genetic bottlenecks. The current hypothesis is that all deleterious genes have been eliminated.

4. EXTINCTION IS FOREVER!!

5. Sea Shepherd needs your help.

6. This is NOT a historic fishery, as fishermen came to the area primarily to fish for the totoaba to send to the Chinese. In the past the fish were left to rot while the bladders were shipped.

7. Fishing gear that is safe for the vaquita does exist and sustainable catch should be supported so the fisherfolks can make a living. The government of Mexico has held back from permitting the new gear (reasons unknown).

Mark Trail comic from April 7, 2019 starring the Vaquita

<a data-flickr-embed="true" href="https://www.flickr.com/photos/49157359@N00/46703493775/in/dateposted-public/" title="Mark Trail"><img src="" width="640" height="287" alt="Mark Trail"></a><script async src="//embedr.flickr.com/assets/client-code.js" charset="utf-8"></script>

from www.comicskingdom.com

For those who may not have a background on this issue, a few points:

1. The Vaquita is a unique, shy, beautiful porpoise who is a one of a kind. There are only a few left, current estimates say less than 10. This isn't losing a regional population of a species with a broader range, vaquitas are only found in the Gulf of California. They are so shy, they were only seen by scientists in the 1970's and few pictures exist that are not of dead vaquitas (so I'm including a post of a painting).

2. The best thing for the vaquita and the fisherfolk would be a NO GO reserve. Research has shown that marine reserves IMPROVE fishing in the surrounding waters.

3. Species with historically low populations DO NOT have the inbreeding problems that result in other species that experience genetic bottlenecks. The current hypothesis is that all deleterious genes have been eliminated.

4. EXTINCTION IS FOREVER!!

5. Sea Shepherd needs your help.

6. This is NOT a historic fishery, as fishermen came to the area primarily to fish for the totoaba to send to the Chinese. In the past the fish were left to rot while the bladders were shipped.

7. Fishing gear that is safe for the vaquita does exist and sustainable catch should be supported so the fisherfolks can make a living. The government of Mexico has held back from permitting the new gear (reasons unknown).
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