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Tue Oct 15, 2019, 02:45 AM

Incredible, Rare Underwater Footage Shows Whales Using Bubble 'Nets' to Hunt



(University of Hawaiʻi at Mānoa/Permit Number: NOAA #19703)

NATURE


MICHELLE STARR 15 OCT 2019

Did you know some cetaceans use "nets" to catch their food? Like humpback whales. They'll dive down and swim in a ring around their prey, blowing out bubbles as they go.

That rising ring forms a column that traps fish, allowing other whales in the group to swim up from below, mouths agape, through the bubble cylinder to feast.

It's an absolutely fascinating and beautiful thing to watch - and scientists have caught it on camera in a rare whale's-eye view.

In addition to drone footage showing a stunning overhead view of a pair of humpback whales (Megaptera novaeangliae) creating the bubble nets, marine biologists at the University of Hawaiʻi at Mānoa stuck cameras and sensors on whales using suction cups to collect a wealth of data on the fascinating behaviour.

More:
https://www.sciencealert.com/check-out-this-amazing-video-of-whales-using-bubbles-to-hunt

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Reply Incredible, Rare Underwater Footage Shows Whales Using Bubble 'Nets' to Hunt (Original post)
Judi Lynn Oct 15 OP
Karadeniz Oct 15 #1
Brother Buzz Oct 15 #2
DFW Oct 16 #3
world wide wally Oct 16 #4
blaze Oct 16 #5
LastLiberal in PalmSprings Oct 17 #6

Response to Judi Lynn (Original post)

Tue Oct 15, 2019, 01:25 PM

1. The more we learn, the smarter it turns out animals are! Thanks!

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Response to Judi Lynn (Original post)

Tue Oct 15, 2019, 08:27 PM

2. That is really cool footage! We've known about the bubble nets for, like, forever...

but never really knew and understood the mechanics of how they did it.

I wonder if the Humpback whales circle in the opposite direction south of the equator.

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Response to Judi Lynn (Original post)

Wed Oct 16, 2019, 05:19 AM

3. I've watched them do that

Off the coast of the tip of Cape Cod. It is an unforgettable thing to see up close:
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The North Atlantic humpbacks will often splash their tails to create the bubbles, then dive, and then come up in the middle with their mouths open to catch the fish. They then push the water out through the baleen with their tongues, and swallow the fish. The seabirds know what is coming, and fly close so as to catch fish that escape the whales' open mouths.

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Response to DFW (Reply #3)

Wed Oct 16, 2019, 08:47 AM

4. I saw that in Cape Cod too

The birds flying into the whale's mouth and picking fish out was equally awesome. I thought they were Minke whales.

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Response to Judi Lynn (Original post)

Wed Oct 16, 2019, 10:36 AM

5. I've seen it!!!!

My one and only cruise... on a small (62 passenger) ship in SE Alaska. So amazing to watch!

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Response to Judi Lynn (Original post)

Thu Oct 17, 2019, 05:19 PM

6. The closer you get, the more interesting it is.



"You're going to have to clean out that wet suit."

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