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rug

(82,333 posts)
Fri Sep 30, 2016, 02:31 PM Sep 2016

Obama: Why I won't say 'Islamic terrorism'

"There's no religious rationale that would justify in any way any of the things that they do," he says



By Daniella Diaz, CNN
Updated 4:49 PM ET, Thu September 29, 2016

Washington (CNN) — President Barack Obama has taken a lot of criticism from political opponents over his rhetoric when it comes to terrorism. But on Wednesday at a CNN presidential town hall, he was asked to defend why he refuses to say "Islamic" terrorism to a Gold Star mother.

"My son gave his life for acts of terrorism," audience member Tina Houchins told Obama at the town hall moderated by CNN's Jake Tapper. "Do you still believe that the acts of terrorism are done for the self-proclaimed Islamic religious motive? And if you do, why do you still refuse to use the term ... Islamic terrorist?"

Obama called it a "sort of manufactured" issue.

"There is no doubt, and I've said repeatedly, where we see terrorist organizations like al Qaeda or ISIL -- They have perverted and distorted and tried to claim the mantle of Islam for an excuse for basically barbarism and death," he said.

http://www.cnn.com/2016/09/28/politics/obama-radical-islamic-terrorism-cnn-town-hall/index.html

2:57 video at link.
41 replies = new reply since forum marked as read
Highlight: NoneDon't highlight anything 5 newestHighlight 5 most recent replies
Obama: Why I won't say 'Islamic terrorism' (Original Post) rug Sep 2016 OP
Obama is a wise man n/t True Dough Sep 2016 #1
He gives thought to what he says. rug Sep 2016 #8
K&R mwrguy Sep 2016 #2
I would prefer the term "Islamist terrorism." David__77 Sep 2016 #3
I prefer "group sponsored violence". guillaumeb Sep 2016 #4
Very well said Jason1961 Sep 2016 #5
Thank you, and welcome to DU. guillaumeb Sep 2016 #7
Religious terrorism is a more apt term. cleanhippie Sep 2016 #12
And state sponsored terrorism is preferable? guillaumeb Oct 2016 #19
Did anyone say it is? cleanhippie Oct 2016 #29
The focus should be on the violence, not the claimed motivation. eom guillaumeb Oct 2016 #38
Now you've done it. You asked him to focus. rug Oct 2016 #39
My point is that the violence should always be the focus, not the claimed motivation. guillaumeb Oct 2016 #40
I agree with that point. If your legs are blown off it matters little why. rug Oct 2016 #41
Bigotry of the Right Jason1961 Sep 2016 #6
Man, I like this place more and more every day True Dough Sep 2016 #9
Enjoy yours as well. rug Sep 2016 #10
Religious terrorism is a more apt term. cleanhippie Sep 2016 #11
No it isn't. rug Sep 2016 #13
I disagree. cleanhippie Sep 2016 #14
Hmm, Obama or cleanhippie? rug Sep 2016 #15
Opinion is opinion. cleanhippie Sep 2016 #16
It's not a matter of being "politically correct" (where have we heard that term lately). rug Sep 2016 #17
So saying "God tells us to do this" isn't reigious? cleanhippie Sep 2016 #18
Does saying "Defend Liberty" while invading a country make it patriotic? rug Oct 2016 #23
To those that say that, it is. cleanhippie Oct 2016 #30
Reality is measured by objectivity not subjectivity. rug Oct 2016 #34
... opiate69 Oct 2016 #35
Now you're getting it. rug Oct 2016 #36
Obama defends religious privilege... MellowDem Oct 2016 #20
You don't get what religious privilege is and is not. rug Oct 2016 #21
I didn't say that statement was religious privilege... MellowDem Oct 2016 #25
+1 cleanhippie Oct 2016 #31
Sometimes when you dance around the edges to much Leontius Oct 2016 #22
Then it's good he was direct and not dancing. rug Oct 2016 #24
He'd reach many if he said "Same reason I don't call the Oklahoma City bombing christian terrorism". Bernardo de La Paz Oct 2016 #26
Or the Branch Davidians at Waco Bozvotros Oct 2016 #27
Nevertheless, it takes nothing away from what he did say. rug Oct 2016 #28
Only if one ignores the point being made. cleanhippie Oct 2016 #32
Yes, Obama is conceerned about bigotry against Christian terrorists. rug Oct 2016 #33
Nonsense. . . . .nt Bernardo de La Paz Oct 2016 #37

David__77

(23,749 posts)
3. I would prefer the term "Islamist terrorism."
Fri Sep 30, 2016, 02:50 PM
Sep 2016

I consider that Islamism as an ideology that may motivate or be used to justify acts of violence. I don't find there to be a problem with the individual religiousity; rather, the problem is with individuals who seek to impose Islamism on the society. I don't agree with obscuring the role of Islamism as a cause/justification.

guillaumeb

(42,641 posts)
4. I prefer "group sponsored violence".
Fri Sep 30, 2016, 02:59 PM
Sep 2016

As opposed to "government sponsored violence", which takes far more lives.

Jason1961

(413 posts)
6. Bigotry of the Right
Fri Sep 30, 2016, 03:02 PM
Sep 2016

While disagreeing on certain policies is acceptable I would find it hard to be friends with anyone that bought into their bigotry.

True Dough

(17,462 posts)
9. Man, I like this place more and more every day
Fri Sep 30, 2016, 06:36 PM
Sep 2016

I realize there's not an overwhelming response here so far but on a couple of boards that I frequented in the past there would be a few alt-right types frothing at the mouth about how all things Islam are inherently dangerous ("religion of peace" was their never-ending mantra) and how allowing any refugees to come to the U.S. would be a disaster, similar to how Trump always tosses around "disaster."

Have a great weekend, all!

 

rug

(82,333 posts)
13. No it isn't.
Fri Sep 30, 2016, 07:31 PM
Sep 2016
"These are people who've killed children, killed Muslims, take sex slaves, there's no religious rationale that would justify in any way any of the things that they do," he said.

cleanhippie

(19,705 posts)
16. Opinion is opinion.
Fri Sep 30, 2016, 08:05 PM
Sep 2016

Sure, his carries more weight, but it's still just opinion.

I think his saying there's no "religious rationale" is nothing more than his opinion (not to mention it's politically correct) because they themselves (ISIS) use a religious rationale to justify their behavior.

 

rug

(82,333 posts)
17. It's not a matter of being "politically correct" (where have we heard that term lately).
Fri Sep 30, 2016, 08:10 PM
Sep 2016

It's a well-thought out conclusion which decisively rejects the broad-brushing and bigotry that often accompanies people's opinions about religion.

 

rug

(82,333 posts)
23. Does saying "Defend Liberty" while invading a country make it patriotic?
Sat Oct 1, 2016, 05:13 PM
Oct 2016

Because that's what they've been saying for the last thirty years.

The best gauge is actions not words, particularly when it comes to religion.

cleanhippie

(19,705 posts)
30. To those that say that, it is.
Sun Oct 2, 2016, 12:07 AM
Oct 2016

Doesn't make it any less true.

And when it comes to reigious terrorism, their actions speak louder than words.

 

rug

(82,333 posts)
34. Reality is measured by objectivity not subjectivity.
Sun Oct 2, 2016, 12:38 AM
Oct 2016

So, you, along with half of Congress, want him to speak out against Islamic terrorism?

When it comes to character, people are known by the company they keep.

 

rug

(82,333 posts)
36. Now you're getting it.
Sun Oct 2, 2016, 12:48 AM
Oct 2016
But what I have been careful about when I describe these issues is to make sure that we do not lump these murderers into the billion Muslims that exist around the world, including in this country, who are peaceful, who are responsible, who, in this country, are fellow troops and police officers and fire fighters and teachers and neighbors and friends."

MellowDem

(5,018 posts)
20. Obama defends religious privilege...
Sat Oct 1, 2016, 03:13 PM
Oct 2016

The idea that a religious rationale is always for good is dripping with privilege. People do commit acts of terror with a religious rationale, and mainstream religions unfortunately have plenty of violent beliefs explicitly laid out in texts for people to be inspired by.

Ignoring that not only doesn't address the root problem, it is a salve for believers that identify with said beliefs. It's more about protecting the feelings of the religious majority than honestly addressing the issue.

 

rug

(82,333 posts)
21. You don't get what religious privilege is and is not.
Sat Oct 1, 2016, 03:56 PM
Oct 2016

This is not religious privilerge:

"But what I have been careful about when I describe these issues is to make sure that we do not lump these murderers into the billion Muslims that exist around the world, including in this country, who are peaceful, who are responsible, who, in this country, are fellow troops and police officers and fire fighters and teachers and neighbors and friends."

What it is is a clear statement against bigotry.

MellowDem

(5,018 posts)
25. I didn't say that statement was religious privilege...
Sat Oct 1, 2016, 06:06 PM
Oct 2016

The one about it being impossible for religion to inspire violence is.

 

rug

(82,333 posts)
33. Yes, Obama is conceerned about bigotry against Christian terrorists.
Sun Oct 2, 2016, 12:35 AM
Oct 2016

Not the Islamophobia peddled by bigots.

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