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58Sunliner

(4,310 posts)
Thu Mar 26, 2020, 06:50 PM Mar 2020

Stanford has done a study-released yesterday, about sterilizing masks.

https://stanfordmedicine.app.box.com/v/covid19-PPE-1-2

"In this materials science study of N95 face masks, two disinfection methods which do not reduce the filtration efficiency of the meltblown layer after an appreciable number of treatment cycles were found:
•Method 1: 75°C (158 degrees F) Hot Air (30 mins) for 20 cycles
•Method 2: UV (254 nm, 8W, 30 min) for 10 cycles. Steam treatment causes filtration efficiency to drop to ~85% after 5 cycles, and ~80% after 10 cycles."

I use my dryer shelf insert and use an infrared temp sensor. My dryer is an older Duet and I reach temps of 176 degree F in about 8 mins on the medium setting, which is supposedly a 32 minute cycle. Mine tends to shut off early so I go for 2 cycles.
Watch out for the metal nose bridge coming off. I re-glued one.
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Stanford has done a study-released yesterday, about sterilizing masks. (Original Post) 58Sunliner Mar 2020 OP
I saw a story on my local fox affiliate this morning. Cracklin Charlie Mar 2020 #1
I assume they still use the N95 filter. Kind of like a Vog mask, only a Vog has carbon cloth also. 58Sunliner Mar 2020 #5
From the article littlemissmartypants Mar 2020 #2
That seems a little strange. I see it too. 58Sunliner Mar 2020 #4
I've heard that if the concentration of certain sanitizers is too high it causes the virus to ... marble falls Mar 2020 #6
They don't use a sanitizer in the study. They specifically state that you should not use alcohol as 58Sunliner Mar 2020 #7
I'm thinking of the cutting boards. marble falls Mar 2020 #8
Ok. But it seems like boiling water or a bleach solution and a rinse would work. 58Sunliner Mar 2020 #9
I agree. marble falls Mar 2020 #10
great sckarletmelanzana Mar 2020 #3

Cracklin Charlie

(12,904 posts)
1. I saw a story on my local fox affiliate this morning.
Thu Mar 26, 2020, 07:21 PM
Mar 2020

A local 3-D printing company is printing new masks that self seal, that have removable filters that can be replaced after sterilizing the mask body. I believe they worked with local (Kansas City) medical professionals on the design.

Remove mask, pop out old filter, sterilize, pop in new filter. Good to go.

littlemissmartypants

(22,111 posts)
2. From the article
Thu Mar 26, 2020, 08:27 PM
Mar 2020
Stanford infection control expertscurrently recommend four simple thingsto decrease your risk of transmission toindividuals in your home:
1. Wash your hands before you leave
work
2. Wash your hands when you gethome
3. Wear different shoes at home andat work, or wash your hands assoon as you take off your shoes. 4. Disinfect the common touchsurfaces in your home and in yourcar once each day. • Don't disinfect cutting boards or any item that comes into
contact with food


Don't disinfect cutting boards or any item that comes into
contact with food


Don't disinfect cutting boards...

That can't be right!!!

Someone needs to check with the authors on this point. I'm thinking this is a terrible mistake.

58Sunliner

(4,310 posts)
4. That seems a little strange. I see it too.
Fri Mar 27, 2020, 08:58 AM
Mar 2020

Last edited Fri Mar 27, 2020, 10:20 AM - Edit history (3)

I sent an email asking them to clarify that.

marble falls

(55,485 posts)
6. I've heard that if the concentration of certain sanitizers is too high it causes the virus to ...
Fri Mar 27, 2020, 10:03 AM
Mar 2020

harden rather than 'melt' and die.

58Sunliner

(4,310 posts)
7. They don't use a sanitizer in the study. They specifically state that you should not use alcohol as
Fri Mar 27, 2020, 10:10 AM
Mar 2020

it disrupts the static charge on the fabric of the N95 mask.

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