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Sat Jul 29, 2017, 08:04 PM

Is solar a net energy loser above 46 degrees north?

Last edited Sat Jul 29, 2017, 09:57 PM - Edit history (1)


Abstract

Elsevier
Energy Policy
Volume 107, August 2017, Pages 498-505
Energy Policy
Further considerations to: Energy Return on Energy Invested (ERoEI) for photovoltaic solar systems in regions of moderate insolation

. Author links open the author workspace.FerruccioFerronia. Numbers and letters correspond to the affiliation list. Click to expose these in author workspaceOpens the author workspaceOpens the author workspace. Author links open the author workspace.AlexandrosGuekosb. Numbers and letters correspond to the affiliation list. Click to expose these in author workspace. Author links open the author workspace.Robert J.Hopkirkc. Numbers and letters correspond to the affiliation list. Click to expose these in author workspace

Abstract
A paper by Ferroni and Hopkirk (2016) provided evidence that presently available PV systems in regions of moderate insolation like Switzerland and countries north of the Swiss Alps act as net energy sink. These findings were disputed in a paper (Raugei et al., 2017). Additional clarifications in support of our conclusions are explained, including mention of weak points in the argumentation by Raugei et al.

Our study is based on the concept of the extended ERoEI (ERoEIEXT) for PV systems, knowing that this is not the mainstream concept in the Life Cycle Assessment (LCA), applying the Process-Based Life Cycle Assessment. The concept of the ERoEIEXT considers many possible energy contributions needed for assessing the envisioned transition from fossil fuel to other types of energy sources and here in particular to photovoltaics in regions of moderate insolation.
The conclusions of our original study remain unchanged. Any attempt to adopt an Energy Transition strategy by substitution of intermittent for base load power generation in countries like Switzerland or further north will result in unavoidable net energy loss. This applies both to the technologies considered, to the available data from the original study and to newer data from recent studies.


Edited to remove extraneous material and add a link

http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0301421517302914#bib13

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Reply Is solar a net energy loser above 46 degrees north? (Original post)
pscot Jul 2017 OP
msongs Jul 2017 #1
DRoseDARs Jul 2017 #2
pscot Jul 2017 #3
OKIsItJustMe Jul 2017 #4

Response to pscot (Original post)

Sat Jul 29, 2017, 09:18 PM

1. the nuclear industry most likely wants us to believe so nt

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Response to pscot (Original post)

Sat Jul 29, 2017, 09:26 PM

2. Link? nt

 

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Response to DRoseDARs (Reply #2)

Sat Jul 29, 2017, 09:58 PM

3. Link added

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Response to pscot (Original post)

Sat Jul 29, 2017, 11:48 PM

4. Hmm...

One of the issues raised is whether or not solar cell efficiencies have increased.

NREL tracks record efficiencies. Some technologies have leveled off. Others are increasing.
https://www.nrel.gov/pv/national-center-for-photovoltaics.html


See also this comparison. These three companies use different technologies:
http://blog.comparemysolar.co.uk/compare-the-best-solar-panels-yingli-market-leader-versus-first-solar-thin-film-versus-sunpower-high-efficiency/

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