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Wed Oct 16, 2019, 03:02 PM

Do you have a favorite "obscure" short story?

In my opinion, Harlan Ellison was the greatest short story writer of the 20th Century.
My favorite of his is the relatively little known "Driving in the Spikes"

Another great but little known short story is Michael Shea's "Horror on the # 33"

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Reply Do you have a favorite "obscure" short story? (Original post)
red dog 1 Oct 16 OP
Aristus Oct 16 #1
The Wizard Oct 16 #2
NJCher Oct 16 #3
red dog 1 Oct 16 #9
Atticus Oct 16 #4
diva77 Oct 16 #5
yellowdogintexas Oct 22 #81
pansypoo53219 Oct 16 #6
yellowdogintexas Oct 22 #83
pansypoo53219 Oct 23 #88
sarge43 Oct 16 #7
Glorfindel Oct 16 #8
jpak Oct 19 #39
Glorfindel Oct 19 #40
jpak Oct 19 #43
red dog 1 Oct 16 #10
RobinA Oct 16 #11
lastlib Oct 16 #12
miyazaki Oct 16 #16
Glorfindel Oct 20 #68
lastlib Oct 20 #69
Glorfindel Oct 21 #71
klook Oct 22 #76
geralmar Oct 16 #13
First Speaker Oct 16 #15
geralmar Oct 16 #18
yankeepants Oct 16 #14
First Speaker Oct 16 #17
geralmar Oct 16 #19
Paladin Oct 17 #20
malthaussen Oct 17 #21
The Velveteen Ocelot Oct 17 #22
eppur_se_muova Oct 18 #23
klook Oct 19 #33
frogmarch Oct 18 #24
DeminPennswoods Oct 18 #25
DFW Oct 19 #36
ailsagirl Oct 19 #45
DeminPennswoods Oct 19 #46
ailsagirl Oct 20 #61
AJT Oct 18 #26
LuvNewcastle Oct 22 #78
pnwest Oct 18 #27
ms liberty Oct 19 #41
pnwest Oct 19 #42
ms liberty Oct 20 #54
pnwest Oct 20 #62
Glorfindel Oct 20 #48
ms liberty Oct 20 #53
Glorfindel Oct 20 #59
pnwest Oct 20 #63
lastlib Oct 20 #70
Kurt V. Oct 18 #28
FiveGoodMen Oct 18 #29
braddy Oct 18 #30
Bayard Oct 18 #31
hunter Oct 19 #32
klook Oct 19 #34
red dog 1 Oct 19 #35
DFW Oct 19 #37
DFW Oct 19 #38
Glorfindel Oct 20 #47
DFW Oct 20 #49
hunter Oct 20 #58
ailsagirl Oct 19 #44
DFW Oct 20 #50
Peregrine Took Oct 20 #51
flor-de-jasmim Oct 20 #52
CrispyQ Oct 20 #55
nolabear Oct 23 #87
cachukis Oct 20 #56
aka-chmeee Oct 20 #57
RGinNJ Oct 20 #60
Polly Hennessey Oct 20 #64
red dog 1 Oct 20 #65
MatthewHatesTrump2 Oct 23 #85
red dog 1 Oct 20 #66
2naSalit Oct 20 #67
TuxedoKat Oct 21 #72
MicaelS Oct 21 #73
wnylib Oct 21 #74
red dog 1 Oct 22 #75
MatthewHatesTrump2 Oct 23 #86
Bradshaw3 Oct 22 #77
petronius Oct 22 #79
cemaphonic Oct 23 #84
petronius Oct 22 #80
yellowdogintexas Oct 22 #82
Ohiya Oct 23 #89
MatthewHatesTrump2 Oct 25 #90
UTUSN Oct 25 #91
MatthewHatesTrump2 Nov 1 #95
UTUSN Nov 1 #97
red dog 1 Oct 31 #92
smirkymonkey Oct 31 #93
Harker Oct 31 #94
MatthewHatesTrump2 Nov 1 #96
PETRUS Nov 1 #98
red dog 1 Nov 2 #99
jrandom421 Nov 3 #100
MatthewHatesTrump2 Nov 5 #101
MatthewHatesTrump2 Nov 5 #102
MatthewHatesTrump2 Wednesday #103
red dog 1 Thursday #104
Tikki Thursday #105
MatthewHatesTrump2 Thursday #106
MatthewHatesTrump2 Friday #107
red dog 1 Saturday #108
red dog 1 Sunday #109
MatthewHatesTrump2 Yesterday #110

Response to red dog 1 (Original post)

Wed Oct 16, 2019, 03:26 PM

1. I love Harlan Ellison's writing.

I met him back in 2006, and got to have dinner with him!

My favorite 'obscure' story of his is "Along The Scenic Route".

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Response to red dog 1 (Original post)

Wed Oct 16, 2019, 03:29 PM

2. The Conversion of the Jews

by Phillip Roth.

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Response to red dog 1 (Original post)

Wed Oct 16, 2019, 04:05 PM

3. more, more!!

I love to read a short story at night, right before bedtime. I'm interested in the contributions of others.

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Response to NJCher (Reply #3)

Wed Oct 16, 2019, 09:10 PM

9. "Raft" by Larry Tritten

(Google it and you can read it for free)

Two of the best short stories Harlan Ellison wrote are:
1) "The Three Most Important Things in Life"
2) "Gopher in the Gilly"

But the best he ever wrote, imo, is the one I mention at the top of this thread:
"Driving in the Spikes"

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Response to red dog 1 (Original post)

Wed Oct 16, 2019, 04:33 PM

4. "Odour of Chrysanthemums", by D. H. Lawrence. nt

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Response to red dog 1 (Original post)

Wed Oct 16, 2019, 04:38 PM

5. maybe not so obscure, but "Bartleby the Scrivener"

by Herman Melville

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Response to diva77 (Reply #5)

Tue Oct 22, 2019, 11:51 PM

81. I hated this story nt

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Response to red dog 1 (Original post)

Wed Oct 16, 2019, 04:46 PM

6. more a collection. john collier's fancies & goodnights.

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Response to pansypoo53219 (Reply #6)

Tue Oct 22, 2019, 11:58 PM

83. I have read some of these.

Good stuff

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Response to yellowdogintexas (Reply #83)

Wed Oct 23, 2019, 04:08 PM

88. the whole book is pretty good. i just bought a reprint on impulse. pretty good for 1930's.

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Response to red dog 1 (Original post)

Wed Oct 16, 2019, 05:44 PM

7. Young Goodman Brown, Nathael Hawthorne

Love to see it animated.

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Response to red dog 1 (Original post)

Wed Oct 16, 2019, 07:50 PM

8. "The Wendigo," by Algernon Blackwood

Utterly, completely horrifying. To this day, I can't sleep with my feet uncovered.

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Response to Glorfindel (Reply #8)

Sat Oct 19, 2019, 03:23 PM

39. De-fa-go

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Response to jpak (Reply #39)

Sat Oct 19, 2019, 04:24 PM

40. eeeek!

O, my feet, my burning feet of fire!

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Response to Glorfindel (Reply #40)

Sat Oct 19, 2019, 06:26 PM

43. Oh this flame and fiery height!

If memory serves...

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Response to red dog 1 (Original post)

Wed Oct 16, 2019, 09:11 PM

10. "Three Bananas" by Larry Tritten

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Response to red dog 1 (Original post)

Wed Oct 16, 2019, 09:36 PM

11. Also DH Lawrence

The Rocking Horse Winner. It’s not obscure, really, since it’s allegedly one of Lawrence’s most popular short stories, but I didn’t even know he wrote short stories until I ran across it.

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Response to red dog 1 (Original post)

Wed Oct 16, 2019, 09:49 PM

12. Arthur C. Clarke (two stories):

1) "Dog Star" about an astronomer who is adopted by a dog he names Laika (Russian word for "barker" ), whose barking saves him from the second great San Francisco earthquake; and later, on a (future) moonbase, his dream about its barking saves him from a major moonquake.

2) "The Light of Darkness", a scientist seeking to save his African nation from a tyrannical emperor, cripples him by blinding him with a powerful astronomical laser. (I have thought a lot about this story during the Bush/Cheney years, and more recently under AnusMouth.)

Clarke has *so many* good stories, it's difficult to cut it to two--"The Star" and "The Sentinel" (inspiration for the book/movie "2001: A Space Odyssey" ) would certainly be on my list. He was such an incredibly good and prolific writer!

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Response to lastlib (Reply #12)

Wed Oct 16, 2019, 10:36 PM

16. Oh those are good.

"Superiority", another exceptional one.

Even reading about "Moonwatcher" in the opening pages of 2001 is like a gripping short story in and of itself.

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Response to lastlib (Reply #12)

Sun Oct 20, 2019, 09:23 PM

68. "The Ones Who Walk Away from Omelas" by Ursula K. LeGuinn

One of my favorite short stories, and one everyone should read IMHO.

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Response to Glorfindel (Reply #68)

Sun Oct 20, 2019, 09:29 PM

69. I was always impressed with Ms. LeGuin,,,

(even more so after seeing a recent PBS doc on her feminist views), but I never got around to reading her short stories. I probly should. Is that one in an anthology?

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Response to lastlib (Reply #69)

Mon Oct 21, 2019, 07:40 AM

71. Yes. "The Wind's Twelve Quarters: Short Stories by Ursula Le Guin"

It's also available as a PDF online:

https://www.semanticscholar.org/paper/The-Ones-Who-Walk-Away-from-Omelas-Guin/e57397df8d6841d62d5771eae936d60028fffd4e

It's a very short story; only four pages or so.

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Response to Glorfindel (Reply #68)

Tue Oct 22, 2019, 04:39 PM

76. Yes, the quintessential American short story

unfortunately.

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Response to red dog 1 (Original post)


Response to geralmar (Reply #13)

Wed Oct 16, 2019, 10:33 PM

15. Is that Hannes Bok doing the cover...?

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Response to red dog 1 (Original post)

Wed Oct 16, 2019, 10:21 PM

14. The Devil's Crapper by Lawrence Walsh

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Response to red dog 1 (Original post)

Wed Oct 16, 2019, 10:37 PM

17. "It", by Theodore Sturgeon...

...anything by Sturgeon is better than anything by anybody else. (OK, hyperbole. But read some of his stories.) But "It" takes place in the South, deals with the very essence of horror--non-living substances taking on life, often deceased corpses, but in this instance forest detritus and swamp muck. This story, especially the title, obviously, influenced Stephen King. But there's more horror in this short story than there is in the whole 1,000 pages of King's *It*--and I like King's novel...

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Response to red dog 1 (Original post)


Response to red dog 1 (Original post)

Thu Oct 17, 2019, 08:12 AM

20. "The Destructors" by Graham Greene

My favorite short story, obscure or otherwise.

Runner-up: "Roller Ball Murder" by William Harrison. Basis for the classic (James Caan version) sci-fi movie.

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Response to red dog 1 (Original post)

Thu Oct 17, 2019, 10:42 AM

21. Just about anything by William Tenn. n/t

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Response to red dog 1 (Original post)

Thu Oct 17, 2019, 11:07 AM

22. Anything by H.H. Munro ("Saki").

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Response to red dog 1 (Original post)

Fri Oct 18, 2019, 12:20 PM

23. Terry Bisson's "They're Made Out Of Meat" -- admittedly not obscure at all, really.

https://commonlit.s3.us-west-2.amazonaws.com/texts/student_pdfs/000/001/003/original/commonlit_they-re-made-out-of-meat_student.pdf

I'm also charmed by "Bears Discover Fire", for some odd reason.

"The Coon Suit" is either hilarious or a real groaner, depending on your disposition. A shame it's never been circulated as widely as TMOOM.

I only now realized that all three of these stories are in the same collection, "Bears Discover Fire and other stories". I read it years ago, yet all three stories immediately popped into my mind after reading the OP. And no other author did. Hmmmmm.

OTOH, couldn't disagree more strongly about HE. If he were even one-tenth as good as he thinks he is, he'd really be something -- something more than an outsized ego, anyway. I've never finished a story of his without wondering "why did I even bother?".

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Response to eppur_se_muova (Reply #23)

Sat Oct 19, 2019, 01:51 PM

33. "Bears Discover Fire" is one of my favorite stories!

Its a lovely story, and one I've re-read a few times.

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Response to red dog 1 (Original post)

Fri Oct 18, 2019, 04:04 PM

24. A one-act play, really, but

you can read it here as you would a story. https://www.google.com/books/edition/Trifles/wxZaAAAAMAAJ?hl=en&gbpv=1&printsec=frontcover

The play is Trifles, by Susan Glaspell. It was first performed in 1916. I love it.

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Response to red dog 1 (Original post)

Fri Oct 18, 2019, 04:49 PM

25. "The Most Dangerous Game"

by Richard Connell.

Also, "The Blue Serge Suit" by John Langdon

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Response to DeminPennswoods (Reply #25)

Sat Oct 19, 2019, 03:00 PM

36. That one was brilliant.

Last edited Sat Oct 19, 2019, 05:45 PM - Edit history (1)

My dad read it to us as kids in the 1960s.

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Response to DeminPennswoods (Reply #25)

Sat Oct 19, 2019, 08:43 PM

45. Another was "The Storm" by McKNIGHT MALMAR

Mysterious with a surprise ending

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Response to ailsagirl (Reply #45)

Sat Oct 19, 2019, 09:25 PM

46. "The Ransom of Red Chief"

by O. Henry always makes me laugh when I re-read it.

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Response to DeminPennswoods (Reply #46)

Sun Oct 20, 2019, 01:22 PM

61. Me too!

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Response to red dog 1 (Original post)

Fri Oct 18, 2019, 04:53 PM

26. A book of short stories by Donald Ray Pollock.

Southern gothic.....really perverse, hard to put down and hard to read.

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Response to AJT (Reply #26)

Tue Oct 22, 2019, 07:44 PM

78. Speaking of Southern Gothic, my favorite short story of that genre is

"A Rose for Emily," by William Faulkner. Gross, but hilarious, and the lengths the townspeople go to keep Miss Emily from being embarrassed say a lot about the time. Just plausible enough to be shocking.

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Response to red dog 1 (Original post)

Fri Oct 18, 2019, 04:58 PM

27. Don't remember the writer, or the name

of the story...but I remember reading a story in grade school, around ‘74-ish. Totally paraphrasing it here, too.

BUT, the gist of the story was that it was a message from an alien race to us humans, explaining how they’d created us and apologized for the error of how we’d evolved into different colors, and the strife it had caused. And it ended with, “If any of you are still white, we can fix that.”

I was profoundly struck by that, and the assumptions I had made while reading the story. Even as a 4th or 5th grader, I was profoundly moved and made aware of my assumptions.

I’ve thought of that story often, and tried Googling, to no avail. Can’t find it.

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Response to pnwest (Reply #27)

Sat Oct 19, 2019, 04:50 PM

41. I love this description and I want to find this story. n/t

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Response to ms liberty (Reply #41)

Sat Oct 19, 2019, 05:30 PM

42. IKR?!

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Response to pnwest (Reply #42)

Sun Oct 20, 2019, 11:53 AM

54. Glorfindel identified the story, see their reply with a link to it!

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Response to ms liberty (Reply #54)

Sun Oct 20, 2019, 01:32 PM

62. Thank you for the heads up! That's amazing!

It is exactly as I remembered it from 4th grade! LOL! Wow!!

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Response to pnwest (Reply #27)

Sun Oct 20, 2019, 10:36 AM

48. Check out "Reunion," by Arthur C. Clarke, written in 1971

I think this is the story you recall. Here's a link:

https://delong.typepad.com/sdj/2014/06/arthur-c-clarke-1971-reunion.html

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Response to Glorfindel (Reply #48)

Sun Oct 20, 2019, 11:47 AM

53. Thank you so much for finding this!

I have thought about the storyline ever since I read that post, and it was as good as I imagined it could be.

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Response to ms liberty (Reply #53)

Sun Oct 20, 2019, 12:09 PM

59. It's my pleasure.

I'm a big fan of Mr. Clarke's. Plus, I always enjoy being of service to my fellow readers.

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Response to Glorfindel (Reply #59)

Sun Oct 20, 2019, 01:34 PM

63. I am gobsmacked you found it! Thank you

so much. No wonder I loved it, it’s Arthur C. Clark. It is exactly as I remembered it, too. Thank you!!!

Man, it’s just still so profound.

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Response to pnwest (Reply #27)

Sun Oct 20, 2019, 09:37 PM

70. I've read it! It's an Arthur C. Clarke story!

I'll have to go to my library to find the title, but it's in his anthology "The Wind From The Sun". I'll update as soon as I find the title.

On edit: Glorfindel beat me to it! "Reunion"

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Response to red dog 1 (Original post)

Fri Oct 18, 2019, 04:59 PM

28. tough one... hills like white elephants. ..maybe

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Response to red dog 1 (Original post)

Fri Oct 18, 2019, 05:28 PM

29. It's plenty weird, but...

"Zombies" from Chuck Palahniuk's Make Something Up collection is pretty interesting.

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Response to red dog 1 (Original post)

Fri Oct 18, 2019, 05:59 PM

30. The Machine Stops by E. M. Forster, here is a PDF

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Response to red dog 1 (Original post)

Fri Oct 18, 2019, 10:34 PM

31. The Body Politic

By Clive Barker. Love his short stories. This one was actually made into a short film.

"You rely on them every day. To eat. To drive. To work. To live.
So, what happens when your hands grow tired of your commands and plot for freedom? "

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Response to red dog 1 (Original post)

Sat Oct 19, 2019, 12:12 PM

32. Tin Soldier -- Joan D. Vinge

It's set in a future where space travel is painfully slow. It's not a Star Trek or Heinlein universe where men are men and brilliant women wear mini skirts at warp speed.

http://www.isfdb.org/cgi-bin/ea.cgi?Joan_D._Vinge

I'm not sure what "obscure" means since sooner or later everything falls into the sea...

Even the very best short stories in science fiction and fantasy tend to be obscure outside that community, and become more so as time passes.

Harlan Ellison's "Go Toward the Light" is one of my favorite explorations of time travel and religion. It expresses some of my own frustrations with time travel and religion.

I'll bet I could dig up some obscure short stories in my forty year old college papers, excluding perhaps a course by one professor who was infatuated with Doris Lessing. They might have called the course "Doris Lessing Three Days a Week" even though the actual title implied a much greater breadth of literature. There was nothing wrong with that. One hopes Doris Lessing is not obscure, at least not yet, since she was awarded the 2007 Nobel Prize in Literature.

Believe it or not I have a minor in English but it's possible they gave it to me just to make me go away. A university dean who'd seen me kicked out of school twice, once for fighting with one of his teaching assistants, told me, "Hunter, I think you should go to graduate school... BUT NOT HERE."

No he did not say it in all-caps, but I heard it loud and clear.

Here's a dollar kid, now scram!


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Response to red dog 1 (Original post)

Sat Oct 19, 2019, 02:14 PM

34. "Straw" by Gene Wolfe.

It's a very different kind of "what-if" science fiction story, set in a past where the hot air balloon has been invented hundreds of years earlier than it actually was.

Sounds strange, but it's very well done. Wolfe sucked me into the world of this story right away, and I found the characters and setting compelling. When it was over I was sorry he hadn't expanded it into a novel.

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Response to red dog 1 (Original post)

Sat Oct 19, 2019, 02:29 PM

35. "Serendipity" by Larry Tritten

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Response to red dog 1 (Original post)

Sat Oct 19, 2019, 03:08 PM

37. Lost Legacy

By Robert Heinlein.

I always liked it because I always WANT to believe that the eternal struggle against evil will eventually be won. The story, published in 1941, vaguely predicts the coming of Fox News, the modern day Republican party, and people like Mitch McConnell, Franklin Graham and Pat Robertson. Extremely prescient. I'm sure Heinlein was influenced by Mencken when writing this story. He probably would have been dismayed to see to what extent the evil adepts had extended their hold over today's society.

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Response to red dog 1 (Original post)

Sat Oct 19, 2019, 03:09 PM

38. Sredni Vashtar by Saki

When I was about 12, I must have read that story over and over a hundred times.

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Response to DFW (Reply #38)

Sun Oct 20, 2019, 10:27 AM

47. Me, too. I love that story!

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Response to Glorfindel (Reply #47)

Sun Oct 20, 2019, 11:25 AM

49. Sredni Vashtar the beautiful! n/t

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Response to DFW (Reply #38)

Sun Oct 20, 2019, 12:07 PM

58. It's in The Chronicles of Clovis, and it's free at gutenberg.org

http://www.gutenberg.org/ebooks/3688

I sometimes go binge reading at gutenberg.org just as some might binge watch Netflix.

Thanks for posting this!



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Response to red dog 1 (Original post)

Sat Oct 19, 2019, 08:38 PM

44. A really creepy one was "The Distributor" by Richard Matheson

Sick, actually
I read that it really got the crazies excited, though

Another creepy one, while not obscure, was "The Lottery" by Shirley Jackson

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Response to red dog 1 (Original post)

Sun Oct 20, 2019, 11:32 AM

50. One very off the wall story: The Unpleasant Profession Jonathan Hoag

Also by Heinlein.

I am positive that whoever wrote the screenplay for "The Matrix" knew this story by heart.

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Response to red dog 1 (Original post)

Sun Oct 20, 2019, 11:37 AM

51. "The Playground" by Ray Bradbury

The horrors of the playground - like real life but with little kids.

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Response to red dog 1 (Original post)

Sun Oct 20, 2019, 11:44 AM

52. "The Door" - E.B. White

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Response to red dog 1 (Original post)

Sun Oct 20, 2019, 12:00 PM

55. Stephen King's "Night Shift."

Wow. So many memorable stories! I still have the original creepy cover with the eyeballs embedded in a hand.



I love short stories. Looking forward to reading this thread & taking notes.

on edit: You should cross post in Fiction: https://www.democraticunderground.com/?com=forum&id=1193

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Response to CrispyQ (Reply #55)

Wed Oct 23, 2019, 03:15 PM

87. I loved Hearts in Atlantis except for one thing.

My sons were in high school when it came out and when they read the story about the game of hearts that destroyed everyone’s college year, they and their friends tried to do the same thing.

Fortunately they only made it a couple of days. 😂

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Response to red dog 1 (Original post)

Sun Oct 20, 2019, 12:03 PM

56. A Piece of Steak Jack London

Conflicts of poverty and age, all for want of a piece of steak. Boxing millieu in Australia. 7800 words.


https://www.classicshorts.com/stories/steak.html

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Response to red dog 1 (Original post)

Sun Oct 20, 2019, 12:05 PM

57. "My House shall be called the House of Prayer" by William Hope Hodgeson and

"Convergent Series" by Larry Niven

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Response to red dog 1 (Original post)

Sun Oct 20, 2019, 01:04 PM

60. Just about anything from M R James.

Old ghost stories

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Response to red dog 1 (Original post)

Sun Oct 20, 2019, 01:59 PM

64. Stories of Your Life and Others

by Ted Chiang, especially, Tower of Babylon.

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Response to red dog 1 (Original post)

Sun Oct 20, 2019, 04:25 PM

65. "The Kool Aid Wino" by Richard Brautigan

It's more of a "short, short story" and a chapter in Brautigan's book, "Trout Fishing in America"

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Response to red dog 1 (Reply #65)

Wed Oct 23, 2019, 02:50 PM

85. Great story!

I bought "Trout Fishing in America" at City Lights Bookstore in San Francisco many years ago.

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Response to red dog 1 (Original post)

Sun Oct 20, 2019, 04:26 PM

66. "Gopher in the Gilly" by Harlan Ellison

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Response to red dog 1 (Original post)

Sun Oct 20, 2019, 08:06 PM

67. "When We Were Wolves", Jon Billman...

A collection of unusual short stories about life in the rural Rocky Mountain west unlike those you may imagine at first. I read it when it was new, 2000, and later I found it in a used book store so I bought it. I take it out and read it once about every five or six years. Some of the tales are about modern times, others not.

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Response to red dog 1 (Original post)

Mon Oct 21, 2019, 08:21 AM

72. Mother to the World by Richard Wilson

I think it won the Nebula Award for best short story or novella in 1968.

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Response to red dog 1 (Original post)

Mon Oct 21, 2019, 10:14 AM

73. Lot by Ward Moore. n/t

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Response to red dog 1 (Original post)

Mon Oct 21, 2019, 06:57 PM

74. The Lottery by Shirley Jackson

Maybe not so obscure since it was one of my high school English class reading assignments. Gruesome small town ritual.

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Response to red dog 1 (Original post)

Tue Oct 22, 2019, 04:32 PM

75. "Looking For a Legend" by Larry Tritten

(Can be read by doing a Google search, I think)

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Response to red dog 1 (Reply #75)

Wed Oct 23, 2019, 02:52 PM

86. I remember reading that one....It's about looking for Wyatt Earp's grave, right?

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Response to red dog 1 (Original post)

Tue Oct 22, 2019, 05:45 PM

77. Builds a Fire - Jack London

London is obvioulsy not an obscure writer but many have probably only read his better known novels. Builds a Fire is as suspenseful and page-turning as anything you will ever read.

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Response to red dog 1 (Original post)

Tue Oct 22, 2019, 11:00 PM

79. Don't know about obscure, but my first thoughts are:

Last edited Tue Oct 22, 2019, 11:52 PM - Edit history (1)

Theodore Sturgeon, The Man Who Lost the Sea
Cordwainer Smith, The Ballad of Lost C'mell
Bob Shaw, The Light Of Other Days
George R. R. Martin, The Sandkings
Cyril M. Kornbluth, The Marching Morons

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Response to petronius (Reply #79)

Wed Oct 23, 2019, 11:53 AM

84. Sandkings was what made me start the Song of Ice and Fire series

I had a bunch of college friends in the 90s that were really into Game of Thrones when it was first published, but there was no way I was going to start an unfinished series, plus I wasn't really that much into fantasy fiction. But people kept talking about the series, and eventually I put it together that the author was the Sandkings guy and had to read it right away.

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Response to red dog 1 (Original post)


Response to red dog 1 (Original post)

Tue Oct 22, 2019, 11:58 PM

82. Rappaccini's Daughter by Nathaniel Hawthorne nt

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Response to red dog 1 (Original post)

Wed Oct 23, 2019, 04:35 PM

89. One by T. C. Boyle, I don't remember the name...

about a shipload of potential wives coming to Alaska.

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Response to red dog 1 (Original post)

Fri Oct 25, 2019, 04:59 PM

90. "The Autopsy" by Michael Shea

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Response to red dog 1 (Original post)

Fri Oct 25, 2019, 10:12 PM

91. "obscure" in the sense of: I wanna *FIND* it!1 About the 1919 World Series

It was in an elementary school compilation/reader, about a kid baseball fanatic excited about a visiting small league team with a player from the 1919 disgraced ones. The kid was excellent. worshipped the sport. The disgraced player was on Second Base. The kid hit just enough to get to Second, and then slid and *spiked* him.

He was stunned to see the player (Shoeless Joe?) sit/sink down to the grown, with blood flowing out on the pants leg, pulling up the pants leg - and his shin was COVERED with scars. Because every damned little town he went to, some kid would *SPIKE* him.

I've never forgotten this story, don't know the title or author, have looked over the years and asked about it here.


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Response to UTUSN (Reply #91)

Fri Nov 1, 2019, 05:34 PM

95. Was that player "Shoeless Joe Jackson?

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Response to MatthewHatesTrump2 (Reply #95)

Fri Nov 1, 2019, 07:30 PM

97. Probably, Say-it-isn't-so wasn't the focus of the story

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Response to red dog 1 (Original post)

Thu Oct 31, 2019, 09:00 PM

92. "Africa Screams" by Larry Tritten

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Response to red dog 1 (Original post)

Thu Oct 31, 2019, 09:30 PM

93. "Revelation" by Flannery O'Connor

I read it in college and actually wrote a paper on it and got a 4.0 on it. The story had such an impact on me that I didn't need to use any Cliff Notes or anything like that. I wrote the paper over Winter Break on my own with no input from any outside sources. For those of you unfamiliar with the story, here is a link...

http://sittingbee.com/revelation-flannery-oconnor/

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Response to red dog 1 (Original post)

Thu Oct 31, 2019, 10:20 PM

94. "In a Grove"

by Akutagawa Ryunosuke.

Part of the literary foundation of Kurosawa's film "Rashomon."

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Response to red dog 1 (Original post)

Fri Nov 1, 2019, 05:36 PM

96. "Gopher in the Gilly" by Harlan Ellison

I like Michael Shea too!

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Response to red dog 1 (Original post)

Fri Nov 1, 2019, 07:59 PM

98. "The Getaway Lunch," by Tibor Fisher

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Response to red dog 1 (Original post)

Sat Nov 2, 2019, 07:12 PM

99. "Keyboard" by Harlan Ellison

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Response to red dog 1 (Original post)

Sun Nov 3, 2019, 12:42 PM

100. The Shepard by Fredrick Forsythe

As an RAF pilot, Fredrick is flying back to England from his base in Germany. His plane loses electrical power, as well as navigation and radio. Lost, running low on fuel, he's guided by what seems to be a wealthy veteran flying a vintage De Havilland Mosquito. He's guided to an shut down RAF base that was active during the war, and it is there that he learns the true story of the person who guided him to safety.

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Response to red dog 1 (Original post)

Tue Nov 5, 2019, 02:48 PM

101. I agree with you about "Driving in the Spikes"

It's one of Harlan Ellison's best short stories.

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Response to red dog 1 (Original post)

Tue Nov 5, 2019, 02:57 PM

102. Not sure it qualifies as "obscure" but "The Three Most Important Things in Life" by Harlan Ellison

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Response to red dog 1 (Original post)

Wed Nov 6, 2019, 04:47 PM

103. "Trout Fishing in America Shorty"

Richard Brautigan

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Response to red dog 1 (Original post)

Thu Nov 7, 2019, 04:05 AM

104. "In Video Veritas" by Larry Tritten

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Response to red dog 1 (Original post)

Thu Nov 7, 2019, 10:10 AM

105. "Eight O'Clock in the Morning"...Ray Nelson




Tikki

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Response to red dog 1 (Original post)

Thu Nov 7, 2019, 04:52 PM

106. "A Tiny Feast" by Chris Adrian

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Response to red dog 1 (Original post)

Fri Nov 8, 2019, 02:50 PM

107. "The Hospice" by Robert Aickman

(read it free online)

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Response to red dog 1 (Original post)

Sat Nov 9, 2019, 07:14 PM

108. "Walking Hills" by D.R. McBride

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Response to red dog 1 (Original post)

Sun Nov 10, 2019, 11:52 AM

109. "Delivery" by Michael Shea

One of Michael's best short stories, imo

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Response to red dog 1 (Original post)

Tue Nov 12, 2019, 03:09 PM

110. Another very good "obscure" short story is "Dinner Time" by Russell Edson

(It can be read for free online)

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