HomeLatest ThreadsGreatest ThreadsForums & GroupsMy SubscriptionsMy Posts
DU Home » Latest Threads » Forums & Groups » Main » Video & Multimedia (Forum) » *Dayton and The America L...

Thu Sep 13, 2018, 11:40 AM

*Dayton and The America Left Behind: Now on PBS Frontline, ProPublica



PREVIEW. Dayton, Ohio was once a hub for innovation and industry, before businesses shut down or moved away. Then came the Great Recession. In its aftermath, part-time, low-wage work rather than full-time work with benefits has often become the new normal in cities like Dayton. FRONTLINE & ProPublica go inside one American city's struggle to recover. Covers many factors for the decline, diverse residents, attempts at revival.
In a ProPublica/Frontline collaboration, reporter Alec MacGillis tells the story of Dayton, Ohio, revealing not only the profound struggles of a former industrial powerhouse- but also the rapidly growing economic and social divide among cities. Full program airing Sept. 11 on PBS Frontline, & online at PBS & ProPublica.
MORE & VIDEO, INTRO & FULL PROGRAM, https://www.propublica.org/article/video-dayton-and-the-america-left-behind

8 replies, 998 views

Reply to this thread

Back to top Alert abuse

Always highlight: 10 newest replies | Replies posted after I mark a forum
Replies to this discussion thread
Arrow 8 replies Author Time Post
Reply *Dayton and The America Left Behind: Now on PBS Frontline, ProPublica (Original post)
appalachiablue Sep 13 OP
Submariner Sep 13 #1
appalachiablue Sep 13 #2
appalachiablue Sep 13 #3
FailureToCommunicate Sep 13 #4
LuckyLib Sep 13 #5
appalachiablue Sep 13 #6
LuckyLib Sep 14 #7
appalachiablue Sep 14 #8

Response to appalachiablue (Original post)

Thu Sep 13, 2018, 03:42 PM

1. Saw it Tuesday

Very depressing state of affairs. Seeing Dayton's homegrown industry National Cash Register (NCR) up and move to Atlanta was major kick in the ass.

Very similar to Roger Stone closing down GM in Flint and moving it to Mexico.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to appalachiablue (Original post)


Response to appalachiablue (Original post)

Thu Sep 13, 2018, 07:04 PM

3. Very well done program covering aspects of Dayton, Ohio

which are present in many other small & medium size US cities. Includes factors for the decline including NAFTA & other changes, discriminatory practices in employment and housing- 'redlining' of US neighborhoods which hurt black residents, and the rise & effect of the opioid epidemic. Some promising, recent efforts at renewal are also featured. Similar to other US cities & some rural areas, in Dayton's west side, an almost exclusively African American sector representing about 40% of the population, there is not one grocery store to serve residents.
------
"Being Black In Dayton: Can't Close The Money Gap," By Cornelius Frolik, Dayton Daily News, Oct. 10, 2017.
https://www.daytondailynews.com/news/breaking-news/being-black-dayton-can-close-the-money-gap/PiuJSYxUPnh5lsEAdOSesK/
About 58,000 Dayton residents are black, which is about 41 % of the city’s population. Only 28 major U.S. cities have a larger share of black residents. The chasm helps explain why about 32.5 % of black residents in Montgomery County live in poverty, compared to 12.3 % of whites. In 2015, the median annual income for white people in Montgomery County was $39,925, according to the report. Black people earned $17,000 less, or $22,197.
Workers of all races have had more success finding work as the economy has improved. But disparities are not significantly improving. In the Dayton metro area, the unemployment rate last year was 13.1 % for black workers and 5.7 % for white ones, according to the national State of Black America 2017 report. - More at the Link above.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to appalachiablue (Original post)

Thu Sep 13, 2018, 10:22 PM

4. Sad to read of the decline of a town that gave us the likes of Orville and Wilbur Wright.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to appalachiablue (Original post)

Thu Sep 13, 2018, 10:48 PM

5. No grocery store in the AA part of town.

This is obscene:
“in Dayton's west side, an almost exclusively African American sector representing about 40% of the population, there is not one grocery store to serve residents.”

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to LuckyLib (Reply #5)

Thu Sep 13, 2018, 11:25 PM

6. 'Food deserts' exist in many American low income neighborhoods

and sectors in large, de-industrial cities like Camden, NJ and Baltimore, Md. Also in communities and towns in Appalachia and the Mid-West- Arkansas, Oklahoma, Missouri, more. Abandoned Sacrifice Zones.

Even Walmart which people rely on for groceries and prescriptions are closing down stores, particularly in more rural, small town areas that aren't 'profitable.' So people resort to convenience stores, payday lenders (if they have a paycheck) and Dollar stores.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to appalachiablue (Reply #6)

Fri Sep 14, 2018, 03:08 AM

7. I've worked in communities that are food deserts and it makes my blood boil.

Along with so many other examples of institutional racism, such dismissal of folks' basic needs is simply obscene.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to LuckyLib (Reply #7)

Fri Sep 14, 2018, 12:27 PM

8. Same here, makes me livid. Let the poor and black folks live

with junk food, poor health and diabetes, few jobs and opportunities in decayed communities, in this wealthiest of nations.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink

Reply to this thread