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Native

(5,919 posts)
Sun Oct 1, 2023, 07:17 AM Oct 2023

More than 100 dolphins dead in Amazon as water hits 102 degrees Fahrenheit

Source: CNN

More than a hundred dolphins have been found dead in the Brazilian Amazon amid an historic drought and record-high water temperatures that in places have exceeded 102 degrees Fahrenheit.

The dead dolphins were all found in Lake Tefé over the past seven days, according to the Mamirauá Institute, a research facility funded by the Brazilian Ministry of Science.

The institute said such a high number of deaths was unusual and suggested record-high lake temperatures and an historic drought in the Amazon may have been the cause.

The news is likely to add to the concerns of climate scientists over the effects human activity and extreme droughts are having on the region.

Read more: https://www.cnn.com/2023/10/01/americas/amazon-river-dolphins-dead-temperatures-drought-intl-hnk/index.html

24 replies = new reply since forum marked as read
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More than 100 dolphins dead in Amazon as water hits 102 degrees Fahrenheit (Original Post) Native Oct 2023 OP
Damn........... Lovie777 Oct 2023 #1
No concern too great when it comes to climate change. ananda Oct 2023 #2
And the global warming deniers still ask for evidence. Duncanpup Oct 2023 #3
... pazzyanne Oct 2023 #4
In addition to high water temps, dolphins may have succumbed to Backseat Driver Oct 2023 #5
Very ineresting, and you pose good questions. Native Oct 2023 #6
Heartbreaking Bayard Oct 2023 #11
We had domestic ducks dumped in our suburban community retention lake; Backseat Driver Oct 2023 #14
Grief for our fellow-travellers Hekate Oct 2023 #7
heartbreaking Mixtas Oct 2023 #8
I can't stop thinking of this! Native Oct 2023 #9
We're gonna take everything good & beautiful down with us. CrispyQ Oct 2023 #10
At one point wasn't the Amazon being raided for lumber? SouthernDem4ever Oct 2023 #12
Lumber and then raising cattle Lulu KC Oct 2023 #18
... Delphinus Oct 2023 #13
Tragic. highplainsdem Oct 2023 #15
Devastating. Horrible news for a struggling species. LT Barclay Oct 2023 #16
Thanks for posting this Lulu KC Oct 2023 #17
I was really on the fence about posting this. Checking the news each morning is really an exercise Native Oct 2023 #24
We are cooking this planet alive. roamer65 Oct 2023 #19
That's debatable as it has been a hell of a lot hotter in the past and with higher CO2 levels. cstanleytech Oct 2023 #20
Cooking, versus cooked. roamer65 Oct 2023 #22
Well geological cold phases like the one our planet has been in do not last forever so a climb to cstanleytech Oct 2023 #23
102?!!! C Moon Oct 2023 #21

Backseat Driver

(4,280 posts)
5. In addition to high water temps, dolphins may have succumbed to
Sun Oct 1, 2023, 09:14 AM
Oct 2023

a Botulism strain by eating dead and/or fermented fish carcasses after/during a high-water-temperature water kill.

River dolphins have a thermoregulatory mechanism that adapts to a temporary high temperature aquatic envirnoment, is it possible that hungry mammals and a strain of botulism might also have also played a part or had a simultaneous effect in the wild. The OP article only reports the dolphins died en masse. The following study tested the dolphins mechanism to prevent heat stroke. In this researched mechanism, dolphins ability to survive high-aquatic temps is short-lived and can only occur once, not swing back and forth, if no other environmental changes for the better occur or indeed proceed past maximum heat transfer. The mechanism involves a well-nourished fat layer and blood vasculature to guard against core heat organ build-ups of heat.

In addition, eating large amounts of dead fish infected with colonized botulism spores may not have been considered in the OP article. Botulism strains may have shed and spread disease by re-activation to produce toxins at high temps in stagnant aneorobic conditions. Bolulism strains in the aquatic envirnment that cause disease are fairly hard to detect and are usually diagnosed based upon symptoms that can develop rapidly or may be dependent on amount of shedding and/or consumption. Either way, it causes neurological damage that can improve but never be cured entirely once damage occurs. This may have caused neurologic problems in the dolphins that might have weakened and paralyzed skeletal muscles including those for respiration and movement and/or digestive mechanisms that fail and are readily spread in a "schooled" natural follow the leader situation or when voice communication(s) became paralyzed and interpreted erroneously.

When is a hot-water environment too hot for too long??? Actual temps experienced in the wild may have exceeded tested mechanism maximums for the study???

https://journals.physiology.org/doi/pdf/10.1152/ajpregu.1999.276.4.r1188



Bayard

(21,548 posts)
11. Heartbreaking
Sun Oct 1, 2023, 11:23 AM
Oct 2023

Botulism is a horrible way for an animal to die. "Paralyzes skeletal muscles including those for respiration." I've had 3 donkeys and a couple of goats die from botulism. The effects move up their bodies in a matter of hours until it gets to the lungs, and they can't breathe. They struggle and cry, and there's nothing you can do for them at that point.

I had no idea when we moved here that botulism can stay in the soil for years, and if you get a lot of rain, it can wash to the surface, and be ingested. I vaccinate for it now.

Backseat Driver

(4,280 posts)
14. We had domestic ducks dumped in our suburban community retention lake;
Sun Oct 1, 2023, 12:25 PM
Oct 2023

I'm too old to go catch ducks on the bank; they just head for the center of the 40 ft pond. This year, we raised and released 6 ducklings (because domestics can be really bad parents in caring for the newly hatched. Moma had 5 that fell to 1 within the week; we raised her other 6. It's been very hot and dry in the recent past. They all seemed to be doing well until one got very sick. That Pekin hybrid baby duck was still alive and breathing 48 hours later. No avian vet around but we searched for help, and the duck has now been in duck rehab for about 3 weeks with someone that can help. Wildlife services won't help with feral domestic rehabilitation but have remove one with a quick-fix fish hook injury and collected an injured one for euthanasia at a price. Our sicky this year is still on medication for "limberneck" and paralysis; she is just beginning to care for herself, eating and drinking, swimming better, and taking a few halting steps on grass. If they get treated with anti-toxin and long-term antibiotics some of the neural damage can be diminished enough with careful isolation and rehabilitation to be released back to self-care. People (like us) have enjoyed their presence as free-rangers, and they receive lots of healthy food augmentation, withstanding many cold winters. They do get visitors, wild mallards and ornery Canadian geese, but my worst fear was finding all dead or having to be culled due to Avian Flu...never even dreamed climate changing heat and drought would activate old spores of mycotoxins like botulism in our pond, but looks like that was the differential diagnosis. Note there are about 5-6 strains that can "infect" different species: humans, larger mammals, and birds, that can carry and spread the disease in the food chain (insect nymphs and fly maggots are vectors), but not usually the ones humans catch from improper rotted fermented canned foodstuff around the compactor.

CrispyQ

(35,918 posts)
10. We're gonna take everything good & beautiful down with us.
Sun Oct 1, 2023, 11:03 AM
Oct 2023

Pride, I think, is our greatest sin. I used to think it was greed, & that's a big problem, too, but pride in our big brains, thinking we control everything, that we're not like other animals who over populate & over consume, that we can make everything right if we screw up cuz we're so smart. Mother Nature is about to knock us down a few pegs. Too bad we're taking so much good with us.

SouthernDem4ever

(5,998 posts)
12. At one point wasn't the Amazon being raided for lumber?
Sun Oct 1, 2023, 11:45 AM
Oct 2023

I am sure that didn't help the climate change much either.

Lulu KC

(2,527 posts)
18. Lumber and then raising cattle
Sun Oct 1, 2023, 02:10 PM
Oct 2023

for hamburgers. The hide from those cows is used for our leather things--so many leather things--and collagen is extracted from it and sold in beauty products and powder for fitness shakes.

Of course, the effects of this on the humans in the area is devastating, too.

I just googled "Amazon cattle" and found a lot of info out there. https://www.fao.org/3/xii/0568-b1.htm

Lulu KC

(2,527 posts)
17. Thanks for posting this
Sun Oct 1, 2023, 02:04 PM
Oct 2023

--even though it's caused an emotional reaction in me that is so painful. I planted a native garden for pollinators in our front yard and it is at its peak of spectacularity (is that a word?) right now. I need to go hang out with the butterflies there for solace.

Another post right around the same time in the latest threads is about the Twin Cities Marathon being cancelled because of heat. Both stories are from CNN and I'm glad it's paying attention to these things and putting them out there.

What a time to be alive.

Native

(5,919 posts)
24. I was really on the fence about posting this. Checking the news each morning is really an exercise
Sun Oct 1, 2023, 09:33 PM
Oct 2023

in doom scrolling. Some days are much worse than others.

cstanleytech

(25,936 posts)
20. That's debatable as it has been a hell of a lot hotter in the past and with higher CO2 levels.
Sun Oct 1, 2023, 02:51 PM
Oct 2023

Mind you it could happen but I doubt that however we are polluting the oceans with our actions such as to much phosphorus from farming. That's creating dead zones in the ocean that are spreading and if it is not stopped we might end up killing to much of the world's plankton which provide most of the world's oxygen which we need if we want to keep breathing.

roamer65

(36,729 posts)
22. Cooking, versus cooked.
Sun Oct 1, 2023, 06:42 PM
Oct 2023

We are well on the way to rivaling Cretaceous temps.

It’s still in process, but I have my doubts if we have the determination to stop it.

cstanleytech

(25,936 posts)
23. Well geological cold phases like the one our planet has been in do not last forever so a climb to
Sun Oct 1, 2023, 08:24 PM
Oct 2023

higher temps is to be expected.
As to how high will get thats simply an unknown as South America was not connected to Central America back then but now they are which prevents the Pacific and Atlantic from directly interacting now.
Even if it would rise to those temps though its still a temp our species could survive if it has access to enough freshwater but what it cannot survive is a lack of enough oxygen.

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