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LiberatedUSA

(1,666 posts)
Sat Jan 22, 2022, 08:54 AM Jan 2022

Many New Gun Owners

A thought just occurred to me, a consequence of all the dead from COVID. A lot of gun collections are getting passed on to people that may not have experience with guns.

Just an observation, not making any other statement beyond that.

21 replies = new reply since forum marked as read
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Many New Gun Owners (Original Post) LiberatedUSA Jan 2022 OP
Nor will those inherited weapons be necessarily federally registered. no_hypocrisy Jan 2022 #1
Only Class 2 and Class 3 guns are federally registered to begin with NickB79 Jan 2022 #3
Here is my question on that. LiberatedUSA Jan 2022 #12
If the items are owned in a trust madville Jan 2022 #20
$200 tax is not required madville Jan 2022 #19
Almost none will be federally registered SYFROYH Jan 2022 #5
That is a huge problem for those unfamiliar. LiberatedUSA Jan 2022 #6
add me to the list, pro grade glue gun Shellback Squid Jan 2022 #2
"it holds 5 sticks"... is that legal? Is it an automatic or semi auto?😉..nt.. mitch96 Jan 2022 #15
No guns in my household, but my dad, as a flyer in WWII, had a Colt 1911 pistol issued to him. panader0 Jan 2022 #4
When my wife and I wanted to have children, she said I had to spike jones Jan 2022 #11
As it turns out my FIL died of COVID and we inherited an old S&w SYFROYH Jan 2022 #7
My WW2 era Pop "found" a flair gun that was used on a lifeboat. I got it when he died mitch96 Jan 2022 #16
That is very impressive SYFROYH Jan 2022 #21
Who needs 'em? (n/t) PJMcK Jan 2022 #8
On the average, they would fall into the hands of more responsible owners I would think. brewens Jan 2022 #9
Not everyone who dies of. covid is an idiot Hangingon Jan 2022 #13
There are different levels of idiocy, but an idiot is an idiot is an idiot. Antivaxers, for example Progressive Jones Jan 2022 #17
I look at it another way. llmart Jan 2022 #10
Maybe destroy them instead of putting them back in to circulation? maxsolomon Jan 2022 #14
That's what happened to all the old guns in my family... hunter Jan 2022 #18

NickB79

(19,224 posts)
3. Only Class 2 and Class 3 guns are federally registered to begin with
Sat Jan 22, 2022, 09:22 AM
Jan 2022

Those being short-barreled rifles, short-barreled shotguns, silencers, and machine guns.

There is no federal registry for regular rifles, shotguns or handguns to begin with.

And they can't be legally transfered to anyone without the proper paperwork. If my dad owned a legal machinegun, he can't just give it to me in his will, no questions asked. I'd have to fill out paperwork as if I were purchasing it myself, including the background check, ATF approval forms, and $200 tax stamp before take Ng possession of it.

 

LiberatedUSA

(1,666 posts)
12. Here is my question on that.
Sat Jan 22, 2022, 10:31 AM
Jan 2022

Are the feds, the ones responsible for keeping track of NFA items, notified when a person dies? Because the others in the house would now have immediate access to the weapon (s), explosives, suppressors, etc?

madville

(7,404 posts)
20. If the items are owned in a trust
Sat Jan 22, 2022, 06:02 PM
Jan 2022

The other family members in the house may already be co-trustees and the items simply stay with the trust and whoever is in it.

If the are owned directly by the individual, the items should be in possession of the executor of the will or estate until the designated beneficiary or heir is approved to take possession. They have to submit all the normal paperwork but can apply to have them transferred tax exempt, so no $200 fee per item again.

madville

(7,404 posts)
19. $200 tax is not required
Sat Jan 22, 2022, 05:57 PM
Jan 2022

NFA items registered to an individual can be willed to an heir tax free, it’s a Form 5 Application for Tax Exempt Transfer and Registration. They still have to submit the other paperwork for approval but don’t have to pay the $200 again.

If the item is owned in a trust, it simply remains in that trust and a co-trustee takes possession because they are already approved to be on the trust.

If there isn’t a living co-trustee on the trust, it would pass to a beneficiary and possibly also be eligible for the tax free transfer.




SYFROYH

(34,162 posts)
5. Almost none will be federally registered
Sat Jan 22, 2022, 09:23 AM
Jan 2022

Because there is no federal registry except for machine guns, short barreled long guns, and few others deemed dangerous.

panader0

(25,816 posts)
4. No guns in my household, but my dad, as a flyer in WWII, had a Colt 1911 pistol issued to him.
Sat Jan 22, 2022, 09:23 AM
Jan 2022

As a small boy, I "found" the pistol (unloaded) in his closet. My mom caught me and made my dad
get rid of it. I believe it would be valuable these days. I might be able to get a full set of tires for
my truck.....

spike jones

(1,674 posts)
11. When my wife and I wanted to have children, she said I had to
Sat Jan 22, 2022, 10:08 AM
Jan 2022

stop rock climbing, stop selling weed, and get rid of my rifle, a single shot 22. It was the best deal I ever made.

SYFROYH

(34,162 posts)
7. As it turns out my FIL died of COVID and we inherited an old S&w
Sat Jan 22, 2022, 09:28 AM
Jan 2022


Looks like this:


I have to get the one we received restored.

RIP

mitch96

(13,870 posts)
16. My WW2 era Pop "found" a flair gun that was used on a lifeboat. I got it when he died
Sat Jan 22, 2022, 01:26 PM
Jan 2022

It's a Remington manufacture. It was beautiful but one side had a bunch of rust on it. Took it to a gun smith and he redid the metal, got rid of the rust, blued the barrel and polished the brass. Best $150 I have spent in a while. It came out grand... I'm planing to put it in a presentation case with a glass front with a pic of my old man in his Navy uniform. It even came with a box of "new old stock" flares.. I think it will look cool on the wall..
m

brewens

(13,538 posts)
9. On the average, they would fall into the hands of more responsible owners I would think.
Sat Jan 22, 2022, 09:59 AM
Jan 2022

Considering it was a COVIDiot that died, the person inheriting the guns will occasionally be smarter.

llmart

(15,532 posts)
10. I look at it another way.
Sat Jan 22, 2022, 10:06 AM
Jan 2022

My children's father, who has OCD with hoarding disorder to boot, has an arsenal. He's not a well man (both physically and mentally), so probably doesn't have a whole lot of years left. Both of my grown kids have said that when he dies they are going to sell the entire lot of guns and donate the proceeds to the Brady organization. Neither one of them needs the money. Needless to say, I was pleased with their decision.

maxsolomon

(33,244 posts)
14. Maybe destroy them instead of putting them back in to circulation?
Sat Jan 22, 2022, 12:50 PM
Jan 2022

If they don't need the money...

hunter

(38,302 posts)
18. That's what happened to all the old guns in my family...
Sat Jan 22, 2022, 05:09 PM
Jan 2022

... they've long been melted down in electric arc furnaces to make rebar and other useful stuff.



My mom is a destroyer of guns. She wouldn't even sell collectibles.

The sole survivor of my Wild West family's guns is my grandfather's deer rifle, which my brother has. Like me, my brother hasn't been hunting in the 21st century. I don't think any of my grandfather's great-grandchildren will have any sentimental attachment to the gun. They've never hunted. That gun will probably end up in an arc furnace as well.


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