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Celerity

(44,526 posts)
Sat Dec 25, 2021, 10:49 PM Dec 2021

Booster shots protect against symptomatic Omicron infection for about 10 weeks, study finds -- which

could mean more doses for some in 2022

https://www.businessinsider.com/how-long-does-booster-protection-omicron-covid-last-study-2021-12?r=US&IR=T

Booster protection against symptomatic illness caused by the Omicron variant dropped by up to 25% within 10 weeks, new real-world data found — though it's not yet clear whether everyone may need further doses in 2022.

The UK Health Security Agency said protection against symptomatic COVID-19 caused by the variant dropped from 70% to 45% after a Pfizer booster for those initially vaccinated with the shot developed by Pfizer with BioNTech.

In the same analysis published on Thursday, the agency found the effectiveness of Moderna's booster paired with two doses of the Pfizer vaccine held at 70% to 75% for up to nine weeks, though not many people in the study received this regimen, which could affect the accuracy of the finding.

For those fully vaccinated with AstraZeneca's vaccine, booster effectiveness dropped from 60% to 35% with a Pfizer booster and to 45% with a Moderna booster after 10 weeks, the UKHSA said.

snip








Booster protection wanes against symptomatic Omicron infections, British data suggests.

https://www.nytimes.com/2021/12/23/health/booster-protection-omicron.html

New data from Britain suggests that booster protection against symptomatic Covid caused by the Omicron variant wanes within 10 weeks. There have not yet been enough severe cases of Omicron to calculate how well boosters protect against severe disease, but experts believe the shots will continue to provide significant protection against hospitalization and death. “It will be a few weeks before effectiveness against severe disease with Omicron can be estimated,” the new report, from Britain’s Health Security Agency, noted. “However, based on experience with previous variants, this is likely to be substantially higher than the estimates against symptomatic disease.”

In the weeks since Omicron was discovered, multiple studies have suggested that the variant is skilled at evading the antibodies that are produced after vaccination or after infection with the coronavirus. The new report from Britain, which included data on people who had received the AstraZeneca, Pfizer or Moderna shots, confirmed that the vaccines — both the initial two-shot series and booster doses — were less effective and waned faster against Omicron than against Delta.

Among people who received two doses of the AstraZeneca vaccine, a booster with one of the mRNA vaccines, made by Pfizer and Moderna, was 60 percent effective at preventing symptomatic disease two to four weeks after the shot. After 10 weeks, however, the Pfizer booster was just 35 percent effective. The Moderna booster was 45 percent effective at up to nine weeks. (The AstraZeneca vaccine is not authorized in the United States, but the Johnson & Johnson shot uses a similar technology.)

For people who were given three Pfizer doses, vaccine effectiveness dropped from 70 percent one week after the booster to 45 percent after 10 weeks. Pfizer recipients who received a Moderna booster, on the other hand, seemed to fare better; their vaccine regimen remained up to 75 percent effective at up to nine weeks.

snip
57 replies = new reply since forum marked as read
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Booster shots protect against symptomatic Omicron infection for about 10 weeks, study finds -- which (Original Post) Celerity Dec 2021 OP
Great, I'm 12 weeks out from my booster, WTF? dem4decades Dec 2021 #1
Me too. Just shy of 12 weeks. LuckyCharms Dec 2021 #3
So far everything Pfizer, next time Moderna. So are we protected? dem4decades Dec 2021 #6
you are still massively protected from serious disease and especially death compared to Celerity Dec 2021 #10
I'm already beyond the ten weeks with my booster. Back to square fucking one. onecaliberal Dec 2021 #2
Square one? How do you figure that? Mariana Dec 2021 #8
30% in my line of work is really fucking bad. onecaliberal Dec 2021 #14
Our boosters (Moderna) were Nov. 12 and 13. DFW Dec 2021 #4
Moderna booster received on Nov 30 so my 10 weeks expires on Feb 8. ARPad95 Dec 2021 #5
Moderna held at 75% at week 9. LisaL Dec 2021 #9
That's good! I'm a homebody anyway so not too worried about unnecessary exposure. ARPad95 Dec 2021 #11
Hopefully the FDA approves a 4th booster shot. roamer65 Dec 2021 #7
US Army working on 'master' coronavirus vaccine. radius777 Dec 2021 #12
+1000 Celerity Dec 2021 #13
If they could do that, it would actually finally justify their budget mvd Dec 2021 #17
This sounds promising Poiuyt Dec 2021 #19
That was not the expectation I had at all. KentuckyWoman Dec 2021 #15
wow NoRethugFriends Dec 2021 #23
Only about 30-31% of the vaccinated have gotten boosters so far. Ace Rothstein Dec 2021 #26
yes NoRethugFriends Dec 2021 #30
US Boosters are said to be delaying the rest of the World from getting their 1st & 2cd shots. Tommymac Dec 2021 #38
You have KentuckyWoman Dec 2021 #40
NoFriends that seems a little harsh. 48656c6c6f20 Dec 2021 #44
Some people have a reaction that makes them feel shitty for a day or two. Ace Rothstein Dec 2021 #45
No. hamsterjill Dec 2021 #35
Respirator is better? More comfortable? NoRethugFriends Dec 2021 #36
From your response, I see you have no understanding hamsterjill Dec 2021 #37
I do have empathy NoRethugFriends Dec 2021 #42
Again, you don't get it. hamsterjill Dec 2021 #46
Agree, the battle against Covid will be lost if something better doesn't come along then what's Raine Dec 2021 #56
Thanks. hamsterjill Dec 2021 #57
If you do get infected with omicron after being vaccinated, you should become LisaL Dec 2021 #24
Really? You really cannot deal with 30 minutes every two or three months??? USALiberal Dec 2021 #27
Here it's more like 2 hours. KentuckyWoman Dec 2021 #41
I've already had it. hamsterjill Dec 2021 #48
How do you do with bloodwork? Ace Rothstein Dec 2021 #50
I do better with bloodwork. hamsterjill Dec 2021 #51
An IV is the absolute worst. Ace Rothstein Dec 2021 #52
That's correct hamsterjill Dec 2021 #54
Sounds like another round of "boosters" is not far off. OK with that. Hoyt Dec 2021 #16
Scientists debating a 4 th vaxx for Israel - NYT womanofthehills Dec 2021 #25
Wonderful. Ms. Toad Dec 2021 #18
Read about this today.. totally get it - but still very disappointed. :( Laura PourMeADrink Dec 2021 #20
Did I miss something Karma13612 Dec 2021 #21
Just look at the hospitalizatoin and death statistics localroger Dec 2021 #22
Same, Moderna for all three oregonjen Dec 2021 #29
... Karma13612 Dec 2021 #31
My understanding is the shots don't do anything to stop transmission. KentuckyWoman Dec 2021 #43
Protection also drops off around 9 weeks, Ms. Toad Dec 2021 #55
Looks like I've got until bamagal62 Dec 2021 #28
I would wait until Karma13612 Dec 2021 #32
They don't have stats for all 3 Moderna doses. LisaL Dec 2021 #33
given the immune system's rapid decline in 'memory' after other coronaviruses, not surprising Amishman Dec 2021 #34
Getting symptomatic covid might be fine janterry Dec 2021 #39
I take this with a big grain of salt. Just one study. Need to know sample size,demographics, etc. triron Dec 2021 #47
so much is still preliminary RussBLib Dec 2021 #49
One study does not necessarily define things clearly. MineralMan Dec 2021 #53

Celerity

(44,526 posts)
10. you are still massively protected from serious disease and especially death compared to
Sat Dec 25, 2021, 11:35 PM
Dec 2021

non vaxxed.

Mariana

(14,870 posts)
8. Square one? How do you figure that?
Sat Dec 25, 2021, 11:29 PM
Dec 2021
There have not yet been enough severe cases of Omicron to calculate how well boosters protect against severe disease, but experts believe the shots will continue to provide significant protection against hospitalization and death.

onecaliberal

(33,410 posts)
14. 30% in my line of work is really fucking bad.
Sat Dec 25, 2021, 11:40 PM
Dec 2021

Also immunocompromised people don’t get as good protection, which my husband is. So added stress and continued vigilance. I’m really tired.

DFW

(54,908 posts)
4. Our boosters (Moderna) were Nov. 12 and 13.
Sat Dec 25, 2021, 10:56 PM
Dec 2021

We should be OK, though no guarantees, through the end of January.

radius777

(3,635 posts)
12. US Army working on 'master' coronavirus vaccine.
Sat Dec 25, 2021, 11:37 PM
Dec 2021

It's still in phase one testing but could end the pandemic if effective.

https://www.independent.co.uk/news/world/americas/us-army-covid-vaccine-spfn-b1980913.html
As the Biden administration ramps up its efforts to combat the Omicron variant of Covid-19, the US Army has announced a potential breakthrough in the fight against the virus: a new vaccine, still in trial, that may offer protection from all current variants.

Specifically, the Army claims that the shot “not only elicits a potent immune response but may also provide broad protection against SARS-CoV-2 variants of concern as well as other coronaviruses”.

If the optimism in the news proves well-founded, the vaccine could put the world on a very different footing when it comes to confronting new coronaviruses – and could potentially provide a level of protection against future Covid-19 variants as the virus continues to evolve.

https://www.defenseone.com/technology/2021/12/us-army-creates-single-vaccine-effective-against-all-covid-sars-variants/360089/
Within weeks, scientists at the Walter Reed Army Institute of Research expect to announce that they have developed a vaccine that is effective against COVID-19 and all its variants, even Omicron, as well as previous SARS-origin viruses that have killed millions of people worldwide.

The achievement is the result of almost two years of work on the virus. The Army lab received its first DNA sequencing of the COVID-19 virus in early 2020. Very early on, Walter Reed’s infectious diseases branch decided to focus on making a vaccine that would work against not just the existing strain but all of its potential variants as well. ...
Unlike existing vaccines, Walter Reed’s SpFN uses a soccer ball-shaped protein with 24 faces for its vaccine, which allows scientists to attach the spikes of multiple coronavirus strains on different faces of the protein.

KentuckyWoman

(6,709 posts)
15. That was not the expectation I had at all.
Sat Dec 25, 2021, 11:41 PM
Dec 2021

My threshold to put up with this is wearing pretty thin. While I'm hell bent on not being added trouble for the medical community, I don't know that I have the interest in going every 2 - 3 months for another shot for who knows how long. How I resolve that gap I don't know. Maybe wander off into the desert and let the coyotes have me.

NoRethugFriends

(2,450 posts)
23. wow
Sun Dec 26, 2021, 12:30 AM
Dec 2021

Having to get one shot every two or three months, if that's the case. Really way too much inconvenience to keep you from getting terribly sick or dying. Give me a break.

Ace Rothstein

(3,228 posts)
26. Only about 30-31% of the vaccinated have gotten boosters so far.
Sun Dec 26, 2021, 12:52 AM
Dec 2021

The vast majority of people aren't going to be OK with getting a shot every 2-3 months. Hopefully more effective vaccines are developed at some point.

NoRethugFriends

(2,450 posts)
30. yes
Sun Dec 26, 2021, 03:10 AM
Dec 2021

But that doesn't address the posters reluctance to put himself out for a few minutes every 2 or 3 months to protect himself and others. Wreaks of privilege or something. How dare the scientists not being able to cover everything for this person.

Tommymac

(7,263 posts)
38. US Boosters are said to be delaying the rest of the World from getting their 1st & 2cd shots.
Sun Dec 26, 2021, 10:58 AM
Dec 2021

The Booster is only needed by those at risk, i.e over 65 or with preexisting conditions.

It is a comfort to others, however from everything I've read the 2 doses (and if applicable the booster over 10 weeks old) should still give enough protection to prevent serious symptoms and hospitalization.

We need to let the rest of the world catch up if this thing is ever going to be gotten under control. The US is not an island.





Ace Rothstein

(3,228 posts)
45. Some people have a reaction that makes them feel shitty for a day or two.
Sun Dec 26, 2021, 12:47 PM
Dec 2021

Young, healthy people who aren't high risk from COVID are going to pass on boosters if they have to get them multiple times per year.

hamsterjill

(15,244 posts)
35. No.
Sun Dec 26, 2021, 09:30 AM
Dec 2021

For some of us, it’s high anxiety.

Getting injections is absolute terror for a lot of people.

Give us a break. This cannot continue indefinitely.

NoRethugFriends

(2,450 posts)
36. Respirator is better? More comfortable?
Sun Dec 26, 2021, 10:42 AM
Dec 2021

Get help for your needle anxiety
or
take a heavy-duty anxiety med once every three months.

What does "cannot continue indefinitely mean? What's your alternative?

hamsterjill

(15,244 posts)
37. From your response, I see you have no understanding
Sun Dec 26, 2021, 10:46 AM
Dec 2021

Perhaps no empathy.

I don’t think the majority of Americans are going to continue to get booster after booster after booster after booster. Most don’t get the flu shot.

Did you read the article earlier this week about the new developments in research at Walter Reed? Something like that is what I’m hoping for - preferably in a nasal vaccine route.

NoRethugFriends

(2,450 posts)
42. I do have empathy
Sun Dec 26, 2021, 11:58 AM
Dec 2021

I am skeptical about the Walter Reed thing, though it would be great.
And whether people will get the shot is not my point. It is the concept of getting a shot every three months being too much trouble.

hamsterjill

(15,244 posts)
46. Again, you don't get it.
Sun Dec 26, 2021, 12:51 PM
Dec 2021

It’s not about it being trouble. It’s about the absolute terror associated with it. Do you think that exists only for the few minutes that it takes to get the shot? No, it will be getting through it once and then knowing that you have to face it again in three months. Constant fear and panic all the time worrying about the next one. It is unbearable for a lot of people. Would you want to know that you’re going to faint every three months?

The UK has done a lot to deal with needle phobia and it’s time the US started acknowledging this and stopped shaming people who have it. It’s not a choice nor something that can be controlled. It’s not a choice. Much like many other life issues are not a choice.

We need to focus on more than just vaccines that have to be repeated and repeated, and people are going to start insisting on that. It’s time for some more and better steps forward in fighting this pandemic. It’s been over two years now. We can’t just stop with Pfizer and Moderna. I believe that American ingenuity can do more!

Raine

(30,565 posts)
56. Agree, the battle against Covid will be lost if something better doesn't come along then what's
Sun Dec 26, 2021, 05:06 PM
Dec 2021

being offered now.

hamsterjill

(15,244 posts)
57. Thanks.
Sun Dec 26, 2021, 05:52 PM
Dec 2021

I really do have faith in American scientists, and I want them to figure it out. If not American, then someone else in the world. That's the way it works. A problem necessitates a solution.

And we aren't there yet. I fear we've been stymied by the vast investment made in the initial vaccines. Do they all now need to be used because there was so much paid for them? They were emergency use, and they've been a godsend undeniably. But it's time for more now. The weary people (like me and many, many others) need a giant leap forward.

LisaL

(45,037 posts)
24. If you do get infected with omicron after being vaccinated, you should become
Sun Dec 26, 2021, 12:39 AM
Dec 2021

super immune. Better than being eaten by wolves.

KentuckyWoman

(6,709 posts)
41. Here it's more like 2 hours.
Sun Dec 26, 2021, 11:57 AM
Dec 2021

They are so short handed around here that shots, with an appointment, are taking about 2 hours of being in a crowded pharmacy... and god help us all if the link to Medicare goes down. Pharmacy staff is wearing out too.

The expectation was the booster would do it for the olders and the 2 shots were enough for the youngers. And children under 5 so unlikely to end up in a vent that vax isn't even needed. I can't imagine any of us had the expectation that in 2 months the protection of the Pfizer booster would dive off a cliff.

Oh I'll keep boosting up. You've read enough of my posts to know I'll do everything within my power to avoid being a burden on medical folks, covid or otherwise. I'm just saying if my stomach for this is wearing thin, as dedicated as I am, what is it going to be for those who are told to boost up and won't because they've had it. I'm not advocating for that, just being honest about what I think my fellow citizens will or will not do. At some point we will throw up our hands and collectively say "enough".





hamsterjill

(15,244 posts)
48. I've already had it.
Sun Dec 26, 2021, 12:56 PM
Dec 2021

If you read my responses up post, you’ll understand that I’m a needle phobe. I took the J&J because it was the “one and done”. It took everything I had to get through that one. I’ll do it again if I have to but I’ll be damned if I’m facing that horror every three months. I’ll just have to quarantine for the rest of my life I suppose.

Ace Rothstein

(3,228 posts)
50. How do you do with bloodwork?
Sun Dec 26, 2021, 01:04 PM
Dec 2021

I've gotten much better over the years but still hate it. Luckily the ladies at my local Quest always put me at ease and are very quick.

hamsterjill

(15,244 posts)
51. I do better with bloodwork.
Sun Dec 26, 2021, 01:11 PM
Dec 2021

There is one guy at my doctor’s office who is amazing. I can usually get by if I can get him and I’ve been known to come back a second time in order to get him.

An IV will put me on the floor.

I’ve tried therapy and it didn’t do much. I did learn some realistic coping methods that help a little. Took a Xanax for the COVID shot and managed to get through it, but I cannot and will not put myself through this every few months. It’s just damn time that someone somewhere figured this out and puts an end to it.

Ace Rothstein

(3,228 posts)
52. An IV is the absolute worst.
Sun Dec 26, 2021, 01:16 PM
Dec 2021

I hate how it feels after they put it in me. I had an emergency 10 years ago that kind of got me over my fears as I didn't have a choice in the matter.

I agree, hopefully a more effective vaccine comes along soon. People aren't going to go in for a shot 3-4 times per year in perpetuity, needle phobia or not. Especially those who are low risk to COVID or have reactions to the shots.

hamsterjill

(15,244 posts)
54. That's correct
Sun Dec 26, 2021, 01:26 PM
Dec 2021

Most people will not get shots regularly forever. At some point, it’ll get absurd and we will have to start asking why. As it is, people already question whether some of this is just about money for Pfizer.

It’s time for more advances on this situation. Time for medical science to produce more alternatives. The treatment option advances are promising. So let’s keep going and get this shit behind us.

I’m sorry, but my generation put a man on the moon. I refuse to dream small.

womanofthehills

(8,913 posts)
25. Scientists debating a 4 th vaxx for Israel - NYT
Sun Dec 26, 2021, 12:47 AM
Dec 2021

JERUSALEM — Israel is considering whether to approve a fourth Covid-19 vaccine dose for vulnerable people to contain the fast-spreading Omicron variant, despite debate among scientists and a lack of evidence either for or against another booster.

The panel of experts advising the Israeli government on the pandemic recognized that uncertainty, but on Tuesday it recommended giving a fourth dose, concluding that the potential benefits outweighed the risks. It pointed to signs of waning immunity a few months after the third shot, and said that any delay in additional doses might prove too late to protect those most at risk.

But some scientists warned that the plan could backfire, because too many shots might cause a sort of immune system fatigue, compromising the body’s ability to fight the coronavirus. A few members of the government’s advisory panel raised that concern with respect to the elderly, according to a written summary of the discussion obtained by The New York Times.


https://www.nytimes.com/2021/12/23/world/middleeast/israel-vaccine-4th-dose.html

Karma13612

(4,557 posts)
21. Did I miss something
Sun Dec 26, 2021, 12:16 AM
Dec 2021

In the report?

As someone who got Moderna all three doses, I am curious, did the test give stats for that??

I’m still wearing a mask despite the constant “you must be a Librul” stares.

I expect we will get annual COVID and Seasonal Flu shots each fall. Hopefully they can stick them in the same vial for us squeamish patients.

I’ve been feeling pretty well protected. Hope it isn’t a false sense of security!

localroger

(3,646 posts)
22. Just look at the hospitalizatoin and death statistics
Sun Dec 26, 2021, 12:26 AM
Dec 2021

Almost all those people are unvaccinated. You might get the virus, you might feel a little ill for a few days, and you might be able to spread it to others. But you probably won't end up in the ICU or die. If everyone had that level of protection, the disease would no longer be a threat. It's the unvaxxed idiots who are clogging up the ICU's and the morgues.

KentuckyWoman

(6,709 posts)
43. My understanding is the shots don't do anything to stop transmission.
Sun Dec 26, 2021, 12:01 PM
Dec 2021

The shots keep people out of ICU and morgues. That's it. It's the other stuff, masks, distance, good air flow, testing etc that will stop the spread. I hate that damn mask but I mask like it's a religion. If I get stares then who cares.

I got the flu shot and booster the same time - 2 shots. In fact she put them in the same arm.

Ms. Toad

(34,423 posts)
55. Protection also drops off around 9 weeks,
Sun Dec 26, 2021, 04:24 PM
Dec 2021

Although not as much as Pfizer at 10 weeks. But I expect it will show similar stats once there are enough people who have been boosted for 10+ weeks. Remember - approval for the Moderna booster came after Pfizer, so there is a much smaller population which has been vaccinated for 10+ weeks.

Karma13612

(4,557 posts)
32. I would wait until
Sun Dec 26, 2021, 06:44 AM
Dec 2021

Hearing what the CDC and the NIH or other Federal agency(s) recommend as far as boosters. I am wearing my mask despite the political fallout.

These initial reports seem to always jump the gun and do more harm than good.

And they didn’t even give stats on those of us that got Moderna for all 3 doses.

LisaL

(45,037 posts)
33. They don't have stats for all 3 Moderna doses.
Sun Dec 26, 2021, 08:04 AM
Dec 2021

The study is from Israel. The first two doses from Israel was Pfizer exclusively.

Amishman

(5,571 posts)
34. given the immune system's rapid decline in 'memory' after other coronaviruses, not surprising
Sun Dec 26, 2021, 08:40 AM
Dec 2021

i mean the collection of viruses that collectively are called the common cold includes several coronaviruses. A long lasting vaccine was never particularly likely

 

janterry

(4,429 posts)
39. Getting symptomatic covid might be fine
Sun Dec 26, 2021, 11:03 AM
Dec 2021

It's severe covid that we want to avoid. If the boosters don't protect against severe illness - then we have a problem. A somewhat mild case - well. Covid is here to stay. That's going to happen to most of us at some point.

RussBLib

(9,123 posts)
49. so much is still preliminary
Sun Dec 26, 2021, 12:59 PM
Dec 2021

....that's the nature of science and scientific discovery.

up, down, sideways, so much data...

I'm prepared for a 4th, 5th, booster, whatever. I've probably had 40 flu shots over the years, even if only once per year. 2-4 Covid boosters a year? I'm there.

MineralMan

(146,413 posts)
53. One study does not necessarily define things clearly.
Sun Dec 26, 2021, 01:26 PM
Dec 2021

I note that this story came from businessinsider.com as well. I'm skeptical of that source to some degree.

I think I'll wait a bit before getting panicky.

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