HomeLatest ThreadsGreatest ThreadsForums & GroupsMy SubscriptionsMy Posts
DU Home » Latest Threads » Forums & Groups » Main » General Discussion (Forum) » CAN OUR NAVY SHIPS PLEASE...

Wed Feb 6, 2019, 09:35 PM

CAN OUR NAVY SHIPS PLEASE STOP RUNNING INTO THINGS

https://www.military.com/daily-news/2019/02/05/no-injuries-after-navy-ships-collide-east-coast.html

A Ticonderoga-class guided-missile cruiser and a dry cargo ship collided stern-to-stern during a resupply operation in the Atlantic off the southeastern coast of the U.S., the Navy announced Tuesday.

The cruiser Leyte Gulf and cargo ship Robert E. Peary "made contact" during an underway replenishment operation, Navy officials said in a release. No personnel were injured, and both ships were able to operate following the encounter.

The news of the collision was first reported by USNI News, which added that damage was minor and occurred at the waterline.

The incident happened around 4 p.m. Tuesday; the ships are now headed into port at Norfolk to assess damage, according to the release.


Thank God nobody was hurt this time but seriously. Can we please stop?

39 replies, 1930 views

Reply to this thread

Back to top Alert abuse

Always highlight: 10 newest replies | Replies posted after I mark a forum
Replies to this discussion thread
Arrow 39 replies Author Time Post
Reply CAN OUR NAVY SHIPS PLEASE STOP RUNNING INTO THINGS (Original post)
Recursion Feb 2019 OP
jberryhill Feb 2019 #1
Blue_true Feb 2019 #5
denbot Feb 2019 #26
Achilleaze Feb 2019 #29
fescuerescue Feb 2019 #36
tinymontgomery Feb 2019 #2
Blue_true Feb 2019 #4
ooky Feb 2019 #8
Blue_true Feb 2019 #13
tinymontgomery Feb 2019 #18
ooky Feb 2019 #23
ooky Feb 2019 #7
JustABozoOnThisBus Feb 2019 #34
ooky Feb 2019 #37
JustABozoOnThisBus Feb 2019 #38
ooky Feb 2019 #39
sl8 Feb 2019 #3
Blue_true Feb 2019 #6
sl8 Feb 2019 #9
Blue_true Feb 2019 #16
keithbvadu2 Feb 2019 #10
Blue_true Feb 2019 #17
keithbvadu2 Feb 2019 #20
denbot Feb 2019 #27
UTUSN Feb 2019 #11
Chichiri Feb 2019 #12
hardluck Feb 2019 #14
yortsed snacilbuper Feb 2019 #15
pansypoo53219 Feb 2019 #19
denbot Feb 2019 #21
ooky Feb 2019 #24
denbot Feb 2019 #25
hack89 Feb 2019 #31
Demonaut Feb 2019 #22
democratisphere Feb 2019 #28
PJMcK Feb 2019 #30
hack89 Feb 2019 #32
Beausoleil Feb 2019 #35
panader0 Feb 2019 #33

Response to Recursion (Original post)

Wed Feb 6, 2019, 09:45 PM

1. Good golly


Does anyone manage to keep their command after something like this?

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to jberryhill (Reply #1)

Wed Feb 6, 2019, 10:02 PM

5. Could personal electronic devices be playing a role? nt

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to Blue_true (Reply #5)

Thu Feb 7, 2019, 04:52 AM

26. T-Mobile does not cover the deep blue.

LoL

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to jberryhill (Reply #1)

Thu Feb 7, 2019, 08:53 AM

29. Tuff when your "commander-in-chief" is a five-time republican draft dodger

the republican drags down everything he's associated with.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to jberryhill (Reply #1)

Thu Feb 7, 2019, 11:36 AM

36. They don't

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to Recursion (Original post)

Wed Feb 6, 2019, 09:54 PM

2. 23 years in and have never seen

23 years in the navy and have never heard of so many navy ship
collisions in such a short period of time. I was involved in two during my time.
11 years as a navy quartermaster and 12 LDO as a navy bridge watch stander, Officer of the Deck.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to tinymontgomery (Reply #2)

Wed Feb 6, 2019, 10:01 PM

4. How does a Navy Watch play out.

How many people are involved, and if you can, where are they positioned and how do they communicate?

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to Blue_true (Reply #4)

Wed Feb 6, 2019, 10:11 PM

8. There are all kinds of watches for a ship underway at sea.

Fireroom watches, bridge watches, CIC (combat information center) watches, etc. Usually the ones I was involved in were 4 hours long and either on the bridge or in CIC.

Typical bridge watch is an OOD (officer of the deck), quartermaster, helmsman, someone tracking contacts (other ships and their relative positions to ours), starboard and port watches. Communications through headphones to remote locations to the bridge, i.e CIC, signal bridge etc.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to ooky (Reply #8)

Wed Feb 6, 2019, 10:29 PM

13. Thanks. nt

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to Blue_true (Reply #4)

Wed Feb 6, 2019, 11:06 PM

18. OOKY pretty much nailed it

With just a few minor changes in watches on how a ship establishes their watches OOKY nailed it. Refueling at sea is
an exact science and great ship handling. Ships get known on how their professional
ship handling skills are. There's some decent videos on refueling under way (u/w) on navy ships
on you tube, check them out. It is a precise event, even science is involved, understanding the Venturi effect
is crucial.

refueling u/w helped us win in the pacific during WW2.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to tinymontgomery (Reply #18)

Thu Feb 7, 2019, 01:06 AM

23. Yep, replenishment details are more sophisticated, can go much longer,

Ships are running same course and speed while our oil rigs are pumping oil (and aviation gasoline in the case of aircraft carriers.)

The ship's captain took over the bridge for these details.

For a frame reference for interested land lubbers, typical hook up here, in a picture taken from my old ship.

http://navy.memorieshop.com/Mississinewa/Portsmouth-Bound.html

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to tinymontgomery (Reply #2)

Wed Feb 6, 2019, 10:07 PM

7. I was in the Navy for 4 years and involved in two collisions.

The second in which we collided with an aircraft carrier, causing the ship to be retired from the fleet. But, I should add that I was on an oiler, so we were involved in a lot of underway replenishment details.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to ooky (Reply #7)

Thu Feb 7, 2019, 11:19 AM

34. "...causing the ship to be retired from the fleet"

Uh, which ship had to be retired? Hopefully, it was the oiler, and hopefully there were no severe injuries or worse.

Were there repercussions? Did the captain get forced to retire? Or is there some forgiveness during that tricky maneuver?

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to JustABozoOnThisBus (Reply #34)

Thu Feb 7, 2019, 12:23 PM

37. Sure

My ship, the USS Mississinewa, was retired as a Navy war ship following the accident due to the amount of sustained damage in the collision. There were no severe injuries. Our crew were all transferred to new commands. It is my understanding our captain was court martialed. I do not know the outcome of that.

Here is a photograph of the damage to the forward superstructure of the ship following the accident. It was substantial.

http://navy.memorieshop.com/Mississinewa/Saratoga-2.html

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to ooky (Reply #37)

Thu Feb 7, 2019, 12:58 PM

38. It appears that the Saratoga had some sort of jinx.

Three collisions. I don't know if that's a record. Combined with the other mishaps, it looks like a less-than-stellar career..

http://www.damagecontrolmuseums.org/Ship_Cas_history/SARATOGA/SARATOGA_n.html

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to JustABozoOnThisBus (Reply #38)

Thu Feb 7, 2019, 01:18 PM

39. Ironically, for me

when I was transferred from the Mississinewa my new orders were to a helicopter squadron which was, you guessed it, aboard the Saratoga.

I think these collisions are more frequent than people know. As I previously mentioned I was in two while on the Mississinewa over about a 2 and a half year period, the first one unpublicized, which was a mere "bump" that fortunately didn't result in any damage. But it was a collision.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to Recursion (Original post)

Wed Feb 6, 2019, 09:59 PM

3. UNREPs can be pretty tricky.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to sl8 (Reply #3)

Wed Feb 6, 2019, 10:03 PM

6. How is that? Not debating, just curious. nt

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to Blue_true (Reply #6)

Wed Feb 6, 2019, 10:16 PM

9. You have to match course and speed with 1 or 2 other ships while tied together in close proximity.

Imagine driving alongside a car in the next lane on the freeway. Now, tie yourself to the other car and maintain an 8-10 foot gap for 30 minutes or so. If you're feeling adventurous , do the same with the car on the other side, simultaneously. It's kind of like that, except ships also have to deal with unpredictable waves pushing them together or apart. It's quite an evolution.


Wikipedia has an article on the procedure:
https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Underway_replenishment

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to sl8 (Reply #9)

Wed Feb 6, 2019, 10:58 PM

16. Thanks. The information was interesting.

Must be a wild time on all decks that are involved in the operation, since the weights involved seem to require lifts for replenishment of non fuel items.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to Blue_true (Reply #6)

Wed Feb 6, 2019, 10:17 PM

10. They require very precise control of speed and steering.

They require very precise control of speed and steering.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to keithbvadu2 (Reply #10)

Wed Feb 6, 2019, 10:59 PM

17. I saw a graphic and read a description. Pretty interesting.

I can understand better why ships can collide.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to Blue_true (Reply #17)

Wed Feb 6, 2019, 11:40 PM

20. Aircraft carrier off coast of Alaska, winter, very cold. Rougher than snot.

Aircraft carrier off coast of Alaska, winter, very cold.
Rougher than snot.
Had to quit flight ops because breaking aircraft struts on landing.
Refueled a Canadian destroyer alongside.
We were jumping around.
They were bobbing all up and down and sideways.
All dressed in foul weather gear, yellow slickers and life jackets.
All except one guy who was doing absolutely nothing and I would not want his job.
Dressed in a wet suit.
He was the swimmer.
If someone fell overboard, guess who was second?

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to keithbvadu2 (Reply #20)

Thu Feb 7, 2019, 04:57 AM

27. Nice..

That could be put to music in the gut of damn near any remote pierside dive.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to Recursion (Original post)

Wed Feb 6, 2019, 10:20 PM

11. Since I are one, the expression "-------- sailor" comes to mind

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to Recursion (Original post)

Wed Feb 6, 2019, 10:26 PM

12. Are ship collisions endemic in the Navy of late?

That would be news to me . . .

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink



Response to Recursion (Original post)


Response to Recursion (Original post)

Wed Feb 6, 2019, 11:37 PM

19. not getting the training they used too. this is getting $$$$.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to Recursion (Original post)

Thu Feb 7, 2019, 12:38 AM

21. Stern to stern sounds odd

I rode a tin can (Guided Missle Destroyer) and every at sea replenish was side by side.

I donít recall a major collision during my service, but we did close pretty close to a Oiler during a refueling. Our station was on the starboard side and watching that ship close in was a bit unnerving.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to denbot (Reply #21)

Thu Feb 7, 2019, 01:27 AM

24. Unnerving is a good description of watching

that Carrier hit the port side of our oiler and then drift backward over our forward superstructure toward where I was standing on our bridge, knocking down everything in its path.

What it looked like when it was over, you can see the twisted metal that was our gun mounts.

http://navy.memorieshop.com/Mississinewa/Saratoga-2.html

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to ooky (Reply #24)

Thu Feb 7, 2019, 04:45 AM

25. Yeah, fuck that.

I was an OS3 at the time, so I still had to do refueling duty on the O1 deck right next to our torpedo tubes. We had already swapped paint with a Kassion Class rust bucket off Mombasa, not scary, it just pissed everyone off.

Watching 80k tons of oiler get so close that we cut lines, spewing fuel oil, and going flank speed to breakaway, is nowhere near the the Belknap pucker, but that shit ran through everyone on that deckís mind, whether or not think any of us would have admitted to it at that time.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to denbot (Reply #21)

Thu Feb 7, 2019, 09:20 AM

31. I suspect that the CG swung his stern into the oiler as they breaking away

could have been an emergency break away.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to Recursion (Original post)

Thu Feb 7, 2019, 12:42 AM

22. unreps are difficult and risky, ships run side by side for miles to transfer weapon's,fuel and food

Delta unreps are the most difficult

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to Recursion (Original post)

Thu Feb 7, 2019, 07:59 AM

28. Perhaps they shouldn't do this while underway.

Seems like a high probability for an accident waiting to happen.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to democratisphere (Reply #28)

Thu Feb 7, 2019, 09:15 AM

30. There aren't any filling stations at sea (n/t)

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to democratisphere (Reply #28)

Thu Feb 7, 2019, 09:23 AM

32. Warships have to fuel every four or five days when at sea

we have been doing refueling at sea for 70 years. It is the reason we won the war in the Pacific during WWII and it is the reason we can deploy ships anywhere in the world.

The accident rate is very low. In my 20 years in the navy, I did nearly 50 underway replenishment without a collision.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to democratisphere (Reply #28)

Thu Feb 7, 2019, 11:35 AM

35. I was on a replenishment oiler for almost 2 years

Was involved in dozens of unreps. This ship was an AOR; we carried jet fuel, deisel oil, stores and ammo, so we supplied all of that to ships while underway. The ship was designed specifically for unreps. We were like a floating convenience store. We were told that if the ship had a fire emergency while underway, we would radio all other ships in the area, not for assistance, but to let them know to leave the area.

Everyone involved appreciated the dangers and everything was very well controlled. If the seas were too heavy, we did not perform underway replenishment operations.

We never had any collisions, but we did have a couple of emergency breakaways.

The ship did have a couple of "accidents" (due to human error); we ran into the dock when pulling in to Pearl Harbor and we also ran aground coming into San Diego harbor. The navigator lost his commission over that one.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to Recursion (Original post)

Thu Feb 7, 2019, 09:37 AM

33. The responses here are very interesting.

Thanks to all of you sailors. And wow!

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink

Reply to this thread