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Sat Jul 7, 2018, 09:02 AM

The famous La Marseillaise scene from Casablanca.



pyrrhiccomedy

You know, this scene is so powerful to me that sometimes I forget that not everyone who watches it will understand its significance, or will have seen Casablanca. So, because this scene means so much to me, I hope it’s okay if I take a minute to explain what’s going on here for anyone who’s feeling left out.

Casablanca takes place in, well, Casablanca, the largest city in (neutral) Morocco in 1941, at Rick’s American Cafe (Rick is Humphrey Bogart’s character you see there). In 1941, America was also still neutral, and Rick’s establishment is open to everyone: Nazi German officials, officials from Vichy (occupied) France, and refugees from all across Europe desperate to escape the German war engine. A neutral cafe in a netural country is probably the only place you’d have seen a cross-section like this in 1941, only six months after the fall of France.

So, the scene opens with Rick arguing with Laszlo, who is a Czech Resistance fighter fleeing from the Nazis (if you’re wondering what they’re arguing about: Rick has illegal transit papers which would allow Laszlo and his wife, Ilsa, to escape to America, so he could continue raising support against the Germans. Rick refuses to sell because he’s in love with Laszlo’s wife). They’re interrupted by that cadre of German officers singing Die Wacht am Rhein: a German patriotic hymn which was adopted with great verve by the Nazi regime, and which is particularly steeped in anti-French history. This depresses the hell out of everybody at the club, and infuriates Laszlo, who storms downstairs and orders the house band to play La Marseillaise: the national anthem of France.

Wait, but when I say “it’s the national anthem of France,” I don’t want you to think of your national anthem, okay? Wherever you’re from. Because France’s anthem isn’t talking about some glorious long-ago battle, or France’s beautiful hills and countrysides. La Marseillaise is FUCKING BRUTAL. Here’s a translation of what they’re singing:

Arise, children of the Fatherland! The day of glory has arrived! Against us, tyranny raises its bloody banner. Do you hear, in the countryside, the roar of those ferocious soldiers? They’re coming to your land to cut the throats of your women and children!

To arms, citizens! Form your battalions! Let’s march, let’s march! Let their impure blood water our fields!


BRUTAL, like I said. DEFIANT, in these circumstances. And the entire cafe stands up and sings it passionately, drowning out the Germans. The Germans who are, in 1941, still terrifyingly ascendant, and seemingly invincible.

“Vive la France! Vive la France!” the crowd cries when it’s over. France has already been defeated, the German war machine roars on, and the people still refuse to give up hope.

But here’s the real kicker, for me: Casablanca came out in 1942. None of this was ‘history’ to the people who first saw it. Real refugees from the Nazis, afraid for their lives, watched this movie and took heart. These were current events when this aired. Victory over Germany was still far from certain. The hope it gave to people then was as desperately needed as it has been at any time in history.

God I love this scene.


freekicks

not only did refugees see this movie, real refugees made this movie. most of the european cast members wound up in hollywood after fleeing the nazis and wound up.

paul heinreid, who played laszlo the resistance leader, was a famous austrian actor; he was so anti-hitler that he was named an enemy of the reich. ugarte, the petty thief who stole the illegal transit papers laszlo and victor are arguing about? was played by peter lorre, a jewish refugee. carl, the head waiter? played by s.z. sakall, a hungarian-jew whose three sisters died in the holocaust.

even the main nazi character was played by a german refugee: conrad veidt, who starred in one of the first sympathetic films about gay men and who fled the nazis with his jewish wife.

there’s one person in this scene that deserves special mention. did you notice the woman at the bar, on the verge of tears as she belts out la marseillaise? she’s yvonne, rick’s ex-girlfriend in the film. in real life, the actress’s name is madeleine lebeau and she basically lived the plot of this film: she and her jewish husband fled paris ahead of the germans in 1940. her husband, macel dalio, is also in the film, playing the guy working the roulette table. after they occupied paris, the nazis used his face on posters to represent a “typical jew.” madeleine and marcel managed to get to lisbon (the goal of all the characters in casablanca), and boarded a ship to the americas… but then they were stranded for two months when it turned out their visa papers were forgeries. they eventually entered the US after securing temporary canadian visas. marcel dalio’s entire family died in concentration camps.

go back and rewatch the clip. watch madeleine lebeau’s face.







casablanca is a classic, full of classic acting performances. but in this moment, madeleine lebeau isn’t acting. this isn’t yvonne the jilted lover onscreen. this is madeleine lebeau, singing “la marseillaise” after she and her husband fled france for their lives. this is a real-life refugee, her real agony and loss and hope and resilience, preserved in the midst of one of the greatest films of all time.

http://notmypresidentno.tumblr.com/post/175638713168/thebibliosphere-blood-on-my-french-fries

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Reply The famous La Marseillaise scene from Casablanca. (Original post)
MrScorpio Jul 2018 OP
Zoonart Jul 2018 #1
olegramps Jul 2018 #20
Maeve Jul 2018 #2
BlueMTexpat Jul 2018 #3
oasis Jul 2018 #4
localroger Jul 2018 #5
lamsmy Jul 2018 #6
dhol82 Jul 2018 #7
greatauntoftriplets Jul 2018 #8
CanonRay Jul 2018 #9
lark Jul 2018 #10
BeyondGeography Jul 2018 #11
winstars Jul 2018 #55
nuxvomica Jul 2018 #12
Richard D Jul 2018 #13
bronxiteforever Jul 2018 #14
WinstonSmith4740 Jul 2018 #15
mehrrh Jul 2018 #16
mountain grammy Jul 2018 #17
Duppers Jul 2018 #18
dalton99a Jul 2018 #19
mulsh Jul 2018 #21
Moral Compass Jul 2018 #22
gademocrat7 Jul 2018 #23
thucythucy Jul 2018 #24
malthaussen Jul 2018 #30
thucythucy Jul 2018 #31
Historic NY Jul 2018 #25
Mendocino Jul 2018 #26
malthaussen Jul 2018 #27
BobTheSubgenius Jul 2018 #28
Siwsan Jul 2018 #29
stevenleser Jul 2018 #32
ismnotwasm Jul 2018 #33
RandomAccess Jul 2018 #34
Cyrano Jul 2018 #35
Bradshaw3 Jul 2018 #36
jeffreyi Jul 2018 #37
Pluvious Jul 2018 #38
ewagner Jul 2018 #39
appalachiablue Jul 2018 #40
kag Jul 2018 #50
appalachiablue Jul 2018 #51
nycbos Jul 2018 #41
smirkymonkey Jul 2018 #42
bucolic_frolic Jul 2018 #43
keithbvadu2 Jul 2018 #53
bucolic_frolic Jul 2018 #54
TygrBright Jul 2018 #44
Ghost of Tom Joad Jul 2018 #45
BigmanPigman Jul 2018 #46
kag Jul 2018 #47
Lithos Jul 2018 #48
apkhgp Jul 2018 #49
kag Jul 2018 #52
SwissTony Jul 2018 #56
N_E_1 for Tennis Jul 2018 #57
Raven123 Jul 2018 #58
dae Jul 2018 #59

Response to MrScorpio (Original post)

Sat Jul 7, 2018, 09:07 AM

1. Thanks, Scorpio...

for posting this. This scene gets me every time as does the refrain at the end of the movie. Cry every time.

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Response to Zoonart (Reply #1)

Sat Jul 7, 2018, 10:44 AM

20. Thanks. I really appreciated the information.

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Response to MrScorpio (Original post)

Sat Jul 7, 2018, 09:08 AM

2. Chills and tears eom

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Response to MrScorpio (Original post)

Sat Jul 7, 2018, 09:11 AM

3. It's one of my favorite

movie scenes ever! Thanks for posting this, MrS!

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Response to MrScorpio (Original post)

Sat Jul 7, 2018, 09:16 AM

4. A "behind the scenes" story that is both inspiring and sad.

Thanks for reviving my interest in the film.

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Response to MrScorpio (Original post)

Sat Jul 7, 2018, 09:16 AM

5. Timely and timeless. Thanks /nt

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Response to MrScorpio (Original post)

Sat Jul 7, 2018, 09:18 AM

6. Thank you

Wow - It's a good day when you learn more about depth complexities of the seemingly simple and familiar.

Wonderful post.

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Response to MrScorpio (Original post)

Sat Jul 7, 2018, 09:22 AM

7. Makes me cry every time.

Such an amazing movie!
I shudder when I think about the fact that Reagan was the first choice to play Rick.

Only other song that affects me so much is, “Tomorrow Belongs To Me.”
Sort of the opposite end of the spectrum.

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Response to MrScorpio (Original post)

Sat Jul 7, 2018, 09:47 AM

8. Thanks for reminding me to order the DVD of this wonderful movie.

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Response to MrScorpio (Original post)

Sat Jul 7, 2018, 09:57 AM

9. Great post, thank you.

Bookmarked and saved

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Response to MrScorpio (Original post)

Sat Jul 7, 2018, 10:02 AM

10. Wow, thanks, I never knew all this back story.

It makes the movie so much more moving and poignant. Watching the clip I was struck by the intense feelings she showed, now I know why and appreciate her soooo much more. I need to watch this again with these new truths in mind. Folks, this is us if we let drumpf and russia steal the mid-terms. We're going to need extraordinary efforts to overwhelm their vote stealing and hacking, because if we thought 2016 was bad in terms of nefarious illegal efforts, just wait, the next will be worse because now they know they can do it.

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Response to MrScorpio (Original post)

Sat Jul 7, 2018, 10:04 AM

11. Madeleine Lebeau

Only died a couple of years ago, just shy of her 93rd birthday.

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Response to BeyondGeography (Reply #11)

Sun Jul 8, 2018, 06:48 AM

55. Yes, I believe she was the last living cast member. And yes, my eyes tear up EVERY TIME too!!!

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Response to MrScorpio (Original post)

Sat Jul 7, 2018, 10:06 AM

12. Casablanca has been on mind so much lately

I know someone who was naturalized as a baby and these days he makes sure he has his papers available at all times as there are reports Border Patrol is now stopping people randomly. When I first saw Casablanca I was probably around 10 and I loved it even though I didn't understand all of it. What I did understand: I was so lucky to live in a place and time where people didn't ask for your papers. That seemed horrifying to me, that a person''s freedom depended on a piece of paper.

Critic Andrew Sarris, a proponent of the auteur theory of cinema, which claims that a film should be seen as the fulfillment of it's director's personal vision, called Casablanca the greatest argument against that theory, a masterpiece created by an ensemble. It's no wonder that the flm's magic still enthralls me as every member of that ensemble brought their A-game to fight fascism in a sound studio.

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Response to MrScorpio (Original post)

Sat Jul 7, 2018, 10:11 AM

13. The only movie I have watched more than 5 times

I will have even greater appreciation for it next time. Thank you.

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Response to MrScorpio (Original post)

Sat Jul 7, 2018, 10:11 AM

14. Wonderful. kick and recommend

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Response to MrScorpio (Original post)

Sat Jul 7, 2018, 10:15 AM

15. Absolutely!

Also, my all time favorite scene from my all time favorite movie, and watching it was an anniversary tradition. I've lost count of the number of times I've seen it, and that scene, and of course, the very end, always brings me to my feet.

I did not, however, know the translation of "La Marseillaise", and yeah, talk about a throwdown! Also, while I knew about Veidt and Lorre, had no idea as to the refugee history of the rest of the cast. Always suspected that was more than acting on LeBeau's part. Thanks so much for posting this.

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Response to MrScorpio (Original post)

Sat Jul 7, 2018, 10:16 AM

16. thank you

thanks for this

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Response to MrScorpio (Original post)

Sat Jul 7, 2018, 10:37 AM

17. Beautiful!

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Response to MrScorpio (Original post)

Sat Jul 7, 2018, 10:41 AM

18. Wow! Thank you so much.

I was unaware of all the background and the actors' history in this scene.

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Response to MrScorpio (Original post)

Sat Jul 7, 2018, 10:43 AM

19. Kick

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Response to MrScorpio (Original post)

Sat Jul 7, 2018, 10:47 AM

21. Bear in mind the French male poulation was decimated by two previous wars, the Franco Prussian,

and the Great War, both wars against Germanic aggressors. Vichy was a German quisling government.

At a personal level, the few times French friends have discovered I have a few Irish and Irish American ancestors buried in French battle field cemeteries my friends have been effusively grateful. Some even tearing up.

Here's a link to to a side by side French - English translation of La Marseillaise

[link:https://www.thoughtco.com/la-marseillaise-frances-national-anthem-4080565|

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Response to MrScorpio (Original post)

Sat Jul 7, 2018, 10:52 AM

22. Thank you

Wow. Didn’t know any of that. Already one of my favorite movies. Will watch now with more understanding.

You’ve made a great movie even better.

Thank you.

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Response to MrScorpio (Original post)

Sat Jul 7, 2018, 10:55 AM

23. Excellent, Mr. Scorpio!

Classic film.

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Response to MrScorpio (Original post)

Sat Jul 7, 2018, 10:57 AM

24. Also a favorite scene and movie of mine BUT

I wish it didn't pamper to American racism the way it did.

I mean specifically the scenes with Dooley Wilson, an amazing musician and actor. Notice how he addresses everyone white as "Mr." or "Miss" but is always called by his first name? And when Ilse first walks into the café, she asks "Who is the boy at the piano?" The BOY??? I always cringe at that. Ugh.

Also, the Claude Rains character "Louie" is a creep, even if he ends up being on the right side. I mean, the man is basically coercing women into having sex with him in return for the exit visas they need to save their lives. And everyone, including Rick, knows about it. Probably reflects the reality of the times (and of course shit like this still happens today) but seeing a character who is, essentially, a serial rapist being portrayed so sympathetically always makers me wince.

Otherwise the movie is perfect. One thing I love about it is that it assumes its audience has intelligence and some understanding of (then) current events. As when Louie throws his bottle of Vichy water into the trash. And the opening scene, where a refugee without papers is shot down by collaborationist French police under a banner that reads "Liberty, Equality, Fraternity" always sends chills down my spine.

I can't tell you how many times I've seen this movie--probably more times than any other in my life.

Thank you for posting this.

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Response to thucythucy (Reply #24)

Sat Jul 7, 2018, 11:10 AM

30. But they weren't catering to racism.

That was the way it was in 1942. Practically nobody thought it was bad, except perhaps every black person in the US, who weren't writing many scripts then.

Claude Rains does play a very charming creep. It is a bit bothersome that his behavior is basically "redeemed" when he decides to join the Resistance. Hey, dude, we don't care how many desperate women you rape as long as you throw the Vichy water in the trash at the end.

-- Mal

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Response to malthaussen (Reply #30)

Sat Jul 7, 2018, 11:16 AM

31. I think it's the "boy" line that bothers me most.

And to have that spoken by a Norwegian anti-Nazi makes it even more blatant.

It's true that everyone calls Rick "Monsieur Rick" or "Boss" -- which is what Sam calls him.

It still rankles though. Especially in a film that is otherwise absolutely stellar. There are so many great moments. All the scenes with Pete Lorre are hold.

Lorre: "I thought--"

Bogart: "You thought what?"

Lorre: "What right have I to think?"

The delivery is perfect. Or Ilsa's "Oh" when they're told Ugate is dead.

Louie: "We're making out the death certificate now. We haven't decided whether it was suicide or shot while trying to escape."

Absolutely chilling.

I could go on and on...

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Response to MrScorpio (Original post)

Sat Jul 7, 2018, 11:04 AM

25. I had a friend who as a boy was in the Maquis....

they came to the US post war yrs.

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Response to MrScorpio (Original post)

Sat Jul 7, 2018, 11:04 AM

26. The only credited Americans

in the cast were Bogart, Dooley Wilson (Sam) and Joy Page. She was with the young couple fleeing from Bulgaria. Despite the international feel, the picture was made in Hollywood backlots, some scenes in the Van Nuys airport and Flagstaff AZ.

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Response to MrScorpio (Original post)

Sat Jul 7, 2018, 11:05 AM

27. That adds a lot to an already great scene...

... in what is, arguably, already the greatest film ever.

-- Mal

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Response to MrScorpio (Original post)

Sat Jul 7, 2018, 11:05 AM

28. One of the agents dropped into France to form resistance groups and train men was,,,

spectacularly successful. By the time D Day rolled around, he had affiliated groups of French freedom fighters that totaled 10,000.

The French were not "cheese-eating surrender monkeys" in the slightest. Of course there were collaborators - every horrible cause has adherents - but I believe they did the right thing in surrendering after Germany bypassed the Maginot Line, but before their country was decimated. That came later.

In the meantime, they had resources enough to raise a small, well-trained army in secret. In many ways, superior to 10,000 regular troops. They probably would not have been able to do that if they'd fought on. For one thing, its likely thousands of those patriots would have been doing the fighting and been killed of captured.

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Response to MrScorpio (Original post)

Sat Jul 7, 2018, 11:09 AM

29. IMHO, one of the most brilliant scenes ever filmed

Every single time I see it, I am moved from tears to laughter.

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Response to MrScorpio (Original post)

Sat Jul 7, 2018, 11:21 AM

32. Great post. nt

 

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Response to MrScorpio (Original post)

Sat Jul 7, 2018, 11:22 AM

33. Excellent. Thank you for this

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Response to MrScorpio (Original post)

Sat Jul 7, 2018, 11:23 AM

34. Simply must add this

 

One of my favorite songs from the late great Leonard Cohen


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Response to MrScorpio (Original post)

Sat Jul 7, 2018, 11:24 AM

35. Many film reviewers have long considered "Casablanca" one

of the best films ever made.

"Best" is, of course, a matter of opinion/taste. But "Casablanca" tops my list.

Some of the best known movie lines ever are from "Casablanca."

"I'm shocked. There's gambling going on here." (Pockets money croupier gives him.)

"Play it again, Sam." (Not verbatim, but it's the way most remember it.)

"Of all the gin joints, in all the towns, in all the world, she walks into mine."

"Here's looking at you, kid."

(German officer) "What is your nationality?" (Bogart) "I'm a drunkard."

(Different German) "What will you do when we march into London? (Bogart) "Ask me when you get there."

(Song sung by Dooley Wilson) "As Time Goes By."

(Bogart's girlfriend) Will I see you tonight? (Bogart) I never plan that far ahead."

"Louie, I think this is the beginning of a beautiful friendship."

There are dozens of other clever lines in this outstanding film. I know it's in black and white. I know it's old. I know that there are no superheroes with capes. But do yourself a favor and watch it. It's a magnificent piece of American film making. And it's not dated. With a few exceptions, it could have been made today.




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Response to MrScorpio (Original post)

Sat Jul 7, 2018, 11:41 AM

36. Great post about the greatest movie ever and one of the greatest scenes ever

I appreciate you sharing this because many don't know the history behind what is to me the greatest movie ever. That scene makes me cry because it is so real. The play it is based on was written before America joined the war but the filmmakers made it so timely - even though it came just after we joined the fight.

We should never forget what Paul Henreid's character says said: "This time I know our side will win."

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Response to MrScorpio (Original post)

Sat Jul 7, 2018, 11:53 AM

37. Thanks for this thread

I think, for me, the term "collaborators" sums up a lot. That's a good one...has a flavor of the withering disrespect and disgust that needs to be shown.

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Response to MrScorpio (Original post)

Sat Jul 7, 2018, 11:57 AM

38. Thank you so much for sharing !! nt.

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Response to MrScorpio (Original post)

Sat Jul 7, 2018, 12:07 PM

39. Thank you MrScorpio

for the post and the wonderful background.

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Response to MrScorpio (Original post)

Sat Jul 7, 2018, 12:24 PM

40. Terrific post on a wonderful, classic movie in many aspects. Thanks!

I knew the background of actors Conrad Veidt, Paul Henreid and Peter Lorre, but not some of the others.

And the Lines!

What is you nationality? I'm a drunkard.

What brought you to Casablanca? My health, I came for the waters..What waters, we're in the desert? I was misinformed.

[Can you imagine us in] How about NY? Well, there are certain sections of NY, major that I wouldn't advise you to invade.

Another blundering American. We musn't underestimate American blundering. I was with them when they blundered into Berlin in 1918.

Round up the usual suspects.

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Response to appalachiablue (Reply #40)

Sat Jul 7, 2018, 11:10 PM

50. Also

"We'll always have Paris."

"Maybe not today, maybe not tomorrow, but some day, and for the rest of your life."

Etc., etc., etc.

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Response to kag (Reply #50)

Sat Jul 7, 2018, 11:13 PM

51. Oh yes, that wonderful, lasting sentiment. Love it, and Paris!



The Nazi occupation was horrible, but thankfully Der Fuhrer admired the City of Lights and didn't totally destroy it.

"Hitler's Triumphant Tour of Paris, 1940".."Hitler would gush about Paris for months afterward. He was so impressed, he ordered architect and friend Albert Speer to revive plans for a massive construction program of new public buildings in Berlin, an attempt to destroy Paris, not with bombs, but with superior architecture. “Wasn’t Paris beautiful?” Hitler asked Speer. “But Berlin must be far more beautiful. When we are finished in Berlin, Paris will only be a shadow”. https://rarehistoricalphotos.com/hitler-in-paris-1940/




Hitler and Albert Speer, the Rat touring conquered Paris, June 23, 1940.

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Response to MrScorpio (Original post)

Sat Jul 7, 2018, 04:26 PM

41. Don't forget Bogarts nod to the band leader.

That is a key moment. He is rejoining the cause then.

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Response to MrScorpio (Original post)

Sat Jul 7, 2018, 05:37 PM

42. This is one of my favorite film scenes of all time. One of my favorite films of all time.

Thank you for the background on this! It just makes the scene all the more poignant. Especially the part about Madeleine Lebeau.

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Response to MrScorpio (Original post)

Sat Jul 7, 2018, 08:00 PM

43. Inspiring, MrScorpio, inspiring indeed

and such a backstory that was unknown to me at least.

Many Jewish refugees who survived or escaped Nazi Germany went on to play famous roles in film and Hollywood, often in roles that vilified Nazis, as one would expect. I'm thinking of "Where Eagles Dare" - a couple of the German actors who played Nazi officers in the film, Anton Diffring and Ferdy Mayne fled pre-war Germany, and Ingrid Pitt, a concentration camp survivor.

And of course Hogan's Heroes. Werner Klemperer's father was a famous conductor who fled Hitler's Germany in 1935. Robert Clary was a survivor of Buchenwald. John Banner, Leon Askin (Gen Burkhalter) - both fled Nazi Europe.

As a side note, if you can believe it, John Banner studied law at the University of Vienna, but became an actor instead.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_Banner

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Response to bucolic_frolic (Reply #43)

Sat Jul 7, 2018, 11:37 PM

53. US Army recruiting poster - Sgt Schultz

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Response to keithbvadu2 (Reply #53)

Sun Jul 8, 2018, 06:42 AM

54. Hey that's a piece of trivia!

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Response to MrScorpio (Original post)

Sat Jul 7, 2018, 08:11 PM

44. France has always had the best national anthem. And this is the best rendition. n/t

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Response to MrScorpio (Original post)

Sat Jul 7, 2018, 08:13 PM

45. Truly a wonderful scene

but this one scares the hell out of me


especially today

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Response to MrScorpio (Original post)

Sat Jul 7, 2018, 08:55 PM

46. When Macron won I googled this scene and played it over and

over on #11 Vive la Resistance!

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Response to MrScorpio (Original post)

Sat Jul 7, 2018, 10:46 PM

47. Thank you, Mr. Scorpio.

I had the good fortune of attending the American Film Institute screenwriting program in the 80's with the nephew of one of the screenwriters of "Casablanca". He had some fun stories about his uncle (most of which I no longer remember), and was a decent writer himself.

This has always been one of my favorite movies, and it seems to only improve with age. I was excited to see your post about this iconic scene, but reading your insights about it were an unexpected treat.

I'm curious why you refer to the transit papers as "illegal". If I remember correctly, the papers themselves were completely legitimate and also transferable. That's what made them so valuable. The only thing illegal about them was that they had been stolen, and if I remember correctly the previous holders had been murdered for them some time before Ugarte got his hands on them, leading us to believe that Ugarte himself may have killed for them. Anyway, just curious, wondering if I was missing something.

Finally, once, after watching this movie for the umpteenth time, I looked up Le Marseilles in Wikipedia and read the backstory and the translation of the lyrics. BRUTAL, indeed. And I thought the Star-Spangled Banner was bad! (It is.)

Anyway, thanks again for the post.

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Response to MrScorpio (Original post)

Sat Jul 7, 2018, 10:58 PM

48. To Have and Have Not...

Sometimes thought of as the sequel, is my favorite film. However, I do not view it as a sequel as it was meant to be a vehicle for Bogart and Bacall rather than the ensemble piece Casablanca was. But it definitely hit up on the same theme of picking sides.

This is one of my favorite scenes. It truly is probably the finest example of cinema, period. Perfect in many respects.

What was only hinted at, but not said, the extras were not the usual Hollywood call, but were mostly French refugees which the Director had brought in. He brought them in because La Marsellaise is truly French at its core and needed the honesty, the passion, which being French brought in.

http://seveninchesofyourtime.com/cinemas-greatest-scene-casablanca-and-la-marseillaise/





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Response to MrScorpio (Original post)

Sat Jul 7, 2018, 11:06 PM

49. A film about current events

I never knew that about this film. Humphrey Bogart, Peter Lorre, and all of the other stars in this film yes...but not the current events part. Both of my parents have their own experiences with the Nazis when they grew up in Europe before coming to North America. Everyday during the occupation their was the ever present loss of life. That a madman was coming to get you. Only by determination were you able to make it out alive. In this film I see the same kind of determination, the fighting chance that these people needed to stay alive.


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Response to apkhgp (Reply #49)

Sat Jul 7, 2018, 11:18 PM

52. Yes.

The subplot about the young Bulgarian girl who is so desperate to get herself and her husband to America that she considers allowing herself to be raped in order to get the money they need--it is visceral and compelling.

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Response to MrScorpio (Original post)

Sun Jul 8, 2018, 06:48 AM

56. Back when DVDs were something of a novelty, I was given a DVD of Casablanca.

A woman I worked with asked me to help her shift some furniture at her house (yes, furniture, that's all). I said I'd be glad to help. She offered to pay me but I declined. During a tea-break, we talked about various things and the subject of favourite movies came up. I said my favourite movie was Casablanca. A few days later, I found an envelope in my letterbox. With a copy of Casablanca in it.

That was an excellent form of payment.

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Response to MrScorpio (Original post)

Sun Jul 8, 2018, 07:42 AM

57. Wow! Thanks Scorpio...

Never knew any of that. Now I know why that movie was one of my parents favorites.

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Response to MrScorpio (Original post)

Sun Jul 8, 2018, 08:46 AM

58. One of the greatest movies of all time

Every time I watch it I see something new. Thanks for giving me a perspective from which I can watch it again!

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Response to MrScorpio (Original post)

Sun Jul 8, 2018, 07:12 PM

59. It has always been my favorite and now even more so, thx

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