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Ted Turner agrees with us about media rules

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mandyky Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sat Jul-24-04 05:25 AM
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Ted Turner agrees with us about media rules
I'd been wondering why we hadn't heard from Mr. Turner and wha la today I saw a post on an article he'd written over at Change for America blog.

<snip>
So when the FCC received a glut of applications for new television stations after World War II, the agency set aside dozens of channels on the new UHF spectrum so independents could get a foothold in television. That helped me get my start 35 years ago. Congress also passed a law in 1962 requiring that TVs be equipped to receive both UHF and VHF channels. That's how I was able to compete as a UHF station, although it was never easy. (I used to tell potential advertisers that our UHF viewers were smarter than the rest, because you had to be a genius just to figure out how to tune us in.) And in 1972, the FCC ruled that cable TV operators could import distant signals. That's how we were able to beam our Atlanta station to homes throughout the South. Five years later, with the help of an RCA satellite, we were sending our signal across the nation, and the Superstation was born.

That was then.

Today, media companies are more concentrated than at any time over the past 40 years, thanks to a continual loosening of ownership rules by Washington. The media giants now own not only broadcast networks and local stations; they also own the cable companies that pipe in the signals of their competitors and the studios that produce most of the programming. To get a flavor of how consolidated the industry has become, consider this: In 1990, the major broadcast networks--ABC, CBS, NBC, and Fox--fully or partially owned just 12.5 percent of the new series they aired. By 2000, it was 56.3 percent. Just two years later, it had surged to 77.5 percent.


</snip>

Read more at -

http://www.washingtonmonthly.com/features/2004/0407.tur...
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DaveSZ Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sat Jul-24-04 05:51 AM
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1. TT is one of the good guys
It's too bad he doesn't own CNN anymore, because they've really gone downhill.
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