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MrScorpio

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Member since: 2002
Number of posts: 65,996

Journal Archives

This is an example of someone who pays attention to what's going on...

Get in, let's go, there's no time to explain!

Art Lives...













I don't expect that you can get it your way there...

That's because they're fascists...

Clinton and Trump Get Most of Their Campaign Funds from These 250 Neighborhoods



AUTHOR: JOANNA PEARLSTEIN

DURING MONDAY NIGHT’S presidential candidate debate, Republican nominee Donald Trump lamented his opponent’s advertising spending. “I also noticed the very nasty commercials that you do on me in so many different ways,” he said to Democratic nominee Hillary Clinton, “which I don’t do on you. Maybe I’m trying to save the money.” Maybe so. Clinton is, in fact, outspending Trump on advertising. Partially that’s because she has raised a lot more money.

At the end of August, according to the Federal Election Commission, the Trump campaign had raised $75 million, while Clinton’s had taken in $289.3 million.

Where does the Clinton campaign’s money come from? Silicon Valley, for sure. But put Clinton’s donors on a map and you see a broader picture.

The FEC, which compels political candidates to file regular reports on their fundraising and expenditures, provides data on funding by zip code in addition to tracking donations by employer and state. For the month of August, the 10 zip codes sending the most funding to Clinton are all on the east coast: eight in New York City, one in Washington DC, and one in Cambridge, Massachusetts. Last month we reported that Clinton took in lots of cash from the west side of Manhattan, and this month the trend continues: Clinton drew $364,000 from four West Side neighborhoods in August. Republican nominee Donald Trump, by contrast, raised that amount from his top 32 zip codes.

https://www.wired.com/2016/09/clinton-trump-get-campaign-funds-250-neighborhoods/?mbid=social_twitter


Clinton donations come from Metropolitan areas, which are more socially and racially diverse and with more educated individuals and Trump's donations are spread all over the mostly white boonies...

I'm not surprised at all.

Look who found a Pokemon!







Capt. Jack Harkness gotz skillz.

And some people wonder why black people are wary of the police...





















He's the victim of a crime and the police immediate treated him like a criminal... AS IF we're ALL criminals in their eyes. That's how they see us.

Why white people can’t see there is ‘White Reality’ and ‘Everyone Else’s Reality’

By Jamie Varon

When I turned 16 and started driving, I was afraid of speeding tickets. I hated the police in an abstract way because I hated having to follow the law of the road. I wanted my rebellion and my 80 mph on the freeway.

Since getting my license, I’ve been let go with a warning more times than I’ve been issued a ticket. For someone who spent her twenties consistently speeding, driving recklessly, and generally not caring much about whether I was breaking the law or not, I’ve been pulled over a negligible number of times. And on the off-chance I saw police car lights flashing in my rearview mirror, I never feared for my life. Not once. I was never scared of the police—I was just concerned about the repercussions of a traffic ticket.

So, when I started to see video proof of police brutality towards people of color—particularly black people—I was horrified at first, but then I was skeptical. What had they done to incite this behavior? What was missing from this video? How could officers actually treat people like this?

To me, it felt like there were two kinds of police: the ones I saw on video and the ones I met in my life. I realized, then, that part of my white privilege was being able to trust police to have my best interests in mind; to trust that they assumed my innocence; to trust they’d be rational when dealing with me. Once I recognized that my experience with the police wasn’t universal, I started to listen, to recognize my privilege, and to believe people of color. I wish I’d realized this earlier, but that’s the insidiousness of privilege: It’s so entrenched that you don’t even realize it’s an advantage.

Systemic racism, police brutality, the very real disadvantages that people of color face—all of this can be hard to make sense of, especially if your experience with authorities has been vastly different. As someone who’s been championing social justice causes for more than a decade, I thought to myself: If I was this ignorant, this blinded by my own experiences, other white people must be, too—probably even more so.

http://fusion.net/story/352140/white-people-reality-people-of-color-reality/

Why is this even controversial?

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