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Wed Jan 16, 2013, 03:35 PM

The Globular Star Cluster 47 Tucanae

The Globular Star Cluster 47 Tucanae



This bright cluster of stars is 47 Tucanae (NGC 104), shown here in an image taken by ESO’s VISTA (Visible and Infrared Survey Telescope for Astronomy) from the Paranal Observatory in Chile. This cluster is located around 15 000 light-years away from us and contains millions of stars, some of which are unusual and exotic. This image was taken as part of the VISTA Magellanic Cloud survey, a project that is scanning the region of the Magellanic Clouds, two small galaxies that are very close to our Milky Way.

Credit: ESO/M.-R. Cioni/VISTA Magellanic Cloud survey. Acknowledgment: Cambridge Astronomical Survey Unit

http://www.space.com/19284-the-globular-star-cluster-47-tucanae.html

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Reply The Globular Star Cluster 47 Tucanae (Original post)
Judi Lynn Jan 2013 OP
Judi Lynn Jan 2013 #1
longship Jan 2013 #2
byronius Jan 2013 #3

Response to Judi Lynn (Original post)

Wed Jan 16, 2013, 03:42 PM

1. Jumble of Exotic Stars

Jumble of Exotic Stars
by Staff Writers
Munich, Germany (SPX) Jan 16, 2013

This new infrared image from ESO's VISTA telescope shows the globular cluster 47 Tucanae in striking detail. This cluster contains millions of stars, and there are many nestled at its core that are exotic and display unusual properties. Studying objects within clusters like 47 Tucanae may help us to understand how these oddballs form and interact. This image is very sharp and deep due to the size, sensitivity, and location of VISTA, which is sited at ESO's Paranal Observatory in Chile.

Globular clusters are vast, spherical clouds of old stars bound together by gravity. They are found circling the cores of galaxies, as satellites orbit the Earth.

These star clumps contain very little dust and gas - it is thought that most of it has been either blown from the cluster by winds and explosions from the stars within, or stripped away by interstellar gas interacting with the cluster. Any remaining material coalesced to form stars billions of years ago.

These globular clusters spark a considerable amount of interest for astronomers - 47 Tucanae, otherwise known as NGC 104, is a huge, ancient globular cluster about 15 000 light-years away from us, and is known to contain many bizarre and interesting stars and systems.

More:
http://www.spacedaily.com/reports/A_Jumble_of_Exotic_Stars_999.html

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Response to Judi Lynn (Original post)

Wed Jan 16, 2013, 03:46 PM

2. Too bad the Southern Hemisphere has much of the good Astro stuff.

47 Tucanae is a beauty, rivaled only by Omega Centauri, also in the southern skies.

Northerners have to settle for the Hercules cluster, which is fairly spectacular in its own right.

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Response to Judi Lynn (Original post)

Wed Jan 16, 2013, 05:09 PM

3. Thanks for this. Lovely.

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