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Mon Dec 12, 2011, 04:57 PM

Meditation, anyone?

Who here meditates? Any stories about how meditation has changed you?

I try to meditate every morning and, for me, it is the core of my spiritual practice. It gives me a much deeper awareness of myself and others. It's funny how you can see so much more when you quiet the chatter in your head.

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Arrow 16 replies Author Time Post
Reply Meditation, anyone? (Original post)
tinrobot Dec 2011 OP
Sarah Ibarruri Dec 2011 #1
freshwest Dec 2011 #2
Taverner Dec 2011 #3
KRansome83 Mar 2013 #16
WheelWalker Dec 2011 #4
Dover Dec 2011 #5
GliderGuider Dec 2011 #6
Viva_Daddy Dec 2011 #7
onestepforward Dec 2011 #8
grr8wine Oct 2012 #12
GliderGuider Dec 2011 #9
Melissa G Dec 2011 #10
mmkkpro Oct 2012 #11
sanatanadharma Oct 2012 #13
sandyshoes17 Jan 2013 #14
TM99 Jan 2013 #15

Response to tinrobot (Original post)

Mon Dec 12, 2011, 05:03 PM

1. I try to meditate. I can't meditate for long, as I'm busy and I'm no expert meditator. However...

meditation helps me get a handle on stress. I've gone for long periods without meditation. However, during the weeks and months when I meditate, I'm less emotional, less nervous about things that might ordinarily make me nervous, more able to have perspective, and I have less anticipatory stress ("what will happen if.."

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Response to tinrobot (Original post)

Mon Dec 12, 2011, 05:08 PM

2. Try to do more non-verbal prompts. Don't do well with guided ones.

I have to have quiet time by myself every day or things don't work well for me.

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Response to tinrobot (Original post)

Mon Dec 12, 2011, 05:14 PM

3. Despite my ADHD, I can meditate

 

Really helps sometimes too

Other times, not so much

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Response to Taverner (Reply #3)

Thu Mar 14, 2013, 11:17 PM

16. I can relate...

...as I meditate on a daily basis and quite often through the day. There's times I can really focus and get down to business and other times where the effort is futile.

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Response to tinrobot (Original post)

Mon Dec 12, 2011, 05:33 PM

4. Zazen

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Response to tinrobot (Original post)

Tue Dec 13, 2011, 05:11 PM

5. Yes I have a pretty regular meditation practice and the experience varies.

Sometimes it's just an opportunity to quiet and center myself to open up the receptive feminine heart energy.
And other times I feel very much in direct and open communion with the Divine. I'm always longing for those
times of deepest connection. There are no words for that expeience, only a feeling...

,

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Response to tinrobot (Original post)

Wed Dec 14, 2011, 11:54 AM

6. I've used a broad range of meditation techniques.

I usually use do a form of vipassana, incorporating various still-mind self-inquiry techniques. The main forms of inquiry I like are Ramana Maharshi's question "Who am I?" and the teachings of A.H. Almaas regarding Personal Essence. These have brought me into direct contact with something that looks suspiciously like my own soul.

Sometimes I just do deep relaxation. That can sometimes drop me straight into the Void, with the reminder that all is One and Nothing at the same non-time.

I've done some of Osho's active meditations. They always leave me with with a combination of exhaustion and endorphins that open the door to absolute stillness afterwards.

Two of my favourite experiences have been long-term sensory deprivation meditations, lying down in a quiet dark room wearing a blindfold and earplugs. One was for 28 hours, the other for three days. I really got to watch my mind at play. During the first, shorter one I uncovered my disowned spirituality and developed my personal sacred cosmology.

So, yeah, meditation has changed me a lot...

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Response to tinrobot (Original post)

Wed Dec 14, 2011, 03:00 PM

7. For me, meditation is simply (but not easily) to keep bringing the attention back to

what I call "now/here". Every time one catches ones attention being diverted to thoughts, just keep bringing your attention back to what is now/here. Don't try to suppress thoughts, just become aware of the monkey mind and, in time, it will quiet down.

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Response to Viva_Daddy (Reply #7)

Wed Dec 14, 2011, 11:59 PM

8. Likewise for me.

I try to meditate while performing daily stuff, like washing dishes. It helps me to stay in the present moment and slows my mind from spinning.

Another type of meditation that I enjoying doing is being outside with nature. I start by paying attention to my breathing, then shift my thought to my surroundings. I pay attention to sounds, sights and smells... without labeling or judging them. For example, when I hear a dog bark, I try not to think "dog," but simply listen to the sound itself.

Meditation can be a challenge at times and I know I need to do it more often, but it has helped me become calmer and balanced. My life is richer for it.

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Response to onestepforward (Reply #8)

Sun Oct 28, 2012, 04:32 PM

12. I do the same

meditate while doing dishes, painting my new town house, etc... Meditation is a practice, a prayer, no right or wrong way of doing it, but it is a challenge to quiet the mind. Deep breathing is a basic path I use to stop the chatter.

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Response to tinrobot (Original post)

Fri Dec 16, 2011, 12:41 AM

9. I got this message tonight from a teacher I respect. I like his simplicity and straightforwardness.

You know that life has ups and downs. But, do you know how to escape the "downs"? Do you know how to find a bullet proof refuge where no problem can reach you? A glass of wine? Occasionally maybe, but as a way to cope it will eventually enslave you.

It is not difficult to escape the "downs" in a healthy, fast way. You simply take a deep breath and move the attention from mind to Consciousness, and just rest as Consciousness.

What will you find in there? Nothing special. In pure Consciousness there are no things; however, happiness and peace are natural, intrinsic qualities of Consciousness. Rest as Consciousness for even a few seconds and when you come out of it you feel different, you feel better -- the gloom is gone.

In his book "I am That" Nisargadatta says that "it is like a skill." And perhaps it is! And this is good because it means that we can learn the skill -- the skill of letting go of the thoughts and rest as Consciousness. But "let go of the thoughts" does not mean "quiet the thoughts." It is more like "forget" the thoughts, "ignore" the thoughts.

You forget the thoughts and transfer the attention to Consciousness. A deep breath helps -- and just one is enough!


Courtesy of Gian Paolo Girardi, http://www.brainoptimization.com/

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Response to tinrobot (Original post)

Mon Dec 19, 2011, 11:27 AM

10. Daily.

of the "Don't leave home without it and take it with you when you go" school.

Mostly Kundalini Yoga, but it depends what I am reading at the time. I've wandered a lot of places spiritually in my 50 plus years.

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Response to tinrobot (Original post)

Sat Oct 13, 2012, 12:14 PM

11. meditation

My first introduction to meditation was back in early 90s,since then i have become more involved,i have been reading the nag hammadi the gnostic texts found in 1945,and i gotta say they are amazing,the wealth of ancient knowledge is incredible,as i have been reading them i see things much differently,they spoke of meditation also,but the meditation is good for every aspect of a persons life i plan to continue for i have a lot of learning to do,i find as i have aged things arnt as they were presented when i was young.

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Response to tinrobot (Original post)

Mon Oct 29, 2012, 05:10 PM

13. meditation is...

...an appointment with one's 'Self'

one enters the (so to speak) innermost sanctum having shed stored shelves of self's stuff

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Response to tinrobot (Original post)

Fri Jan 4, 2013, 06:59 PM

14. I find it to be essential

Like food and exercise. I meditated every morning for almost 3 yrs. I don't know if it had anything to do with it, but, my life changed. My past came to the present, and my present moved forward, it was great for a boring person. Ha. I started doing the treadmill every morning and between that and the past that hit me in the head, I found it hard to get back into that routine. I have found other ways, not as focused, but it seems to work. I try to incorporate meditation into my everyday functions. I think the ultimate is living meditation, to be aware and within at the same time. You have given me incentive to start it up again, I've been thinking about it alot. thanks.

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Response to tinrobot (Original post)

Mon Jan 28, 2013, 11:40 AM

15. I also find meditation to be an essential daily practice.

I was very fortunate to have a father who meditated. He was taught Transcendental Meditation in the 1960's by the Maharishi Mahesh Yogi. He is 80 this year, and he still does it daily. When I was 9, I was taught TM. In college, during youthful explorations of religious paths, I discovered the Theravadic Buddhist Schools. I never became a Buddhist, however, I did receive much training in Satipatthana meditation including Vipassana, Anapanasati, and Samatha and traditional Japanese Zazen in my 20's and 30's.

I meditate at least twice a day (upon awakening and before retiring), and I have done so now for decades. It is as much a part of my daily life as eating breakfast or brushing my teeth. I never allow for excuses for why I can not meditate. Not when I was in the service (though I often had to shorten my sessions) or when I was on chemo (I often couldn't make it through a long session). I recommend it in some shape, form or fashion to all of my psychotherapy clients whether young or old. It does not have to be religious or spiritual yet it can be if one so desires. I honestly don't know of a single religion or philosophy in history that does not have a contemplative/meditative component as a valid part of its tradition.

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