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Fri Apr 6, 2012, 05:01 PM

Welcome to the Friday Afternoon Challenge: The Art of Good Friday!

Here are six works interpreting of the events of Good Friday. Can you identify these famous works and their artists?

...and please, folks, don’t cheat...
1.

2.

3.

4.

5.

6.

29 replies, 2566 views

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Arrow 29 replies Author Time Post
Reply Welcome to the Friday Afternoon Challenge: The Art of Good Friday! (Original post)
CTyankee Apr 2012 OP
immoderate Apr 2012 #1
CTyankee Apr 2012 #2
The Velveteen Ocelot Apr 2012 #3
CTyankee Apr 2012 #4
The Velveteen Ocelot Apr 2012 #5
CTyankee Apr 2012 #6
grantcart Apr 2012 #27
Poll_Blind Apr 2012 #7
CTyankee Apr 2012 #8
pinboy3niner Apr 2012 #9
CTyankee Apr 2012 #11
pinboy3niner Apr 2012 #14
IcyPeas Apr 2012 #10
CTyankee Apr 2012 #12
The Velveteen Ocelot Apr 2012 #13
CTyankee Apr 2012 #15
The Velveteen Ocelot Apr 2012 #17
CTyankee Apr 2012 #23
librechik Apr 2012 #16
CTyankee Apr 2012 #19
pinboy3niner Apr 2012 #18
CTyankee Apr 2012 #20
IcyPeas Apr 2012 #21
CTyankee Apr 2012 #22
suffragette Apr 2012 #24
CTyankee Apr 2012 #28
suffragette Apr 2012 #29
ellisonz Apr 2012 #25
CTyankee Apr 2012 #26

Response to CTyankee (Original post)

Fri Apr 6, 2012, 05:05 PM

1. It has something to do with Jesus, right?




--imm

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Response to immoderate (Reply #1)

Fri Apr 6, 2012, 05:10 PM

2. could be...

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Response to CTyankee (Original post)

Fri Apr 6, 2012, 05:12 PM

3. #2 looks like Breughel.

and #4 is clearly Dürer. It's even got his logo in the upper-left corner.

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Response to The Velveteen Ocelot (Reply #3)

Fri Apr 6, 2012, 05:15 PM

4. #2 is not Bruegel. You are correct about Durer. I saw that sign but didn't know it was

just his logo. I assumed it stood for Dominus. That's what I get for "overthinking" this work!

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Response to CTyankee (Reply #4)

Fri Apr 6, 2012, 05:20 PM

5. Most of Dürer's engravings have this monogram:



(A.D. for Albrecht Dürer).

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Response to The Velveteen Ocelot (Reply #5)

Fri Apr 6, 2012, 05:22 PM

6. good for him! Not many artists of his time did this (or any, that I know of).

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Response to The Velveteen Ocelot (Reply #3)

Sat Apr 7, 2012, 12:19 PM

27. Really. Marvelous. Which DUer painted it? Quite good actually.

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Response to CTyankee (Original post)

Fri Apr 6, 2012, 05:24 PM

7. Don't know who did #3, but that's an incredible painting. nt

PB

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Response to Poll_Blind (Reply #7)

Fri Apr 6, 2012, 05:25 PM

8. It is! I have alot of respect for this artist as a human being in his time...

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Response to CTyankee (Original post)

Fri Apr 6, 2012, 05:27 PM

9. #6: Tintoretto, Christ Carrying the Cross nt

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Response to pinboy3niner (Reply #9)

Fri Apr 6, 2012, 05:45 PM

11. hey, pinboy! You are right!

Are you a fan of Tintoretto?

I must say that I am not a fan very often...when he gets all Mannerist on me...but I do like this one. It is interesting in its angled view of the ascension to Calvary.

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Response to CTyankee (Reply #11)

Fri Apr 6, 2012, 05:56 PM

14. I got lucky

I was actually searching for #1, lol!

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Response to CTyankee (Original post)

Fri Apr 6, 2012, 05:29 PM

10. numbers 3 and 5?

3. reminds me of a William Blake

5. reminds me of either Rembrandt or Caravaggio

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Response to IcyPeas (Reply #10)

Fri Apr 6, 2012, 05:48 PM

12. No, sorry. Not any of those. I didn't know Blake did this kind of work but then I don't know

Blake all that well.

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Response to CTyankee (Reply #12)

Fri Apr 6, 2012, 05:54 PM

13. Blake's stuff is amazing.

Hard to believe it dates from about 1780-1820. He was way ahead of his time - like by at least 100 years.



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Response to The Velveteen Ocelot (Reply #13)

Fri Apr 6, 2012, 05:58 PM

15. Was he on laudenum? So many people were in the early part of the 19th century.

Robert Browning gave Elizabeth the "Chianti cure" in Florence, to help her get over hers.

Hell, if I lived in an apartment in the oltrarno of Florence, on the edge of the Palazzo Pitti, I'd drink Chianti with delight as I sat on my balcony and enjoyed the view!

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Response to CTyankee (Reply #15)

Fri Apr 6, 2012, 06:02 PM

17. Some of his contemporaries thought he was mad.

And maybe he was, but in a really fascinating way.

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Response to The Velveteen Ocelot (Reply #13)

Fri Apr 6, 2012, 07:56 PM

23. Actually, so much of what went before is used for those creating that which is to come...

you see it in art all the time...

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Response to CTyankee (Original post)

Fri Apr 6, 2012, 06:01 PM

16. 5 is Goya, no?

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Response to librechik (Reply #16)

Fri Apr 6, 2012, 07:32 PM

19. Yes! You are a Goya fan? I am too!

I love this work...

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Response to CTyankee (Original post)

Fri Apr 6, 2012, 07:03 PM

18. Kick

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Response to CTyankee (Original post)

Fri Apr 6, 2012, 07:36 PM

20. #s 4, 5 and 6 are identified, but not #s 1,2,and 3.

Hmmm.

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Response to CTyankee (Original post)

Fri Apr 6, 2012, 07:44 PM

21. is No.2 depicting the stations of the cross?

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Response to IcyPeas (Reply #21)

Fri Apr 6, 2012, 07:46 PM

22. You know, I think it may be. There is definitely a time continuum going on.

I love this painting and this artist for the precision of detail going on with the people, the architectural detail (telling us how people actually lived in those days) and the story lines.

But I am not sure it directly follows the stations of the cross...

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Response to CTyankee (Reply #22)

Sat Apr 7, 2012, 02:47 AM

24. Found it by searching for Passion of Christ

so stations of the cross is in the zone.

Interesting.
The style seemed familiar, but I don't recall seeing the artist's name before.
Then again, I am bad with names - lol.

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Response to suffragette (Reply #24)

Sat Apr 7, 2012, 12:49 PM

28. I am generally weak in Northern European art of that era...I am much better informed

about the Italian Renaissance. But I have found Memling to be a very interesting artist. I love how he does his large panoramic scenes. It fascinates me to see how he presents daily life and integrates the Biblical stories therein. It's an historical glimpse into the lives of people of his time.

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Response to CTyankee (Reply #28)

Sat Apr 7, 2012, 01:18 PM

29. Good point

Also was interesting in terms of his patrons and his inclusion of them. The woman on the right jumped out a bit, being perhaps slightly larger than the other figures and i saw in the wiki that was a portrait of the patron's wife.


Poking around a bit, I found these more detailed ones at the Met:
http://www.metmuseum.org/Collections/search-the-collections/110001503

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Response to CTyankee (Original post)

Sat Apr 7, 2012, 03:37 AM

25. I got nothing. n/t

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Response to CTyankee (Original post)

Sat Apr 7, 2012, 12:18 PM

26. Answers are here (edited with correct link) sorry about that.

http://sync.democraticunderground.com/1002529367

Hope you enjoyed the art. See you next week!

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