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Tue Mar 26, 2013, 11:23 AM

The Obama administration is aggressively growing private prisons,

and the use of prison slave labor by corporations is skyrocketing.

Obama's 2013 budget: One area of marked growth, the prison industrial complex
http://sync.democraticunderground.com/1002392306

Obama selects the owner of a private prison consulting firm as the new Director of the United States Marshals Service (USMS)
http://www.wsws.org/en/articles/2010/12/mars-d03.html

Private prison corporations move up on list on federal contractors, receiving BILLIONS
http://www.nationofchange.org/president-obama-s-incarcernation-1335274655

"Since President Obama’s first day in office the Corrections Corporation of America and The GEO Group have been awarded $1.7 and 1.8 billion dollars in federal contracts, respectively. And beginning in October 2011 the Corrections Corporation of America has taken its place as the government’s top contractor whereas the GEO Group comfortably maintains the third-place position. Finally, according to USAspending, over one-quarter of private prison contracts have been established under “non-compete” agreements."

Prison Labor Booms As Unemployment Remains High; Companies Reap Benefits
http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2012/12/10/prison-labor_n_2272036.html


Financial growth of the private prison industry:

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Arrow 62 replies Author Time Post
Reply The Obama administration is aggressively growing private prisons, (Original post)
woo me with science Mar 2013 OP
sabrina 1 Mar 2013 #1
markiv Mar 2013 #5
woo me with science Apr 2013 #61
JEB Mar 2013 #18
CrispyQ Mar 2013 #30
RKP5637 Mar 2013 #52
markiv Mar 2013 #2
dotymed Mar 2013 #17
CrispyQ Mar 2013 #54
woo me with science Mar 2013 #34
arely staircase Mar 2013 #60
bullwinkle428 Mar 2013 #3
Autumn Mar 2013 #4
markiv Mar 2013 #6
Autumn Mar 2013 #7
dotymed Mar 2013 #20
fredamae Mar 2013 #32
MindPilot Mar 2013 #36
fredamae Mar 2013 #46
forestpath Mar 2013 #8
Nuclear Unicorn Mar 2013 #21
OnyxCollie Mar 2013 #28
Go Vols Mar 2013 #43
OnyxCollie Mar 2013 #44
green for victory Mar 2013 #9
markiv Mar 2013 #10
dotymed Mar 2013 #22
woo me with science Mar 2013 #35
Progressive dog Mar 2013 #11
woo me with science Mar 2013 #12
MindPilot Mar 2013 #38
woo me with science Mar 2013 #13
KamaAina Mar 2013 #29
MindPilot Mar 2013 #31
WillyT Mar 2013 #14
valerief Mar 2013 #15
woo me with science Mar 2013 #45
ProSense Mar 2013 #16
Rex Mar 2013 #19
colsohlibgal Mar 2013 #23
woo me with science Mar 2013 #49
AnotherMcIntosh Mar 2013 #24
cynzke Mar 2013 #25
cynzke Mar 2013 #27
AnnieK401 Mar 2013 #26
MindPilot Mar 2013 #33
KoKo Mar 2013 #37
MindPilot Mar 2013 #39
ProSense Mar 2013 #40
MindPilot Mar 2013 #42
FATNED Mar 2013 #41
Initech Mar 2013 #47
Faryn Balyncd Mar 2013 #48
woo me with science Mar 2013 #50
Hotler Mar 2013 #51
woo me with science Mar 2013 #53
woo me with science Mar 2013 #55
bezrodny Mar 2013 #56
woo me with science Mar 2013 #57
bezrodny Mar 2013 #58
woo me with science Mar 2013 #59
jsr Apr 2013 #62

Response to woo me with science (Original post)

Tue Mar 26, 2013, 11:29 AM

1. We have the biggest prison population in the world. There had to be a reason for that

because we all know that our government has little interest in actual crime. See our war and economic criminals eg. It's always about money when a country goes so far off the rails as this one has.

Shameful, predatory capitalism. Using human beings as fodder for the money machine. Is this any different than the old days of slavery when human beings were used for commercial purposes?

No wonder they don't want to legalize MJ.

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Response to sabrina 1 (Reply #1)

Tue Mar 26, 2013, 11:47 AM

5. it is a bit odd that the 'land of the free' has the highest incarceration rate

 

higher than

russia

china

north korea

iran

sadam hussain's iraq

any any other oppressive country you can think of

maybe orwell was right maybe freedom IS slavery

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Response to markiv (Reply #5)

Sun Apr 14, 2013, 12:19 AM

61. +10000

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Response to sabrina 1 (Reply #1)

Tue Mar 26, 2013, 01:01 PM

18. Certainly not

the kind of infrastructure and jobs program I was hoping for. So much greed and human suffering.

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Response to sabrina 1 (Reply #1)

Tue Mar 26, 2013, 02:21 PM

30. It's been some time & I didn't save the link,

but I read that one state offers some prisoners time off their sentence in exchange for their work. And we thought it was bad competing against Asians for $2 a day, now we are competing against Americans working for free in exchange for shorter sentences.

When are Americans going to wake up? When it's too fucking late, that's when.

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Response to CrispyQ (Reply #30)

Wed Mar 27, 2013, 10:14 AM

52. Americans are not going to wake the F up. Many

always think someone else is taking care of things for them. Well, they are, they are turning them into financial slaves, and many are too F'en clueless to comprehend what's going on. And many don't seem to get it that often when it comes to $$$$$ and big money, R=D=I!

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Response to woo me with science (Original post)

Tue Mar 26, 2013, 11:36 AM

2. private prisons create lobbies for longer sentences

 

because longer sentences mean more revenue - so while a private prison may *claim* a lower cost of incarceration per day, you may end up with more days of incarceration to pay for

there are reasons to ask one's representatives for longer sentences, there are reasons to ask for shorter - but the WORST reason to ask for longer, is that the private prison you operate will make more money. and that's exactly what happens. you think a private prison corp ever lobbied for shorter sentences?

there should never be that motive in the decision to take another person's freedom. but that
's exactly what using private prisons does

it is not an exaggeration to call it a 'Prison Industrial Complex'. It has the exact same issues that Eisenhower identified with the military industrial complex - a large industry with massive conflicts of interests toward the society it supposedly serves

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Response to markiv (Reply #2)

Tue Mar 26, 2013, 01:01 PM

17. Sickeningly close to our health insurance complex.

Big corporations making huge profits from the suffering of others. What makes America a "first world country?" Hell, we place last (or close to it) on every indicator of a fair, equitable and humane society.

I have wondered for the last 30 years of my life, "what will it take to make our citizens take to the streets en masse, and reject "our" countries barbaric policies?"
Only (IMO) if the wealth of the elite oligarchs was put in jeopardy, would we see this happening. Of course since there are so few of them, most protesters would be paid.

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Response to dotymed (Reply #17)

Wed Mar 27, 2013, 11:04 AM

54. So many of our major institutions are corrupt & compromised to the core.

"what will it take to make our citizens take to the streets en masse, and reject "our" countries barbaric policies?"

I have no idea what it will take. When I talk about issues like this with family & friends they look at me with that "there she goes again" look. It seems to be a sad truth that most people have to be personally affected before they pay attention. I fear by the time a critical mass of people have been affected, it will be too late for any peaceful change. It may be too late for that already. The 'lesser of two evils' at the voting booth isn't working out too well.

RKP5637 nailed it above, where she stated: when it comes to $$$$$ and big money, R=D=I!

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Response to markiv (Reply #2)

Tue Mar 26, 2013, 02:35 PM

34. +1 There should never be a profit motive

for imprisoning human beings.

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Response to woo me with science (Reply #34)

Sun Mar 31, 2013, 02:41 AM

60. +1 - or denying health care

eom

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Response to woo me with science (Original post)

Tue Mar 26, 2013, 11:39 AM

3. Prison slave labor? I thought we wanted to bring manufacturing back to America!

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Response to bullwinkle428 (Reply #3)

Tue Mar 26, 2013, 11:44 AM

4. Bring manufacturing back to America? That would require paying a wage

I think that the powers that be would rather use cheap labor. It all about profits for them.

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Response to Autumn (Reply #4)

Tue Mar 26, 2013, 11:48 AM

6. want a job? get a sentence, not a degree

 

and the only debt you will have, will be to society

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Response to markiv (Reply #6)

Tue Mar 26, 2013, 11:50 AM

7. Well on the bright side, there is health care in prisons. For now.

Welcome to DU

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Response to markiv (Reply #6)

Tue Mar 26, 2013, 01:04 PM

20. Actually, many prisons and most jails

now charge the incarcerated person big bucks for each day they are locked up....

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Response to dotymed (Reply #20)

Tue Mar 26, 2013, 02:29 PM

32. PLUS They Bill Us for about $3000.00 per

head per Month! So, yea---they're making out Big time for making New Laws. Longer Sentencing etc turning otherwise law abiding citizens into criminals-For Profit-turning our "justice system" into an agency of armed revenue agents?

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Response to fredamae (Reply #32)

Tue Mar 26, 2013, 02:39 PM

36. The figure I've heard is $300 per day per inmate

That is pushing $10,000 per month, or $120,000 per year. Actual cost of housing an average medium security inmate is around $28,000 per year.

If my math is anywhere near accurate, that is a LOT of profit.

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Response to MindPilot (Reply #36)

Tue Mar 26, 2013, 08:32 PM

46. WOW!

Last I could find it varied from state to state somewhere between $2900.00 to $3400. per mo.

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Response to woo me with science (Original post)

Tue Mar 26, 2013, 11:51 AM

8. This is chilling, but what I've come to expect from Obama. There is nothing he won't sell out.

 

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Response to forestpath (Reply #8)

Tue Mar 26, 2013, 01:04 PM

21. Is it even possible to disagree without resorting to nasty insults?

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Response to Nuclear Unicorn (Reply #21)

Tue Mar 26, 2013, 02:16 PM

28. There's nothing nasty about that.

Cheer louder if it upsets you.

O-BA-MA! U-S-A! O-BA-MA! U-S-A!

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Response to OnyxCollie (Reply #28)

Tue Mar 26, 2013, 03:26 PM

43. +1

It wont help tho.

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Response to Go Vols (Reply #43)

Tue Mar 26, 2013, 04:08 PM

44. Yup.

Last edited Tue Mar 26, 2013, 05:00 PM - Edit history (1)

Official and unofficial propaganda continuously
drums home the message that the friends and allies of the nation
are virtuous and the enemies evil. The average man in the street
has a firm belief that the governments (and possibly the people as well)
of certain nations are his friends in a very personal sense while others
are his enemies.
He is willing to pay high taxes, obey regulations that
may be detrimental to his private interests, and even go to war and kill
people in support of his nation's foreign polley. He would he shocked
and horrified if his government suddenly asked him to alter all his
opinions and fight on the side of the nations he dislikes against the nations
he likes. Sudden changes are therefore made particularly difficult
by the role of modern public opinion.


Organski, A. F. K. (1958). World politics (p. 353). New York: Knopf.

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Response to woo me with science (Original post)

Tue Mar 26, 2013, 12:01 PM

9. k/r for sad truth

 

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Response to woo me with science (Original post)

Tue Mar 26, 2013, 12:02 PM

10. It's no coincidence that the 80s 'War on Drugs' hysteria occured during the birth of the private

 

prison industry

I'm not 'pro-drugs', but long sentences for prison profits is not the answer

all the propoganda jacking up the public's emotions to DEMAND AN ANSWER!! (and we have one for you, that makes us a tidy profit)

it's where i began to really question the motives of much of our press

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Response to markiv (Reply #10)

Tue Mar 26, 2013, 01:08 PM

22. What about the fact that "our" armed forces

are ordered to protect the opium (heroin) fields in Afghanistan?

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Response to markiv (Reply #10)

Tue Mar 26, 2013, 02:37 PM

35. The marijuana war, and also the growing surveillance state

will help keep the shareholders of these prisons happy.

When a government creates for itself the ability to constantly monitor and comb through everything people say or do, it is not hard to make sure that lots of people end up in prison.

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Response to woo me with science (Original post)

Tue Mar 26, 2013, 12:17 PM

11. What about Locheed, Boeing, Northrup, Raytheon etc.

I don't like the idea of private prisons, but I don't believe that either of those prison corps is anywhere near the government's top contractor.

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Response to Progressive dog (Reply #11)

Tue Mar 26, 2013, 12:27 PM

12. You are right, of course.

Edited for clarity.

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Response to Progressive dog (Reply #11)

Tue Mar 26, 2013, 02:47 PM

38. Yeah, execpt that those big DoD contrators

are not directly subverting the justice sytem for profit.

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Response to woo me with science (Original post)

Tue Mar 26, 2013, 12:36 PM

13. Government guarantees 90% occupancy rate in private prisons.

http://usatoday30.usatoday.com/news/nation/story/2012-03-01/buying-prisons-require-high-occupancy/53402894/1

Private purchasing of prisons locks in occupancy rates

WASHINGTON – At a time when states are struggling to reduce bloated prison populations and tight budgets, a private prison management company is offering to buy prisons in exchange for various considerations, including a controversial guarantee that the governments maintain a 90% occupancy rate for at least 20 years.
....
"You don't want a prison system operating with the goal of maximizing profits," says Texas state Sen. John Whitmire, a Houston Democrat and advocate for reducing prison populations through less costly diversion programs. "The only thing worse is that this seeks to take advantage of some states' troubled financial position."
....
Ohio's deal requires the state to maintain a 90% occupancy rate, but Janes said that provision remains in effect for 18 months — not 20 years — before it can be renegotiated. As part of the deal, Ohio pays the company a monthly fee, totaling $3.8 million per year.

Roger Werholtz, former Kansas secretary of corrections, said states may be tempted by the "quick infusion of cash," but he would recommend against such a deal....."My concern would be that our state would be obligated to maintain these (occupancy) rates and subtle pressure would be applied to make sentencing laws more severe with a clear intent to drive up the population," Werholtz said.

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Response to woo me with science (Reply #13)

Tue Mar 26, 2013, 02:17 PM

29. Anyone signing off on such a guarantee

should be required to help the prison meet it.

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Response to woo me with science (Reply #13)

Tue Mar 26, 2013, 02:23 PM

31. 90% is low.

Other private prison contracts including some with the federal government are in the 93%-95% range.

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Response to woo me with science (Original post)

Tue Mar 26, 2013, 12:37 PM

14. K & R !!!


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Response to woo me with science (Original post)

Tue Mar 26, 2013, 12:39 PM

15. Just imagine if that money went to education and text books weren't from Texas.

People would be smart enough to demand unions and no one would wear teabag hats.

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Response to valerief (Reply #15)

Tue Mar 26, 2013, 05:32 PM

45. Just imagine.

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Response to woo me with science (Original post)

Tue Mar 26, 2013, 01:02 PM

19. Capitalism like for profit prisons

so expect that to be the norm...also private schools. Stupid trend, but our economy likes it so the PTB will keep it up.

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Response to woo me with science (Original post)

Tue Mar 26, 2013, 01:10 PM

23. Just So Disturbing On So Many Levels

This seems straight out of some of the most repressive regimes in South America.

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Response to colsohlibgal (Reply #23)

Tue Mar 26, 2013, 09:46 PM

49. +1 Attaching a profit motive to imprisoning human beings

is morally and ethically despicable.

There is no way to rationalize, justify, or put lipstick on this.

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Response to woo me with science (Original post)

Tue Mar 26, 2013, 02:03 PM

24. Economic prosperity would make this unnecessary.

 

At the risk of point out the obvious, with more than four years of experience, Obama and other 3rd Wayers have no intention of bringing back the American economy for most Americans.

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Response to woo me with science (Original post)

Tue Mar 26, 2013, 02:06 PM

25. Hate to say this but...

A means to employ those soldiers returning from war?

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Response to cynzke (Reply #25)

Tue Mar 26, 2013, 02:12 PM

27. How convenient?

A) bring mfg. to US, B) provide cheap slave labor and C) provide returning soldiers from Iraq and Afghanistan jobs.

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Response to woo me with science (Original post)

Tue Mar 26, 2013, 02:11 PM

26. I keep hearing more and more stories like this

Last edited Tue Mar 26, 2013, 04:26 PM - Edit history (1)

about the Obama admin. It seems to come down to whether you want someone in office who has made a deal with the devil or the devil himself. What a choice.

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Response to woo me with science (Original post)

Tue Mar 26, 2013, 02:33 PM

33. For those who still deny the existence of a police state

here is proof.

And the other hard pill to swallow is that about the only person in any kind of position of power voicing any kind of opposition to this is Rand Paul.

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Response to MindPilot (Reply #33)

Tue Mar 26, 2013, 02:42 PM

37. His baggage though....is hard to ignore...

It comes down to which kind of police state would one choose..with him and his father. What's wrong is that we didn't have enough Dennis Kucinich supporters on the Dem side to make a difference.

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Response to KoKo (Reply #37)

Tue Mar 26, 2013, 02:52 PM

39. Agreed. They advcoate all kinds of freedom except when it comes women's bodies and Jesus.

It has n many ways become a choice between a shit sandwich and a turd croissant.

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Response to MindPilot (Reply #33)

Tue Mar 26, 2013, 02:57 PM

40. What about

"And the other hard pill to swallow is that about the only person in any kind of position of power voicing any kind of opposition to this is Rand Paul."

...Senate Judiciary Committee Chairman Senator Leahy?

Senator Leahy Says “No” to Mandatory Minimums, But Will Congress Listen?
http://www.aclu.org/blog/criminal-law-reform/senator-leahy-says-no-mandatory-minimums-will-congress-listen

Strange Bedfellows Call for Mandatory Minimums Reform
http://www.aclu.org/blog/criminal-law-reform/strange-bedfellows-call-mandatory-minimums-reform

Did President Obama Just Open the Window to Smart Criminal Justice Reform?

By Kara Dansky,

As everyone who follows criminal justice policy knows, the last 40 years have witnessed an American correctional system dominated by tough-on-crime policies and unrelenting growth. Under this four-decade long regime, criminal justice reform has faced an unrelenting wall of resistance.

But there are signs that change is on the horizon. State lawmakers, strapped for resources, have been forced to scrutinize proposals to increase their prison populations. And other issues, such as health care and immigration, have to some extent replaced fear of crime in the public discourse.

Enter President Obama, named as Time magazine Person of the Year. In his interview, President Obama has some potentially promising words about the need for smart criminal justice reform (see page 88 of the magazine, out this morning):

Q: One of the other things that I’ve heard being discussed is the idea of criminal justice reform. What would your goals be in that area?

A: I tend to be pretty conservative, pretty law and order, when it comes to violent crime. My attitude is, is that when you rape, murder, assault somebody, that you’ve made a choice; the society has every right to not only make sure you pay for that crime, but in some cases to disable you from continuing to engage in violent behavior. But there’s a big chunk of that prison population that is involved in nonviolent crimes. And it is having a disabling effect on communities. You have entire populations that are rendered incapable of getting a legitimate job because of a prison record. And it boggles up a huge amount of resources. If you look at state budgets, part of the reason that tuition has been rising in public universities across the country is because more and more resources were going into paying for prisons, and that left less money to provide to colleges and universities. I think we have to figure out what are we doing right to make sure that that downward trend in violence continues, but also are there millions of lives out there that are being destroyed or distorted because we haven’t fully thought through our process?

Q: That means alternative sentencing?
A: Potentially. You can’t put a price on public safety; on the other hand, we’re going to be in an era of fiscal constraint at the state, federal and local levels. It makes sense for us to just ask some tough questions.


- more -

http://www.aclu.org/blog/criminal-law-reform-prisoners-rights/did-president-obama-just-open-window-smart-criminal


This from a President who signed the Fair Sentencing Act.



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Response to ProSense (Reply #40)

Tue Mar 26, 2013, 03:25 PM

42. Yes, I believe I saw that article yesterday

The fact that Lehey and Paul are teaming up on this makes it "strange bedfellows" indeed.

But it is more weasling from the President; we have to look at things, we have ask questions, this is a problem, but again Obama disappointing with no solutions and just some vauge idea that something needs to be done.


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Response to woo me with science (Original post)

Tue Mar 26, 2013, 03:17 PM

41. Damn...

I read the OP title as "The Obama administration is aggressively growing private PENSIONS," and clicked excitedly. Imagine my two-fold disappointment.

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Response to woo me with science (Original post)

Tue Mar 26, 2013, 09:08 PM

47. Let's nationalize the prison industry.

This is something that should not be up for debate. Another group profiting handsomely from our suffering.

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Response to woo me with science (Original post)

Tue Mar 26, 2013, 09:24 PM

48. This is SHAMEFUL.

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Response to Faryn Balyncd (Reply #48)

Wed Mar 27, 2013, 10:01 AM

50. +1 It's unconscionable.

It is corporate "morality" replacing human morality.

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Response to woo me with science (Original post)

Wed Mar 27, 2013, 10:04 AM

51. Stop picking on the President. n/t

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Response to Hotler (Reply #51)

Wed Mar 27, 2013, 10:15 AM

53. I know. It's so unfair.

Probably he is accelerating the imprisonment of human beings for profit, by accident.

It's like when he sent his DOJ all the way to the Supreme Court to argue against strip searches for any arrestee, and when they got there they accidentally argued for the wrong side.

I hate when that happens.

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Response to woo me with science (Original post)


Response to bezrodny (Reply #56)

Sun Mar 31, 2013, 02:32 AM

57. It is being aggressively accelerated under Obama,

through both appointments and federal contracts, as my post made clear. I am not sure why you titled your post to attempt to excuse him, given that the rest of your post seems to recognize the horrific implications of supporting and growing this despicable industry.

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Response to woo me with science (Reply #57)


Response to bezrodny (Reply #58)

Sun Mar 31, 2013, 02:39 AM

59. You obscure the truth. Obama is using our government to support and grow this private industry.

Since he appointed the owner of a private prison consulting firm to head the US Marshals Service, federal contracts for private prisons have exploded.

That is a devastating truth about which you should be outraged.

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Response to woo me with science (Original post)

Sun Apr 14, 2013, 08:37 AM

62. Recommend

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