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Wed Jan 2, 2013, 12:28 PM

How Corn Syrup Might Be Making Us Hungry-and Fat

I thought this was interesting - it offers some evidence about the adverse effects of HFCS that we've suspected was a significant factor in obesity. The bottom line is that fructose doesn't send a message that we're full but glucose does. Both sugars are present in equal amounts in the sucrose molecule but there's more fructose in HFCS so its effect is enhanced.

How Corn Syrup Might Be Making Us Hungry-and Fat

Grocery store aisles are awash in foods and beverages that contain high-fructose corn syrup. It is common in sodas and crops up in everything from ketchup to snack bars. This cheap sweetener has been an increasingly popular additive in recent decades and has often been fingered as a driver of the obesity epidemic.

These fears may be well founded. Fructose, a new study finds, has a marked affect on the brain region that regulates appetite, suggesting that corn syrup and other forms of fructose might encourage over-eating to a greater degree than glucose. Table sugar has both fructose and glucose, but high-fructose corn syrup, as the name suggests, contains a higher proportion of fructose.

To test how fructose affects the brain, researchers studied 20 healthy adult volunteers. While the test subjects consumed sweetened beverages, the researchers used fMRIs (functional magnetic resonance imaging) to measure the response of the hypothalamus, which helps regulate many hunger-related signals, as well as reward and motivation processing.

<snip>

Subjects showed substantial differences in their hypothalamic activity after consuming the fructose-sweetened beverage versus the one sweetened by glucose within 15 minutes. Glucose lowered the activity of the hypothalamus but fructose actually prompted a small spike to this area. As might be expected from these results, the glucose drink alone increased the feelings of fullness reported by volunteers, which indicates that they would be less likely to consume more calories after having something sweetened with glucose than something sweetened with more fructose.

More:

http://news.yahoo.com/corn-syrup-might-making-us-hungry-fat-210000069.html

JAMA article abstract:

http://jama.jamanetwork.com/article.aspx?articleid=1555133

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Reply How Corn Syrup Might Be Making Us Hungry-and Fat (Original post)
QED Jan 2013 OP
global1 Jan 2013 #1
Demonaut Jan 2013 #2
QED Jan 2013 #3
leveymg Jan 2013 #4
FarCenter Jan 2013 #10
Flabbergasted Jan 2013 #26
Kalidurga Jan 2013 #5
LAGC Jan 2013 #12
kentauros Jan 2013 #14
Kalidurga Jan 2013 #18
kentauros Jan 2013 #13
nadinbrzezinski Jan 2013 #19
kentauros Jan 2013 #22
Kalidurga Jan 2013 #20
kentauros Jan 2013 #21
QED Jan 2013 #23
kentauros Jan 2013 #24
hollysmom Jan 2013 #6
Le Taz Hot Jan 2013 #7
pecwae Jan 2013 #27
bongbong Jan 2013 #8
closeupready Jan 2013 #9
thereismore Jan 2013 #11
KittyWampus Jan 2013 #15
Avalux Jan 2013 #16
athena Jan 2013 #17
toddwv Jan 2013 #25
randome Jan 2013 #28
no_hypocrisy Jan 2013 #29
Sirveri Jan 2013 #30

Response to QED (Original post)

Wed Jan 2, 2013, 12:56 PM

1. This Is Interesting Info And I Have A Firsthand Experience .....

Over a year ago I went on a diet where I removed all foods from my diet that contained HFCS. I stopped eating at fast food restaurants. I stopped my intake of soda. I watched everything I ate. I cooked most meals at home. I drank only water. I gave up coffee and sweets. Bottom line I lost 12 lbs and was feeling the best I'd been feeling in years. I had my appetite in control and was not missing any of my former food products that I'd given up.

Then my Mom took sick and I was a 24/7 caregiver for her. I lost even more weight because she wasn't eating and as a result I cut back even more. Well Mom passed away in Oct. Since then I've been working on closing out on her life. Paying her bills, packing up and vacating her former apartment, dealing with insurance companies and my depression and grief.

Unfortunately - I've worked myself into a state of exhaustion and burn-out. Not feeling like cooking I started hitting fast food's again, drinking soda, coffee. Eating sweets and basically not being as careful. Most everything I'm eating has HFCS in it and I've noticed I'm always hungry even when I have a full feeling in my stomach. I am constantly eating and snacking because I have almost an insatiable feeling all the time. In the few short months since her passing I've put back on all the weight I've lost.

I attribute this to falling back into a HFCS addiction again. I'm now beginning to come back to my senses and am trying to break this re-addiction and finding that it is even harder to do this time.

HFCS is bad. Last night I was even thinking that it is a conspiracy unleashed on us American People to get us addicted to HFCS. Why is HFCS in most everything? What is its purpose? Is if flavoring? Is it just a filler and its cheap to add to a food product versus more expensive ingredients?

Are there any movements out there to remove HFCS from foods? What would or could they substitute in its place?

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Response to global1 (Reply #1)

Wed Jan 2, 2013, 01:01 PM

2. sorry for your loss..I agree about the HFC's and a possible conspiracy, the corn lobby and Monasanto

know the risks

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Response to global1 (Reply #1)

Wed Jan 2, 2013, 01:09 PM

3. It's a hard "addiction" to break.

I think it started because HFCS is cheaper than sugar - sucrose. But the expected benefit for the fast food and food industry is that people eat more because they aren't feeling full. So, more profit for them and expanding waistlines for us. Obesity increases, health effects increase, etc. It's a vicious cycle.

The only thing we can do is refuse to buy products with HFCS or unnecessary sugar. I recently needed chicken broth and read the labels. The national brand was basically chicken broth and salt. The store brand had added sugar. Why? I try to buy products without additives as much as I can but it's tough.

That said, I have a horrible sweet tooth and love my chocolate. I can limit it though...most of the time. As you said, stress brings on bad habits.

Sorry to learn your mom died - I know that dealing with the paperwork and sorting everything out is tough. It's confusing and hard to do when we're grieving. Been there.

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Response to QED (Original post)

Wed Jan 2, 2013, 01:34 PM

4. Have they stopped running those reassuring down on the farm "corn sugar same as table sugar" ads?

You know, the one with the trim guy and his cute, skinny daughter in the middle of the corn field.

?w=431&h=284





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Response to leveymg (Reply #4)

Wed Jan 2, 2013, 01:56 PM

10. HFCS is 55% fructose; cane sugar is 50% fructose; both are poison.

Corn syrup, before it is converted, is mostly glucose.

Starch is mostly glucose polymer, and your digestive system depolymerizes it into glucose before it is absorbed in the small intestines.

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Response to FarCenter (Reply #10)


Response to QED (Original post)

Wed Jan 2, 2013, 01:36 PM

5. It's even in bread...

So, I don't eat a lot of bread anymore either. I told my youngest daughter she couldn't have soda with HFCS about 4 years ago. So, she has to get her soda fix at Mexican stores they sell soda called Juaritas (sp?) so, she was fine with that since she could still have an occasional soda. I stopped using most sweeteners about the same time. I still use Nutra Sweet on occasion and table sugar on my oatmeal, it doesn't seem to make me have uncontrolled hunger. I make most my meals from scratch now so I can control the ingredients as a result most my food tastes a lot better, like real food. I make my own ketchup, I am going to make my own bouillon as soon as I get the ingredients, I am going to work on learning how to make a vegetable stock. This has all evolved over the last four years because of the discovery of how much food has HFCS, not that bouillon does, but making my own ketchup has given me the confidence to learn to make other stuff from scratch.

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Response to Kalidurga (Reply #5)

Wed Jan 2, 2013, 02:05 PM

12. You should try brown sugar on your oatmeal.

Tastes better and is supposedly more healthy than table sugar.

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Response to LAGC (Reply #12)

Wed Jan 2, 2013, 02:17 PM

14. That depends on where you get it.

Most grocery-store brown sugar is really just white sugar with about 15% by weight of molasses added back to it. (Learned that in pastry classes.)

Better to get "raw or "turbinado" sugar, or any sugar that hasn't had the molasses content processed out of it.

Also, if you're a vegan, you want to avoid white sugar because it's filtered through a bleached bone substance (usually made from cow bones) to take out even more "impurities".

I need to remember to use molasses more often, as that's where all of the "impurities" and good nutrients went from making table sugar. And like honey, it's considered hygroscopic, very useful when used in bread as the sugar source

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Response to LAGC (Reply #12)

Wed Jan 2, 2013, 02:34 PM

18. I do, but I am out at the moment.

Today is the first not too terribly cold day in a while. So, I can get to the grocery store. I am not sure they have real brown sugar there, but they probably have a good facsimile. I should probably get rid of the table sugar anyway. But, it is left over from my not to distant days of eating foods that aren't good for me at all.

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Response to Kalidurga (Reply #5)

Wed Jan 2, 2013, 02:10 PM

13. If you still want good bread that isn't grocery-store variety,

you have several good options. First, is to find a good bakery in your area. There are at least two within ten minutes of where I live that are excellent bakeries, unaffiliated with grocery stores. The kind of bread you'll find at independent bakeries will mold or go stale within a few days, so it's best to eat it fast, or freeze some of it. For most people, it won't go uneaten for that long

Second, get a bread machine. My old Breadman still makes good bread, and it only takes about ten minutes to load it up. You can probably do it in less time, but I usually heat the water with the sugar source (usually raw honey) before adding the rest of the ingredients to the pan. That way, the yeast has a quicker and more thorough access to the sugars when it begins proofing.

The third option is to get a book like Artisan Bread in Five Minutes A Day. I've never tried this, but plenty in the Cooking & Baking group here have and can tell you more about it

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Response to kentauros (Reply #13)

Wed Jan 2, 2013, 02:35 PM

19. I have, deadly allergic to Gluten

but hubby gets his bread baked at home.

The base recipe is easy as pie.

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Response to nadinbrzezinski (Reply #19)

Wed Jan 2, 2013, 02:49 PM

22. I haven't done any no-gluten baking

though I have baked with spelt flour.

What about rice-flour steam buns? Those are pretty tasty

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Response to kentauros (Reply #13)

Wed Jan 2, 2013, 02:37 PM

20. A good bakery is several miles by bus for me.

So, if I want real bread it does look like I would have to make it myself. I would also have to freeze most of it because I only have myself to cook for and I don't eat a lot of bread. I prefer my oatmeal in the morning and I prefer pastas, rice, or tortillas to bread. But, nothing really beats a good chunk of hearty bread with a bowl of soup.

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Response to Kalidurga (Reply #20)

Wed Jan 2, 2013, 02:48 PM

21. One nice feature on most bread machines

is the "dough mixing" function. You don't have to use the machine to bake it, so you can have the dough in about an hour and a half, then hand-form your loaves or rolls. Bake in your oven, either in a pan or on a pizza/baking stone, cool, cut, consume or freeze

I live alone, too, so I know I'll have to freeze most bread I make, or I'll give away some of it. You can also hand form round loaves and make bread bowls for your soup

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Response to kentauros (Reply #21)

Wed Jan 2, 2013, 03:44 PM

23. I didn't know that it would just mix.

Some of the heavier whole wheat doughs can be hard to mix manually - I've lost partial use of one hand. I've debated getting a heavy duty stand mixer. The Goodwill usually has some bread makers and on sale days they're really inexpensive, maybe $5. Worth a try!

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Response to QED (Reply #23)

Wed Jan 2, 2013, 04:33 PM

24. I know my bread machine will handle a heavy wheat bread,

but I also have a nice stand mixer if I need something heftier in mixing strength. If the cheap bread machine doesn't work out, you can also look at used restaurant supply places. They don't always have the smaller stand mixers, like 5 and 6-qt sizes, just that they are another place to look

I've often thought about how I probably have more money invested over the years in kitchen equipment and supplies than I do in electronics. Yet if I ever have a break-in, I'll expect to see the electronics missing while the Cuisinart, KitchenAid, and VitaMix will remain untouched and unnoticed

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Response to QED (Original post)

Wed Jan 2, 2013, 01:39 PM

6. Funny, but I have not been on a diet (rally need too be, but other priorities) and decided to read l

I was shocked at how much food has corn syrup or whatever. So I cut back on just things that don't need corn syrup added like - rye bread - duh. Started drinking a sugared soda (sorry, I am so weak)

I found that without reducing my food intake, I have not gained weight and am slowly losing weight.

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Response to QED (Original post)

Wed Jan 2, 2013, 01:40 PM

7. It's amazing how many things containg HFCS.

I make my own stock but recently needed some vegetable stock for a recipe and I found I had no more in the freezer. I bought a can of veggies stock, started to use it, and, at the last minute decided to peruse the ingredients. Besides lots of things I've never heard of (veggie stock should have vegetables and water, that's it), I was REALLY surprised to see HFCS listed. In veggie stock.

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Response to Le Taz Hot (Reply #7)

Thu Jan 3, 2013, 07:07 AM

27. I noticed the same thing

during my pre holiday shopping. I've been scrutinizing labels for months, but for the first time in years I reached for vegetable broth. I guess I shouldn't have been surprised when I read that it contained corn syrup. I was startled to see that some of the quinoa sauce mixes that are in the organics section contained HFCS (or just corn corn syrup).

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Response to QED (Original post)

Wed Jan 2, 2013, 01:46 PM

8. Food in the USA

 

Whenever we travel overseas, we eat like kings. Lots of food (if you want it), usually relatively cheap, and never a feeling of bloat or tiredness.

Never forget that the USA is NUMBER ONE! (that is, in food hormones, animal antibiotics, Monsanto additives, GE foods, HFCS, etc)

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Response to QED (Original post)

Wed Jan 2, 2013, 01:52 PM

9. Many snacks have replaced HFCS with sugar.

I've noticed this just in the last couple years - some of my favorite snacks from high school and college were on my no-no list because their primary sweetener was HFCS.

Fast forward to a couple years ago, I fell off a diet I was doing, but still trying to stick to healthy stuff. Sugar isn't healthy, I know, but it's better than HFCS, and I just thought I had to strike most of the snack foods since they all used HFCS.

Boy was I wrong! Many of the popular snack foods have started to use sugar, instead - in fact, if you look at the list of ingredients, you'll find that you probably know what most of them are, surprisingly.

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Response to QED (Original post)

Wed Jan 2, 2013, 02:00 PM

11. Big thanks! nt

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Response to QED (Original post)

Wed Jan 2, 2013, 02:22 PM

15. Sucrose is only marginally better than HFCS. There are lower glycemic alternatives like erythritol

and then there's Stevia which actually improves ones blood sugar levels & insulin resistance.

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Response to QED (Original post)

Wed Jan 2, 2013, 02:29 PM

16. HFCS was not pervasive in food 50 years ago.

Not only is it cheap as a sweetener, it preserves better too, which is why it's added to food you'd never expect. Corn chemically altered to be like sugar confuses the body which doesn't know quite what to do with it. Anyone who claims it's the same as natural sugar is either lying or ignorant.

HFCS has contributed to the trend towards obesity among not only adults but children. I quit buying anything containing it a couple of ago. Cane sugar isn't good in large quantities either (like soda every day), but in moderation is ok, just like everything else (unless a person is diabetic).

As a general rule of thumb, any kind of food closest to their naturally occurring state are the best to eat and best for the body to metabolize.

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Response to QED (Original post)

Wed Jan 2, 2013, 02:33 PM

17. If you're concerned about corn syrup, you should be even more concerned about plastics.

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Response to QED (Original post)

Thu Jan 3, 2013, 01:45 AM

25. Corn syrup gets a bad rap but

ANYTHING highly processed is bad for you.

White sugar, white flour, etc.

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Response to QED (Original post)

Thu Jan 3, 2013, 07:11 AM

28. Why would anyone expect differently from 'beverages' and 'snack aisles'?

Eat food. Drink water, milk or, if you must, coffee and tea. Anyone looking for solace in food or a 'reward' from food is just asking for trouble.

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Response to QED (Original post)

Thu Jan 3, 2013, 07:27 AM

29. Another minus:

HFCS is made of GM corn, with genetically alterred cells and a bath of pesticides.

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Response to QED (Original post)

Thu Jan 3, 2013, 01:32 PM

30. I've done a similar test switching from HFCS soda to sugar sweetened soda.

I used to drink the stuff like it was water, we're talking 4-6 cans a day, with an occasional binge.

Now I drink one or two, and a heck of a lot more water. Only change I made was that one change. The only thing I think it is doing differently for me is satiating me. HFCS just doesn't satiate my sweet tooth, real sugar does, and if I just give my body what it wants it shuts up and I don't binge and I use a whole heckuva lot less calories. It's a step in the right direction as far as I can see. Next is more exercise.

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