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Fri Dec 7, 2012, 08:31 AM

Since 1979, Brian Murtagh has fought to keep convicted murderer Jeffrey MacDonald in prison

WILMINGTON, N.C. — They are old men now, the doctor and the lawyer, ancient adversaries confronting each other one last time.

The doctor shuffles into the courtroom, his feet in socks and slippers, his ankles in chains. Once a swaggering bon vivant with a Maserati, a yacht and a playboy lifestyle, he is now dreadfully diminished, drained of color and of dignity, with a prison pallor and hair gone white, insulted by a prison haircut. He wears a washed-out dun prison-issue jumpsuit with big black letters: INMATE NEW HANOVER COUNTY. The only daub of color is the maroon accordion file he holds. It glistens. It has been so often repaired over the years that it’s more Scotch tape than cardboard. Inside are papers that document a lost life. For nearly half that life, the doctor, 68, has been in federal custody, largely because of the efforts of the government lawyer who sits across the room, at whom he will not look, not even once, in the seven days they will spend together here.

Forty-two years ago, Green Beret Army doctor Jeffrey MacDonald stabbed and bludgeoned to death his pregnant wife, Colette, and his two little girls ... or he didn’t. One currently popular theory is that he didn’t. That’s the contention of the renowned film documentarian Errol Morris, director of “The Thin Blue Line” and “The Fog of War.” When he couldn’t find backers for a movie about the case, Morris wrote the newly released “A Wilderness of Error,” which concludes that MacDonald was railroaded by incompetent cops and overzealous prosecutors, and very likely is no murderer. A New York Times book reviewer agreed, declaring that the book will leave readers “85 percent certain” of MacDonald’s innocence. Also weighing in with an online review was, of all people, Sarah Palin. She loved the book, for reasons of her own.

This evidentiary hearing in September in Wilmington is part of what many believe to be MacDonald’s last chance at freedom. It’s probably the penultimate step in an appeals process that began after the doctor’s initial conviction in 1979 and has continued ever since, driven and financed by a steadfast band of supporters. Private investigators have been deployed; teams of attorneys have been hired and replaced; appellate actions have been filed, argued, dismissed.
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Much more: http://www.washingtonpost.com/lifestyle/magazine/since-1979-brian-murtagh-has-fought-to-keep-convicted-murderer-jeffrey-macdonald-in-prison/2012/12/05/3c8bc1c6-2da8-11e2-89d4-040c9330702a_print.html

This article addresses some of the material put forth that declares that he is innocent. It shows Errol Morris in a new light.
I thought he was guilty then, and I haven't changed my mind since. This answers more questions.

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Reply Since 1979, Brian Murtagh has fought to keep convicted murderer Jeffrey MacDonald in prison (Original post)
Are_grits_groceries Dec 2012 OP
lillypaddle Dec 2012 #1
LiberalEsto Dec 2012 #2
seaglass Dec 2012 #3
Are_grits_groceries Dec 2012 #5
coalition_unwilling Dec 2012 #4

Response to Are_grits_groceries (Original post)

Fri Dec 7, 2012, 10:25 AM

1. I read "Fatal Vision"

way back when, and found it horrifying but mesmerizing. I thought him guilty as well.

I was a true crime aficionado for many years, but it wasn't always easy to find those as well written as "Fatal Vision." Ann Rule's "Small Sacrifices" comes close.

Thanks for posting. Very interesting.

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Response to Are_grits_groceries (Original post)

Fri Dec 7, 2012, 10:38 AM

2. What a story

The McDonald murders happened when I was a hippie college student in NJ. I remember reading about them and thinking that McDonald's claim about chanting hippies was ridiculous. I had never met anyone during my hippie years who seemed capable of doing such a thing, and it seemed he was desperate to cast blame someone other than himself.

I haven't read much about it over the years, but I worked as a crime reporter for a couple of newspapers, and have read a lot of detective fiction. Gene Weingarten's well-written article offers convincing evidence that McDonald deserved to be convicted of slaughtering his wife and small daughters. McDonald is a monster and should never be released.

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Response to Are_grits_groceries (Original post)


Response to seaglass (Reply #3)

Fri Dec 7, 2012, 11:50 AM

5. That would keep me from sleeping

for a long, long time.

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Response to Are_grits_groceries (Original post)

Fri Dec 7, 2012, 11:49 AM

4. Jesus H. Christ, McDonald was hopped up on amphetamines at the time of the attack and

 

suffering the side effects (paranoia, rage, etc.) of being a speed freak.

The holes in the pajama top . . . 21 holes in Collette's body line up perfectly with the 48 holes in her folded pajama top (not all of which penetrated to Collette's body), after McDonald supposedly woke up to find her dead and placed the pajama top on her body??? Evidence DOES NOT LIE.

GUILTY! And a lying sack of shit.

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