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Xipe Totec

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Current location: The Republic of Texas
Member since: Thu Apr 8, 2004, 06:04 PM
Number of posts: 40,550

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Kavanaugh's memory is amazing. Not only can he remember everywhere he's been,

he can remember where he was not.

Without telling him a specific time and place, he can tell you he wasn't there.

Thank you, Anthony Bourdain, for helping me find an ancestral name

My father's maternal last name was Echeverria. Today, watching "Episode Intel from San Sebastián"

I discovered the original name, which is Etxebarri, from the Basque country.

https://explorepartsunknown.com/san-sebastian/episode-intel-from-san-sebastian/


Etxebarri is notoriously hard to find. The Baker and I had explicit directions in our guide book, which were as good as any, but didn’t show any distances or what the “turns” actually looked like. We also had a British GPS, but Jane/Gayle was a little crazy (as we drove on the freeway, going the correct way, she would suddenly direct us to take off onto the Spanish fields alongside). And, we had Pim’s post open on our laptop as well. And it actually took all 3 devices to get us to the tiny town of Axpe, right on time, after allowing double the driving time to allow for the Baker’s slow driving, and for getting lost.

http://foodcharmer.com/2011/06/the-best-meal-i-ever-ate-etxebarri-the-grill-master/



Old Basque saying:

We are because we were.

The Cry of Dolores, September 15, 1810

The Cry of Dolores is an expression associated with the 1810 Mexican revolt against the Spanish, a cry of sorrow and anger from a priest credited with beginning Mexico's struggle for independence from colonial rule.



https://www.thoughtco.com/mexican-independence-the-cry-of-dolores-2136414

The current coat of arms of Mexico (Spanish: Escudo Nacional de México, literally "national shield of Mexico" ) has been an important symbol of politics and culture of Mexico for centuries. The coat of arms depicts a Mexican golden eagle perched on a prickly pear cactus devouring a rattlesnake. The design is rooted in the legend that the Aztec people would know where to build their city once they saw an eagle eating a snake on top of a lake. To the people of Tenochtitlan, this symbol had strong religious connotations, and to the Europeans, it came to symbolize the triumph of good over evil (with the snake sometimes representative of the serpent in the Garden of Eden).



https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Coat_of_arms_of_Mexico

Maria de Estrada Farfan - Conquistadora

Lest we forget: María de Estrada Farfán: Sister of Francisco Estrada Farfán (who went with Narváez to New Spain), daughter of Juan Sánchez de Estrada, of Seville, also came with Narváez. Dorantes said that she did well as a conquistadora at the Noche Triste and Otumba. Muñoz Camargo wrote the same, adding that 'she fought well with sword and shield, with fury and spirit, on horseback and with a lance.'

This is but one of over a dozen women who fought along side the conquistadores in the conquest of Mexico.

Anonymous op-ed author secretly taped - Humor

http://www.dailywav.com/sites/default/files/wavs/crapyjob.wav

I just preordered a copy of "How to Read Donald Duck"

How to Read Donald Duck (Para leer al Pato Donald in Spanish) is a 1971 book-length essay by Ariel Dorfman and Armand Mattelart that critiques Disney comics from a Marxist point of view as being vehicles for American cultural imperialism. It was first published in Chile in 1971, became a bestseller throughout Latin America and is still considered a seminal work in cultural studies. It is to be reissued in August 2018 to a general audience in the United States, with a new introduction by Dorfman, by OR Books.

How to Read Donald Duck was written and published during the brief flowering of revolutionary socialism under the government of Salvador Allende and his Popular Unity coalition and is closely identified with the revolutionary politics of its era. In 1973, a coup d'état, secretly supported by the United States, brought in power the military dictatorship of Augusto Pinochet. During Pinochet's regime, How to Read Donald Duck was banned and subject to book burning; its authors were forced into exile.


https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/How_to_Read_Donald_Duck

They played Jupiter from Holst's 'The Planets' at McCain's funeral

Jupiter represents Zeus, the ruler of Mount Olympus.

Mars is the warrior.

Just one more insult directed at the ignoranus in the White House.

Pedro Palacios Almafuerte - Pui Avanti! - Omage to John McCain

Do not surrender even when defeated,
and do not be a slave even in bondage,
trembling with fear advance bravely,
and attack with fury, though badly wounded.

Be as stubborn as a rusting nail,
that refuses to yield though old and ruined,
and do not envy the peacock's plumage,
that hides in fear at the first noise.

Be as a god that never cries,
or as a devil that never prays,
or as the oak whose mighty canopy,
needs of water but does not beg it.

Even when it rolls to the dust,
let your head scowl and bite,
and scream for vengeance.

- Pedro Palacios Almafuerte
Argentinian poet 1854-1917

Rest in peace, honorable sir.

The Big Picture - Shots of Awe with JASON SILVA

The first photograph taken of earth, from space, occasioned a profound shift in our understanding of ourselves -- an ontological awakening.

Join Jason Silva as he freestyles complex systems of society, technology and human existence and discusses the truth and beauty of science in a form of existential jazz

Beware, fellow plutocrats, the pitchforks are coming Nick Hanauer


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