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Comparing Career Paths: Truck Driving Versus A College Degree

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Renew Deal Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Jun-02-11 10:58 PM
Original message
Comparing Career Paths: Truck Driving Versus A College Degree
Edited on Thu Jun-02-11 10:59 PM by Renew Deal
From TruckingTruth.com:

I decided to hypothetically put two people seeking professional careers, one a prospective college student, the other a truck driving school candidate, up against each other in a comparison of job training, annual salary, debt accumulation, and investment capability throughout their careers. Well start the time frame with the student entering college and the truck driver entering truck driving school.
<snip>

To be fair, we will base the cost of the college students tuition on an average of $16,000 at an in-state public university, and about $33,000 for a private school each year for 4 years. These costs include tuition, fees, books, room and board and other expenses.

The Cost Of CDL Training Versus A College Degree


The average cost of training at a truck driving school is around $1,500 to $3,500. Some truck driving schools pay for room and board and some truck driving schools sponsored by trucking companies pay the student wages while they are training. Trucking company schools will often pay for some, if not all of a students training if the student agrees to work for them for one year.
<snip>

4 years and 3 months later: Congratulations to our college student! Happy graduation! Your debt is $68,000 to $140,250, plus interest. Your starting salary as an Electrical Engineer is $54,599. Our truck driver has earned $60,000 dollars this year and his home value is up $12,500 above the purchase price. His investment portfolio balance is around $45,000 dollars.
<snip>

Now if you look at the college students $68,000 to $140,250 debt compared to the drivers balance of $65,000 plus home equity, we have as much as a $200,000 difference at about 5 years. The college student has the power of interest working against him, while the truck driver has the power of compounding interest working in his favor!
<snip>

http://www.truckingtruth.com/trucking_blogs/cls2009/201...
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flvegan Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Jun-02-11 11:03 PM
Response to Original message
1. Can I add...you'll never be able to outsource/offshore many trucking jobs.
We will always need truckers, regardless of how our corporations would love to send every job overseas somewhere.

Mad respect for our folks that drive for a living. I couldn't do it. Well, I could but a simple drive down the highway would look like a horrible Bruce Willis movie scene.
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LetTimmySmoke Donating Member (970 posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Fri Jun-03-11 12:20 AM
Response to Reply #1
27. That's what I thought.
Except for when congress decides that we don't have enough truck driving skill in this country and have to bring in foreign workers to do it.
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awoke_in_2003 Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Fri Jun-03-11 12:30 AM
Response to Reply #1
28. Don't forget that NAFTA
allows Mexican truck drivers to operated on our roads with substandard equipment.
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phasma ex machina Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Jun-02-11 11:07 PM
Response to Original message
2. Kids go to college because it humiliates their parents to speak of their daughter the trucker.
Propaganda works.
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Brigid Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Jun-02-11 11:11 PM
Response to Reply #2
4. But I'll bet Lisa from IRT has parents who are very proud of her.
Edited on Thu Jun-02-11 11:14 PM by Brigid
Their daughter, the TV star! :rofl:

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phasma ex machina Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Jun-02-11 11:31 PM
Response to Reply #4
13. Agreed, you'd win that bet. nt
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awoke_in_2003 Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Fri Jun-03-11 12:31 AM
Response to Reply #4
29. she walked into a male dominated world...
and, from everything I have seen of her, has done nothing but try to increase her knowledge. Her parents should be proud.
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lumberjack_jeff Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Fri Jun-03-11 12:10 AM
Response to Reply #2
24. Not me.
Edited on Fri Jun-03-11 12:18 AM by lumberjack_jeff
My 21 year old truck driver son is home for the weekend making arrangements to buy our rental house. If I invest even half what college would have cost into that house, we'll both come out ahead.

The training schools usually provide training gratis provided you drive for them for a year. After two years, jobs are plentiful for local home-every-night routes.

The only flaw in the calculation above is that you can't get a CDL until you're 21.

Driving a truck was exactly what he wanted to do, from the time he was young.
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Lugnut Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Fri Jun-03-11 12:49 AM
Response to Reply #2
33. My son is a successful owner/operater.
He bought his first truck in 2004 and has prospered through some of the toughest years for independents. His new truck is almost a year old and he works every day. If my daughter had gone that route I'd be just as proud of her as I am of him.
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ohnoyoudidnt Donating Member (250 posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Jun-02-11 11:08 PM
Response to Original message
3. Good for the truck driver.
Edited on Thu Jun-02-11 11:20 PM by ohnoyoudidnt
Of course, you have to consider the major. Some will get you jobs paying more than others and some will get you jobs in a career you have a passion for, which is worth more than not making as much money. And jobs that won't require you to be away from home for long periods of time.

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pitohui Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Jun-02-11 11:16 PM
Response to Original message
5. well there's something wrong here because most truckers i know aren't doing that well
Edited on Thu Jun-02-11 11:19 PM by pitohui
there has to be something wrong w. your math, because i don't know many truckers who have an investment portfolio of 45,ooo dollars or any dollars for that matter -- i realize they exist but it seems like truckers were much more prosperous (relative to other workers) in the 1970s! (they could earn a lot more overtime for example)

many of them end up in the self employment trap which means that expenses get everything they stand to make

the value of a college degree is not so much the money but the hope that somebody might actually give you a JOB, if you have to provide your own benefits, esp. health insurance, vacation/sick days, and retirement planning, you just can't catch up to the guy who has a JOB

that said, if the college degree doesn't get you a JOB, if you end up self employed anyway, you're double fucked

we had a guy who started working as a trucker posting in the lounge, nice guy, worked hard, but i think he has lasted a little over a year and is already looking to settle down and get out...

common sense will tell you that IF it really only costs $3K to get a CDL *AND* get jobs paying good money, no one would be going to college, everybody would already be a trucker, i mean...the overwhelming majority of us can drive....there's more to it than that, and the killer expenses that take all the profit out of it are what i always hear talked about
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xmas74 Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Jun-02-11 11:20 PM
Response to Reply #5
6. It takes a certain type.
My uncle has done it for nearly 40 years now and loves it. He does well for himself, owns a small house on a few acres, has money saved, etc. I know he did it by spending lots of time on the road, which is why he's been married four times now. (At least I think that's why-more time on the road and not at home.)

The work is good if you're willing to travel and that has to be overnight, home a couple of days a month kind of travel. For the daily grind it's not the best field.
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tim_whatley_dentist Donating Member (6 posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Jun-02-11 11:27 PM
Response to Reply #5
9. good point
check unemployment rates for folks with and w/o a college degree.

There's nothing wrong with being a truck driver, but let's be real here.
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Renew Deal Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Jun-02-11 11:28 PM
Response to Reply #5
11. I think it's a lifestyle thing too.
You have to be willing to be away from home for long stretches of time. It's really not for everyone.
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tim_whatley_dentist Donating Member (6 posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Jun-02-11 11:34 PM
Response to Reply #5
18. lol
Also while we are stereotyping on the most simplistic level, we also need to compare all the ass the college grad got while in school to the grade A crank the truck driver has access to on a daily basis. ;)
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lumberjack_jeff Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Fri Jun-03-11 12:13 AM
Response to Reply #5
25. Common sense ain't what it used to be.
College is not an economic investment, it's a lifestyle purchase.
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Warren Stupidity Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Fri Jun-03-11 06:11 AM
Response to Reply #5
44. The value of a college degree, on average, is actually "the money" too.
If you look at all college vs non-college wages, a college education remains a great investment, on average, for those who can afford it. One can always construct anecdotal evidence to demonstrate the opposite, but so what? Are there people without college degrees who make more money that other people with college degrees? Of course.
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tim_whatley_dentist Donating Member (6 posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Jun-02-11 11:25 PM
Response to Original message
7. sooooo
what about 5 years later when the engineer's salary has tripled?
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Renew Deal Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Jun-02-11 11:27 PM
Response to Reply #7
8. Not all college graduates are engineers
And not all engineer salaries triple. And truckers don't have the hefty student loans. I think the point this person is making is that truckers that stick with it have a nice head start of college grads.
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tim_whatley_dentist Donating Member (6 posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Jun-02-11 11:31 PM
Response to Reply #8
12. re
OF course they do, but their lifetime earning ceilings are much lower than most college grads.

Like I said, nothing against driving a truck it's a fine profession.
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xmas74 Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Jun-02-11 11:34 PM
Response to Reply #12
17. Some would call trucking to be part of the trades route.
Some trades can make more than many degreed fields, depending on what is chosen.

I really think the idea of this is to get people to think about what they really want. Tradework is considered by some sections of society to be "dirty" and "trashy". Maybe articles of this nature will make some who are unsure of what they really want reconsider what to do with their lives.
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xmas74 Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Jun-02-11 11:31 PM
Response to Reply #7
14. If it has tripled
and if the person stays in engineering.

I think the point is that sometimes you have to think outside of the box. College is associated as the "be-all and end-all" way of making a good career and overall good life for yourself.

Do I support education? You bet your bippy I do. The problem is that it really isn't for everyone and that there should be some respect shown for the trades.

If I were 19 again I'd consider training in electrical, plumbing, heating and cooling, etc, instead of what is now considered the "traditional" route. I'd be better off now.
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phasma ex machina Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Jun-02-11 11:32 PM
Response to Reply #7
16. It gets outsourced. nt
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girl gone mad Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Fri Jun-03-11 01:26 AM
Response to Reply #7
35. The company starts scouting Chinese engineers..
who will happily work for 10% of the now grossly overpaid American engineer.
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Warren Stupidity Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Fri Jun-03-11 06:05 AM
Response to Reply #7
42. hush we are busy propagating a meme
This meme is supposed to make us feel good about the defunding of public education, and the withdrawal of the guarantee from the 1960's that everyone could have access to an affordable college education. The de-investment in higher education is an odd national policy at a time when global post industrial work forces can only compete on two levels: wages, and technical expertise. Heck of a national policy.
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FarLeftFist Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Jun-02-11 11:28 PM
Response to Original message
10. You could also get a CDL
and not drive cross country tractor trailers, I know people with CDL class B licenses that drive a Budweiser truck (about 25 ft long) making deliveries and makes $30/hr, has a set schedule and goes home to his family every night. There are MANY different jobs requiring a CDL license and CDL drivers are always in demand.
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Renew Deal Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Jun-02-11 11:32 PM
Response to Reply #10
15. Does an A license allow you to drive B and C class vehicles?
You should see the restrictions on "hazardous materials" drivers. They need to be cleared by the DHS!
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xmas74 Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Jun-02-11 11:35 PM
Response to Reply #15
19. My dad used to have haz cert
and it didn't need DHS years ago.

Times have changed.
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Renew Deal Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Jun-02-11 11:44 PM
Response to Reply #19
21. It may have changed
Edited on Thu Jun-02-11 11:52 PM by Renew Deal
Or maybe it's a NY rule...

"Any size vehicle that requires hazardous materials placards or is carrying material listed as a select agent or toxin in 42 CFR part 73. Federal regulations through the Dept. of Homeland Security require a background check and fingerprinting for the Hazardous Materials endorsement."

http://www.nydmv.state.ny.us/broch/cdl/cdl10sec01.pdf
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xmas74 Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Jun-02-11 11:51 PM
Response to Reply #21
23. No,times have changed.
It's probably a national law and for good reason. He had his before 9-11 so things have changed.

He used to haul anhydrous for area farmers so he definitely needed the placard.
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Angleae Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Fri Jun-03-11 03:23 AM
Response to Reply #23
40. Did you dad need Dept of Transportation approval back then.
DoT now part of DHS.
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xmas74 Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Fri Jun-03-11 03:26 PM
Response to Reply #40
54. I'd need to ask
but I believe he did for most haz mat.
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tim_whatley_dentist Donating Member (6 posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Jun-02-11 11:37 PM
Response to Reply #15
20. re
Does an A license allow you to drive B and C class vehicles?

You mean like Fords and Chevys? ;)
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Renew Deal Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Jun-02-11 11:45 PM
Response to Reply #20
22. Ha!
You clearly haven't met DainBramaged yet. :D
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A HERETIC I AM Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Fri Jun-03-11 12:41 AM
Response to Reply #15
31. Yes.
A "Class A" is combination vehicles (Tractor trailers or truck/trailer combinations) and air brakes. If you have those you can drive any smaller truck, which a B or C is, such as a dump truck or similar or any straight truck with 2 or 3 axles, whether they have hydraulic brakes or air brakes.

I have a Class A with the following endorsements;
Doubles and Triple Trailers
Tankers
Hazardous Materials

I also have a Motorcycle endorsement.

The only one I don't have, and the only one left to get is for passenger buses, but when I inquired about getting one in Florida, I found out I would have to bring a bus to the test center and have a road test. So I didn't bother. I left my bus in my other pants!
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jmowreader Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Fri Jun-03-11 01:31 AM
Response to Reply #15
36. Yes, a Class A CDL lets you drive Class B and C vehicles
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Liquorice Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Fri Jun-03-11 12:19 AM
Response to Original message
26. Driving an 18 wheeler would be pretty grueling for most people. I
had a friend growing up whose dad was a truck driver. He was always gone and she was always missing him. He was never there for her games, etc. They didn't have much money either. For the right person, I guess driving a truck would be a good job, but it would be a nightmare for most people who have family they like to spend time with.
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skirt6 Donating Member (22 posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Fri Jun-03-11 06:53 AM
Response to Reply #26
45. No job is for everyone. Driving a big-rig DOES present problems
My father, grandfather, parent-in-laws, and even my brother-in-law all drive a truck. Long haul truckers are away from home a lot of the time, and yeah it sucks when Dad misses your games or whatever. Time you can't get back. However, if you have a family, you have to support them. Sometimes working at McDonald's just ain't gonna do it. Driving a truck was the way my dad could consistently put food on the table, keep a roof over our heads, and shoes on our feet. Sure we only saw him once a month (until he got a local job where he's home most nights) but he was home for a week at a time and the time we had was always precious and more appreciated. With today's technology, many Daddies out on the road now can enjoy a web chat with their kids, cell phone conversations with their wives, and it makes it a little easier.
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MadHound Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Fri Jun-03-11 12:33 AM
Response to Original message
30. First of all, few truckers make sixty grand a year.
Second of all, trucking is a job that wears on your health quickly.

Most truckers, while making a a decent salary of around thirty to forty thousand, are facing ever stiffer competition from Russians, East Europeans and Mexicans that are driving wages down, down, down.

Truckers suffer from a variety of maladies, which generally include hypertension, high blood pressure, obesity, Type II diabetes, etc. Many, many trucker has to be hauled out of truck after collapsing from a heart attack or stroke.

Not to mention that you're on the road all the time, missing your home, missing your life.
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Art_from_Ark Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Fri Jun-03-11 12:44 AM
Response to Original message
32. Long-haul drivers often have to pay a lot of expenses out of pocket
If they own their own rig, they have to make payments on that-- plus pay for fuel, maintenance, insurance, motels. On top of that, they have to spend a lot of time away from home, and drive under all sorts of crappy conditions.

On the other hand, an in-state undergraduate student at the University of Arkansas can get an education for a LOT cheaper than $16,000/year
http://treasurer.uark.edu/tuition.asp?ssemester=Fall
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A HERETIC I AM Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Fri Jun-03-11 01:22 AM
Response to Reply #32
34. The key to your statement is .....
"If they own their own rig".

The overwhelming majority of long haul drivers in this country are not Owner Operators, so therefore your subject line is a bit misleading. Also, many companies that hire OO's have fuel discount programs and national maintenance accounts, so repairs are paid for at a discount, a well as assistance for, or outright payment for things like permits, tolls, loading/unloading pay (called "Lumper" pay) and tires.

Driving in all sorts of crappy conditions is what allows you to have all the fresh produce at your grocery in the winter in Arkansas, not to mention everything else. (I know you know this, Art...just pointing it out) Not to mention, I find it fun! And a challenge. I take great pride in the fact that I can count at least 50,000 miles total over the years driving in winter conditions in an 18 wheeler and never so much as put a scratch on another thing. I've been rear-ended 3 times by automobiles, but I've never hit a thing. And I'm talking everything from Black Ice, to white-out conditions to snow falling 2 inches an hour kind of blizzards.
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Art_from_Ark Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Fri Jun-03-11 01:33 AM
Response to Reply #34
37. Believe it or not
I had actually undergone some training for truck driving. And there were a few trucking companies in my area (like J.B.Hunt) that could have provided employment. But after considering all aspects of the profession, and talking to some long-haulers (including a family friend, who was almost never at home), I decided it would be better to pursue a different career path.
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Art_from_Ark Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Fri Jun-03-11 10:07 AM
Response to Reply #34
52. By the way
I've also worked as a "lumper"-- at one of the Wal-Mart warehouses in Bentonville. $18 for 4 hours work (and I had to pay my own transportation). Didn't make much, but I got to talk to a lot of truckers that way.
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ChoppinBroccoli Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Fri Jun-03-11 01:33 AM
Response to Original message
38. I'll Never Forget...............
.............I was about 2 years out of law school, working as an attorney in a small firm, working long hours, doing basically ALL the work, and getting paid a pittance. I sat down with a guy who was going through a divorce. He was a truck driver. When we started discussing his financials, I realized that this guy who had a high school education (if that) and drove a truck was making almost THREE TIMES what I was making (and I'm sure he didn't have over $80,000 of student debt like I did either). That's when I really started to question the logic of higher education.

By the way, it's important to note that I'm not demeaning the truck driver for being a truck driver, or trying to imply in any way that I was better than him or more deserving than him of being paid well, or anything like that. I actually drove a truck when I was in college, so I know what that is all about. I was simply trying to say that all your life, you're told that the only way you're going to "succeed" in life is to get an education and get a good job. Well, I had both, and I was barely scraping by. Then, a few years later, I completed the "Republican playbook" and started my own business (because that's what any Republican will tell you to do: get an education, get a good job, start a business, and you'll be set for life). And I'm STILL not making as much as a truck driver. But I'm sure it's only because I'm lazy or unworthy in some way (at least that's what I'm told whenever I run into one of these "pull yourself up by your bootstraps" A-holes).
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renate Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Fri Jun-03-11 02:53 AM
Response to Original message
39. I think a lot depends on whether you'd rather drive a truck or be an engineer
They're both great professions for those who enjoy them. Someone who was born to be an engineer but who for financial reasons ends up as a truck driver isn't going to be any happier than someone who was born to be a truck driver but for financial reasons ends up as an engineer.

:shrug:
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MrDiaz Donating Member (365 posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Fri Jun-03-11 05:38 AM
Response to Original message
41. My Uncle
Is a truck driver and has been for as long as I can remember. When he was younger he was always on the road, and worked for company that let the drivers use their trucks, but of course if you use their trucks you don't make that much money. He had to save alot of money, paid off his house, then got another loan for his own rig. Once he got his own rig, he was able to make alot more money. But like I said, he was always on the road, his family suffered due to his work.

On the other hand, a cousin of mine just graduated college with a degree in business logistics. He wasn't out of college a week, and had already had his choice of 3 different companys to work for. He walked in as the head over his companys logistics department. His starting pay is between $60,000 and $70,000. And i think he only has about $25,000 in student loans. He is doing very good for himself at the young age of 22.

My uncle (who is now 50 years old) worked his ass off and inquired alot of debt before he was able to start making real money and live comfortable. He is now doing very well for himself.
My cousin went to college 4 years, got his degree and is doing damn good at the age of 22.

If I had the choice I would of went to college. Lol but now it looks like I'm headed for my Uncle's path.
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WinkyDink Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Fri Jun-03-11 06:07 AM
Response to Original message
43. What an incredibly myopic basis for comparison.
Edited on Fri Jun-03-11 06:11 AM by WinkyDink
And I have a 47-year-old female cousin who is a long-haul trucker.
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JoePhilly Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Fri Jun-03-11 07:06 AM
Response to Original message
46. There is a reason that the wealthy aren't sending their kids to truck driving school.
If your post reflected reality, the wealthy would not be sending their kids to college. They'd be sending them to truck driving school.

The right wing in this country wants you to believe that an education is a bad thing. Science is bad, knowledge is bad ... and attending a University will only teach you "liberal values".

Sadly, some in the middle and on the left are falling for this nonsense.

I do enjoy the trick of stopping at 5 years. The author might as well have stopped after one year. Of course if you carry this game out over a life time, our truck driver dies in a trailer park, his kids don't have the money to go to college ... meanwhile, our college student owns a single home in the suburbs, has a growing 401k, and he's able to pay for his kids college.
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MindPilot Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Fri Jun-03-11 08:26 AM
Response to Original message
47. Truck driving looks like one of the most boring jobs possible.
Obviously it has its moments, but I find driving to be one of the most brain-dead mind-numbingly boring things I have to do on a regular basis. After about 30 minutes I'm ready for a nap. I did not become a truck driver for the same reason I didn't become an airline pilot...it is endless hours, trapped in a confined space doing absolutely nothing. My respect goes out those who can do it.

Besides I would much rather fix the truck than drive the truck.
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WatsonT Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Fri Jun-03-11 08:33 AM
Response to Original message
48. Some people would definitely be better off learning a trade than going to college
I wish that were a more acceptable route but it seems to be either you go to a 4 year university or you're an uneducated redneck of no value.

There is no middle ground.

When in reality certain jobs like mechanic, carpenter, machinist, etc are fine jobs, require no expensive 4 year degree and will keep many people comfortably middle class for life.
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xmas74 Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Fri Jun-03-11 03:34 PM
Response to Reply #48
55. Even here on DU
there seems to be a similar belief that the trades are not worthy to pursue.

Not everyone can hack it as a tradesman but not everyone can hack it as a doctor.
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Shagbark Hickory Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Fri Jun-03-11 08:41 AM
Response to Original message
49. The trucker "couldn't be happier" ?!?! LOL Maybe the truckers on DU can chime in
Edited on Fri Jun-03-11 08:43 AM by Shagbark Hickory
and tell us how happy they are being home 2 days a month.
Or how they love waiting and waiting and waiting for loads.
OR how they love their compensation package.

Lots of problems with this comparison. Not all colleges cost that much.
I don't know where the home equity comes in to play but if we've learned anything in the past 3 years is you can't count on that.
IT also seems to ignore that the electrical engineer's salary will increase as time goes on and will probably outpace the truck driver's salary (if they even have a salary) before long.

I dunno, Maybe the article was talking about UPS drivers. In my area, they get paid by the hour though. In some areas I think they make a lot but there's a shelf life to that kind of worker. And one measley accident and they're through with.

I have no doubts there are truckers who are happier than electrical engineers. And vice versa.
But this math is flawed. The article was probably written by a recruiter.
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tabbycat31 Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Fri Jun-03-11 08:49 AM
Response to Original message
50. I have nothing but the utmost respect for truckers
Last month, I returned from an 18 hour drive home (WI to NJ) for my job (which takes me all over the country depending on the political environment) and I don't know how people do that kind of driving on a daily basis.

I've already told myself that if I go back to WI this fall (there's a chance I could) I am flying there and buying a clunker on craigslist to use while there.
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NoGOPZone Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Fri Jun-03-11 08:58 AM
Response to Original message
51. One of the richest guys i ever met started out as a truck driver
Formed a business was with one truck and grew it into an organization with hundreds of drivers.
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dmallind Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Fri Jun-03-11 10:11 AM
Response to Original message
53. It's called deferred gratification. Compare them again at 42 not 22
Edited on Fri Jun-03-11 10:11 AM by dmallind
Notwithstanding that suspicious 12.5k home gain in last 4 years (from the peak of the bubble!)

By that time th EE is now a plant manager making 130k, and the truck driver, who never sees his suspiciously value-gaining home if he drives enough miles to earn $60k, is still only making 60k.

And of course while "some trucking schools/companies pay X..." there is of course no chance for the student to get grantrs or scholarships or even a PT job to reduce his loan total.

I don't know if they teach driving well or not at CDL school, but if this is an example they sure as hell don't teach basic financial analysis.
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