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SHRED Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Apr-02-09 11:30 AM
Original message
"President Hamid Karzai has just signed...
Edited on Thu Apr-02-09 11:30 AM by SHRED
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...a law that forces women to obey their husbands sexual demands, keeps women from leaving the houseeven for work or schoolwithout a husbands permission, automatically grants child custody rights to fathers and grandfathers before mothers, and favors men in inheritance disputes and other legal matters. In short, the law again consigns Afghan women to lives of brutal repression."

http://www.truthdig.com/report/item/20090401_silence_me... /

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What a shithead.

Is this who we are fighting for?

:argh:

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cliffordu Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Apr-02-09 11:33 AM
Response to Original message
1. Yep. This is our good ally.
Edited on Thu Apr-02-09 11:34 AM by cliffordu
The saudis whipped and jailed a raped woman and in Iran they are set to execute gay men and now this tidbit.

WTF are we doing?

Oh, yeah..., Oil.
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atreides1 Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Apr-02-09 11:35 AM
Response to Reply #1
2. Just one thing wrong
The Saudis and the Afghans are our "friends", in my opinion they should be listed in the same column as the Iranians.

But, I'm a radical anyway.
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formercia Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Apr-02-09 12:40 PM
Response to Reply #2
14. Even the Iranians treat women better.
They're not even close to the Saudis.
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leftchick Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Apr-02-09 11:36 AM
Response to Original message
3. it was never about 'freedoms'
unless it means freedom to pipeline access.
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redqueen Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Apr-02-09 11:39 AM
Response to Reply #3
5. Yep.
All the rest was window-dressing to sell it.
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saigon68 Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Apr-02-09 12:46 PM
Response to Reply #3
15. Yes the "Mayor of Kabul" plays all sides
Edited on Thu Apr-02-09 12:46 PM by saigon68
He is our puppet



The country is no different than it was 20 years ago

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daleo Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Apr-02-09 11:38 AM
Response to Original message
4. But people can fly kites now (well, male people)
And the opium poppies are safe.
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progressoid Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Apr-02-09 12:00 PM
Response to Original message
6. 
There's a reason that the Taliban was able to flourish there. They have support from a lot of Afghanis. And apparently their ideas are still valued too.
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SHRED Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Apr-02-09 12:09 PM
Response to Reply #6
9. So it begs the question:
---

What are we doing there trying to "nation build"?

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G_j Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Apr-02-09 12:05 PM
Response to Original message
7. but he needs to be reelected
jeez, what a bunch of purists people are!
we all know politics is all about compromise.
:sarcasm:
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G_j Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Apr-02-09 12:09 PM
Response to Reply #7
10. Helping Afghan Women and Girls
http://www.commondreams.org/view/2009/02/03-13

Published on Tuesday, February 3, 2009 by The Nation

Helping Afghan Women and Girls
by Katrina Vanden Heuvel w/ Kavita Ramdas

As the coalition I'm working with--Get Afghanistan Right--continues to make the case that the Obama administration would be wise to rethink its plan to escalate militarily in Afghanistan, I've tried to engage the arguments made by some feminists and human rights groups who believe that such an escalation is necessary to protect Afghani women and girls. I share their horror when I read stories like this one by New York Times reporter Dexter Filkins describing an acid attack against girls and women--students and their teachers--at the Mirwais School for Girls. But how will escalation or increased US troop presence improve their security or make their lives better?
I thought it would be important to speak with someone who has experience working on the ground with Afghan women's organizations. Kavita Ramdas is President and CEO of the Global Fund for Women. For 15 years she has worked with groups like the Afghan Institute for Learning--which serves about 350,000 women and children in their schools, health care centers, and human rights programs.

This is what Kavita said:

We're hearing from groups we've worked with for over a 15 year period now, on the ground inside Afghanistan and with Afghan women's groups and Pakistan as well.

First, I think it's remarkable that our approach to foreign policy --not just for the last eight years, but with regard to Afghanistan and Pakistan in general over the last thirty years--has been almost entirely military focused. There hasn't been any willingness to take a cold hard look at how effective or ineffective that strategy has been in whether or not it has helped stabilize the country. And there has been much less attention paid to whether this militaristic approach has done anything positive for the women of Afghanistan. It's doubtful whether America's foreign policy has ever had the welfare of Afghan women at heart. As many Afghani women have said to us, 'You know, you didn't even think about us 25 years ago,' and then all of a sudden post 9-11, we're sending troops to Afghanistan and ostensibly we're very concerned about women. But there's very little willingness to really look at the implications of a military strategy on women's security. It is very important to begin with the following question: If the strategies that we used up to this point have not succeeded in ensuring the safety and well being of women and girls, what makes us think that increased militarization with 30,000 additional US troops is somehow going to improve the situation and security of women in Afghanistan?

The second question is, what has been the role of the existing troops in Afghanistan with regard to the situation and the security of women? In general, what happens when regions become highly militarized, and when there are "peace-keeping forces," militias, as well as foreign troops--which is NATO and the United States, primarily? In most parts of the world, highly militarized societies in almost every instance lead to bad results for women. The security of women is not improved and in many instances it actually becomes worse.

What do I mean by that? Take for example Afghanistan. In 2003, almost every woman's group I met with in Afghanistan, which was already a few years after the initial invasion, said that although they were very grateful for the fact that the Taliban was gone, the presence of foreign troops in Afghanistan in general and in Kabul in particular had highly increased the incidence of both prostitution as well as trafficking-- it's not one in the same thing. Prostitution in the sense of--being something "voluntary" because very poor women and girls would come down, particularly from the countryside where villages are in a state of absolute dire impoverishment...there's very little to eat, very little production...I talked to so many women and women's organizations who've said, young girls sleep with a soldier in Kabul for $40, $50, which is more than their mothers could make as a teacher in a full month. That's the incidence of prostitution as a function of--people call it in the women's movement "survival sex." The trading of sex for food on a survival basis.

..more..
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vadawg Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Apr-02-09 12:08 PM
Response to Original message
8. i hate to say it but what can you do, unless you force your values on everyone at gunpoint
theres always gonna be different norms and taboos, and whose to say that your ideals are right and the guy down the street is wrong. Ive got no idea how you can reconcile the differences and thats coming from someone who lives in america but is from what some would call a medieval culture.
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uppityperson Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Apr-02-09 01:15 PM
Response to Reply #8
16. You got it in these words "medieval culture".
How to help things change so work, education, healthcare can lead to helping people get out of the medieval culture. Yes, there will be those who wish to stay there, but figuring out how to help those who don't want that not have to be subjected to it.

It would take money and a concentrated effort by world powers, world countries who are past that. I am not talking quick or easy answers here, and not just for Afghanistan but for a whole lot of the world. How to balance the haves and have-lesses.

However, simply excusing oppression by saying "different norms" is also wrong. I don't know how to make it so that only those who want to participate have to, if I were queen of the universe I would, but I'm not. But that is what I would like to see. Yes, you can have an oppressive culture, if everyone there is fine with being oppressed/oppressors. But everyone, every single person, would need to individually be fine with themselves being like that.

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spoony Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Apr-02-09 12:14 PM
Response to Original message
11. Blood and money, scattered in the desert,
for absolutely nothing. :(
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bkkyosemite Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Apr-02-09 12:24 PM
Response to Original message
12. Male PIG!
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wisteria Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Apr-02-09 12:39 PM
Response to Original message
13. I deplore the treatment of women in this way.
However, I believe there is more to this sad signing and it has a lot to do with the reemergence of the Tali ban and America's lack of attention to Afghanistan for so long. Karzai has begged us to help him in his fight against the Tali ban for years now, but most of his pleas were ignored by the Bush Administration- and we know why that was.
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nichomachus Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Apr-02-09 01:56 PM
Response to Original message
17. Afghanistan =aka "The Destroyer of Empires"
We're next . . .
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NickB79 Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Apr-02-09 02:00 PM
Response to Original message
18. And for this, how many American soldiers sacrificed their lives?
Fucking sick shit.
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PM Martin Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Apr-02-09 11:22 PM
Response to Original message
19. "Sharia Law" is the "bible" of the Devil!
:puke: :argh: :mad:
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New Dawn Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu Apr-02-09 11:55 PM
Response to Original message
20. Kabul's mayor does not sound much different than the Taliban.
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