Democratic Underground Latest Greatest Lobby Journals Search Options Help Login
Google

Homeschooling group: Save children from the HELL of govt. education!

Printer-friendly format Printer-friendly format
Printer-friendly format Email this thread to a friend
Printer-friendly format Bookmark this thread
This topic is archived.
Home » Discuss » Archives » General Discussion (01/01/06 through 01/22/2007) Donate to DU
 
Bluebear Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Fri Feb-24-06 09:14 PM
Original message
Homeschooling group: Save children from the HELL of govt. education!
:crazy:

Contact: Charles B. Lowers, Considering Homeschooling, 949-439-9949, info@consideringhomeschooling.com

Guide to Help Save the Next Generation of Christians

LAGUNA HILLS, Calif., Feb. 24 /Christian Wire Service/ -- Considering Homeschooling has introduced a new guide to that encourages Christians to start homeschool outreaches to their fellow believers in Christ.

The "Considering Homeschooling Outreach Guide: A Guide to Reaching the New Generation of Christian Homeschoolers" is available as a free download from the Considering Homeschooling website: www.consideringhomeschooling.com .

"Taking action in your church with this guide may not only help save children from the hell of preschool and government education," said Charles B. Lowers, Executive Director of Considering Homeschooling, "but it might help save those children from an everlasting hell."

"While homeschooling in America is on the rise, private biblical homeschooling is actually facing possible extinction," said Lowers, "But, God has provided a way for biblical homeschooling to increase tremendously, if we intercede in prayer and take action. With this guide you can find out what the predators are in the new educational landscape and why there much to be hopeful about."

"God has opened a door for revival -- true spiritual revival of Christian families, our churches, and our nation -- under the simple biblical premise that fathers are responsible for raising up their own children in the Lord," said Lowers. "We have a vision for victory against universal preschool and government education because Christ has already won the victory."

This guide gives pastors and leaders practical steps for reaching Christian families that are just starting out -- those with babies, toddlers, preschoolers -- about teaching their children at home and from a biblical worldview. Considering Homeschooling asks Christians who believe in home education to forward the link to the guide to others who might start outreaches.

http://www.earnedmedia.org/ch0224.htm
Printer Friendly | Permalink |  | Top
 
CottonBear Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Fri Feb-24-06 09:16 PM
Response to Original message
1. I certainly hope none of them want to attend State Universities & Colleges
Edited on Fri Feb-24-06 09:25 PM by CottonBear
'cause those are government schools too.

It's funny how the "gov't schools" complaints wane after the fundy spawn "graduate" from high school.

edit: No offense meant to liberal non-fundy homeschoolers.
Printer Friendly | Permalink |  | Top
 
Swamp Rat Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sat Feb-25-06 12:07 PM
Response to Reply #1
33. They won't get in, unless it is a crappy bible (FAKE) college.
I've known a few homeschoolers of both the fundy and non-fundy variety. To this date, only the liberal non-fundy homeschooler's children have gotten into college. One of my best friend's child is on a full scholarship, and on her way to med school and the two younger ones are about to enter college. The children of my fundy friends, who are homeschoolers, are total fuck-ups and out of control. Just my persoanal experience thus far.

Printer Friendly | Permalink |  | Top
 
gilpo Donating Member (601 posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sat Feb-25-06 08:14 PM
Response to Reply #33
56. Gotta love the Phelpsies!
Fuckers were in Minnesota this week... Words fail me, indescribable scum. Love the picture, Swamp Rat!
Printer Friendly | Permalink |  | Top
 
MnFats Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Fri Feb-24-06 09:17 PM
Response to Original message
2. oh...sh**. the country is being rent asunder as though we were
iraqi sunnis and shia....
Printer Friendly | Permalink |  | Top
 
mzteris Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Fri Feb-24-06 09:17 PM
Response to Original message
3. please re-read this sentence
***"While homeschooling in America is on the rise, private biblical homeschooling is actually facing possible extinction," said Lowers, ***

What that means is, there are plenty of *liberal* homeschoolers - quite a few who are active DU'ers! - so please, don't lump all hs'ers in the same basket.

There are some very good reasons to homeschool that have NOTHING to do with religion.



Printer Friendly | Permalink |  | Top
 
IndyOp Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Fri Feb-24-06 09:24 PM
Response to Reply #3
8. Their purpose of saying 'private biblical homeschooling facing extinction'
is just to make fundies feel attacked, persecuted once again. The numbers are still big, they aren't facing extinction.

Liberal homeschoolers --> :yourock:

If you can do it, especially if you have a supportive homeschooling community, that is wonderful.

Improving the public schools is still the long-term goal that will improve the lives of all of us -- your homeschooled kids have to live alongside the products of the public school system.
Printer Friendly | Permalink |  | Top
 
proud2BlibKansan Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Fri Feb-24-06 09:26 PM
Response to Reply #8
11. The vast majority of our kids are still being educated in public schools
That is reason enough, IMO, to work to make them better rather than abandon them.
Printer Friendly | Permalink |  | Top
 
flashdebadge Donating Member (235 posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Fri Feb-24-06 10:04 PM
Response to Reply #8
17. like it or not the public schools are not doing very well. European kids
as well as Asian kids are much smarter and score higher on aptitude tests. The reason I believe has to do with a lack of respect for the teachers. I'm appalled at what I've seen in the schools here. The kids run the classroom. My neighbors took their 2 kids out of public school because they just weren't doing well. I have noticed in just the last 6 months that the son's speech and his ability to express his self has improved dramatically. I don't know what curriculum they're using be it has definitely helped him. The father told us that his daughter has advanced two grade levels in that same time. That sounds a little much to me but she (the mother) can focus on two kids instead of 25.

Printer Friendly | Permalink |  | Top
 
proud2BlibKansan Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sat Feb-25-06 08:25 AM
Response to Reply #17
21. No, European and Asian kids are NOT doing any better
That is one of the biggest myths of our times. In Europe and Asia, they screen out the kids who are not considered college material and test only the higher level kids. But here in the USA, we test ALL of our kids. So you are comparing apples to oranges.
Printer Friendly | Permalink |  | Top
 
Lydia Leftcoast Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sat Feb-25-06 03:37 PM
Response to Reply #21
39. That's true at the secondary level, but not before
:shrug:
Printer Friendly | Permalink |  | Top
 
mzteris Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sat Feb-25-06 08:32 AM
Response to Reply #17
24. It doesn't sound like too much at all . . .
one-on-one learning is optimal. If they were behind in their classroom, she probably caught up and surpassed where they were. It's not uncommon at all.

Children learn in different ways, some in drastically different ways. And, unfortunately, PS is not designed to be able to accommodate those children. When you have large groups you have to "teach to the average kid" (who really doesn't exist!).

By focusing on each child's preferred learning style, bolstering and accommodating any learning differences or disabilities, and playing to a child's strength, rapid advancement is quite common. It's not unusual for hs'ers to be doing college level classes by the time they would normally be in highschool. (And not uncommon for even younger kids to be doing college level coursework, btw.)

As for the lack of respect for teachers, I think that also includes lack of respect for parents and adults in general, as well as themselves and each other. The environment in many schools is truly awful. And for some, that is reason enough to pull their kids.

Ideally, classrooms should have no more than 20 kids and have two certified teachers in every classroom. Individualized learning plans should be in place for EACH child and parental involvement strongly encouraged, if not required. NCLB should be tossed aside like the rag that it is. Rote memorization should go the way of the dinosaur. Memorize and regurgitate is NOT LEARNING! Teach children to think critically. Embrace their innate love of learning and encourage their natural curiosity. Stop trying to force each and every child to function "at grade level" for "all subjects" in any given year. It's unnatural and unrealistic.

I am not anti-PS. I have one still in PS - albeit a public charter Montessori program, which, btw, functions as much like what I've stated above as it can with NCLB in place. It IS doable. It just takes $$, commitment and drastically improved teacher training. (And maybe some parental training along the way. :) )

Printer Friendly | Permalink |  | Top
 
Mutley Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sat Feb-25-06 12:04 PM
Response to Reply #24
32. You're right.
Some of the stuff I do at college could be fairly easily learned by "the average" kid. Other stuff, not so much -- I have a hard time understanding some of it, and I'm no dummy. ;)
Printer Friendly | Permalink |  | Top
 
proud2BlibKansan Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sat Feb-25-06 03:06 PM
Response to Reply #24
38. The environment in my school is absolutely wonderful
We have won awards - and just found out this week we won another - for excellence in public education. In a low income area where 75% of our kids come to us as non English speakers we have proven that excellence is possible. We also make AYP every year and last year so did 93% of the elementary schools in the urban system where I work.

And you are as anti-PS as possible. Claiming you are not does not change the impression you give.

"The environment in many schools is truly awful." That is an anti school statement!

I am sorry the public schools where you live are so poor. But that is not true in many other communities. Your anti school talking points do nothing to help improve education.
Printer Friendly | Permalink |  | Top
 
mzteris Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sat Feb-25-06 04:54 PM
Response to Reply #38
45. How can you say this?
"And you are as anti-PS as possible. Claiming you are not does not change the impression you give. "

I HAVE a child in Public School. (Maybe you're the one not paying attention? lol)

I am wholeheartedly committed to the fact that this country NEEDS *good* public education! I just think PS needs drastic improvement overall (most schools) and that for SOME kids, HS is a better choice.

Isn't it about choice?

I don't need to beat the PS is essential drum, that's a given. But I do need to make sure that people understand that hs'ing is an excellent and viable choice for some.

Printer Friendly | Permalink |  | Top
 
mzteris Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sat Feb-25-06 05:11 PM
Response to Reply #38
47. my "anti school talking points?"
Edited on Sat Feb-25-06 05:13 PM by mzteris
I am NOT antischool dammnit!

And the public schools in this county are counted amongst the "best" - it just does NOT WORK for my ONE SON! My daughter graduated from PS and my other son is IN PS.

Do you claim that ps is perfect? That there is no room for improvement? Do you only want laudatory comments? Are you afraid of an honest critique?

If you don't know what's wrong, you can't fix it.

I am truly happy that your school is doing so well. I am especially happy that the ESL kids are thriving where you are (which is truly an exception, I believe, for MOST ESL kids in this country, n'est pas?)

You are so darned DEFENSIVE! I am NOT talking about YOU as a teacher. I am NOT talking about YOUR school. Are there good schools? Yes. Great schools even. Are they the rule or the exception, P2BL? Are there mediocre schools? Bad schools? Abysmal schools?

Why do you want to pretend everything is just hunky dory in PS land? Why are you so afraid when people talk about what is WRONG in PS? It's NOT YOUR FAULT, so why do you get so upset?

One last time - I am NOT anti-PS, I am, however, vocal about what is wrong. And I most assuredly am anti-NCLB. I thought you were, too.

edit: typo
Printer Friendly | Permalink |  | Top
 
proud2BlibKansan Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sat Feb-25-06 07:08 PM
Response to Reply #47
49. "The environment in many schools is truly awful."
Printer Friendly | Permalink |  | Top
 
mzteris Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sat Feb-25-06 08:07 PM
Response to Reply #49
53. Yes, it is.
I'm glad we finally agree on something!

:)
Printer Friendly | Permalink |  | Top
 
proud2BlibKansan Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sat Feb-25-06 09:38 PM
Response to Reply #53
57. I'm not smiling and I disagree strongly
Maybe in YOUR school district the schools are bad. Not in mine. And in the district where I live they are wonderful.
Printer Friendly | Permalink |  | Top
 
mzteris Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sat Feb-25-06 10:43 PM
Response to Reply #57
59. That's because you have no sense of humour......
:D

No, NOT in mine. And it is truly wonderful - not to mention phenomonal - that ALL the schools in your district are wonderful. I'm sure that is due to your presence! :)

However, you know as well as I - however much you doth protest - that not ALL schools in every district in every borough in every town in every state IS wonderful. And, in fact, some of them, many of them in fact, are downright abysmal.

Or do you insist that all schools everywhere are the places dreams are made of?

In your dreams . . .
Printer Friendly | Permalink |  | Top
 
mzteris Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sat Feb-25-06 05:14 PM
Response to Reply #38
48. Do you think THIS is
anti school for me to say?

"Ideally, classrooms should have no more than 20 kids and have two certified teachers in every classroom. Individualized learning plans should be in place for EACH child and parental involvement strongly encouraged, if not required. NCLB should be tossed aside like the rag that it is. Rote memorization should go the way of the dinosaur. Memorize and regurgitate is NOT LEARNING! Teach children to think critically. Embrace their innate love of learning and encourage their natural curiosity. Stop trying to force each and every child to function "at grade level" for "all subjects" in any given year. It's unnatural and unrealistic. "


Printer Friendly | Permalink |  | Top
 
proud2BlibKansan Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sat Feb-25-06 07:11 PM
Response to Reply #48
50. It's unrealistic
We abandoned rote memorization many years ago. Curriculum nationwide reflect the value of critical thinking and problem solving.

Two certified teachers in a classroom?? Where do you think the money for that will come from? LOL We can't get enough money to pay for programs we have NOW.
Printer Friendly | Permalink |  | Top
 
mzteris Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sat Feb-25-06 08:10 PM
Response to Reply #50
54. LOL???
I think :cry: is more in order, don't you?

I think the money should be there. More $$ to pay YOU more! To ensure every child has the supplies they need to learn. So teachers don't have to pay out-of-pocket to buy necessities for their classrooms.

Don't you agree that having two teachers to a 20 kid max room would be great????????

"curriculum nationwide reflect the value of critical thinking and problem solving" - - - Margaret, is that you??????

:rofl:

Printer Friendly | Permalink |  | Top
 
IndyOp Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sat Feb-25-06 04:42 PM
Response to Reply #24
42. You hit a sore spot with your 'memorize' comment --
In order to remember (memorize) advanced material, one must understand it.

As my college freshmen say: "You can't *just* memorize, you have to understand it."

However: Remembering and writing exact definitions is a necessary part of analytical thinking.

I've *way too freaking many* college students who cannot *even* state a definition and example of key terms. If they can't do that, then they certainly cannot come up with a complete novel example or compare/contrast how one concept is like/unlike another.

Memorization and understanding are two parts of an iterative process: I try to memorize the definition, then I have to compare the definition with the example to make sure I understand which parts of the definition are key, then I again try to memorize the definition making certain I have all the key parts. I compare this definition with that one to understand in more depth, then I do that memorization thing again. I come up with novel examples and go from there...

Rote memorization - memorizing word for word - *is* a part of understanding.

Memorization on a surface level -- remembering one key word from the definition -- if that is what you mean by 'rote' then you betcha -- teachers who leave students at that level should be re-trained or canned.

:grr:

Printer Friendly | Permalink |  | Top
 
mzteris Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sat Feb-25-06 05:01 PM
Response to Reply #42
46. I beg to disagree
**As my college freshmen say: "You can't *just* memorize, you have to understand it." **

I know many children who "memorize" the times table without the least understanding of multiplication. There are children who "memorize" many things without comprehending the meaning behind it.

Comprehension is much more important than memorization.

Have you ever heard of dyscalculia? These are children who canNOT memorize the times table, yet they are gifted at math concepts. (Possibly Einstein fit this description.) My son basically taught himself the concept of multiplication when he was 4 yo - yet, to this day (at 12), he cannot say his "times tables".


**Memorization on a surface level -- remembering one key word from the definition -- if that is what you mean by 'rote' then you betcha -- teachers who leave students at that level should be re-trained or canned.**

Even "memorizing the whole thing" can leave people without a true understanding of what that means.

For example: I could get my 7 yo to "memorize" all sorts of mathematic and/or physics equations. He could tell you them when asked, but would that mean he understood them or knew how to apply them? No.

What I'm talking about is this tendency to teach "facts" divorced from context. People think if their child can quote back Avogadro's Law that means they understand; it doesn't. What's more important, being able to comprehend a CONCEPT or repeat out a canned response that you have no idea of what it means?

Unfortunately, the "teach to the test" aspect of NCLB is forcing many teachers to teach in just this manner.
Printer Friendly | Permalink |  | Top
 
IndyOp Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sat Feb-25-06 07:38 PM
Response to Reply #46
51. If you memorize you don't necessarily comprehend.
If you comprehend you can remember the details clearly and express them in the original language and/or in your own words (you have memorized).

"Comprehension is much more important than memorization." <- They aren't mutually exclusive. One sometimes has to memorize some/most of the 'chunks' before they can comprehend the whole.

You have to 'memorize' the meanings of all of the Spanish words before you can understand and speak Spanish. And, of course, learning the meanings in context -- by listening, seeing, experiencing the language -- is an excellent way to memorize and comprehend.

As for the times tables: I teach statistics. Some students who understand the concept of multiplication, but who don't know the times tables - cannot catch themselves making simple mistakes. They multiply 11 x 11 on their calculator and when the screen reads 110 they write that down and then the rest of their computation goes astray.

Printer Friendly | Permalink |  | Top
 
mzteris Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sat Feb-25-06 08:06 PM
Response to Reply #51
52. some people are
global learners, instead, who go from *whole* to *part(s)*. They're conceptual learners who access the facts as they need them.

**One sometimes has to memorize some/most of the 'chunks' before they can comprehend the whole.**

People who learn a language aren't necessarily "memorizing". We, as adults, seem to *have* to do this, but you didn't "memorize" words when you learned English (or whatever your first language is) you just "learned the language".

Maybe we're just having a semantical disjunction?
Printer Friendly | Permalink |  | Top
 
Kerrytravelers Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sat Feb-25-06 11:58 AM
Response to Reply #17
30. The kids don't run my classroom.
I am in charge of my classroom. However, I will say that often there is that core group of parents who want to run it... especially if they think little Johnny or little Janie might actually have to DO something. I have been teaching less than 10 years and I'm throwing in the towel. After years of parents arguing and weak principals who cave in, Superintendents with a personal agenda... and the politics of it all, I simply can not get my job done- and I've never had a formal complaint lodged against me. I can't image how hard it is for the teachers who have a particularly vindictive parent (no, I'm not talking about the teachers who have done something worthy of being fired.) It's really sad. And believe me, I am not the only one. 85% of teachers quit within the first 5 years. That's a pretty bad track record.
Printer Friendly | Permalink |  | Top
 
bumblebee1 Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sat Feb-25-06 01:46 PM
Response to Reply #17
36. Also,
the PARENTS of the European and Asians expect more from their children as far as academics go.
Printer Friendly | Permalink |  | Top
 
Lydia Leftcoast Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sat Feb-25-06 03:40 PM
Response to Reply #36
40. That's absolutely true
And teaching is considered a prestigious occupation with salaries to match.

Public school teaching is the highest paying job a new college graduate in Japan can get.
Printer Friendly | Permalink |  | Top
 
phylny Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sat Feb-25-06 08:10 PM
Response to Reply #17
55. I disagree. I have three daughters, all attending public schools
(our oldest attended public schools and now is at a prestigious public university).

They've had terrific educations in four different districts - two in the midwest, one in the south, and one in the northeast.

Public education has helped my chidren to thrive.
Printer Friendly | Permalink |  | Top
 
mzteris Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sat Feb-25-06 08:19 AM
Response to Reply #8
19. I only hs one of my kids -
I graduated on from public school, and have one in 1st grade in a public charter magnet school.

I'm not anti-PS. I agree wholeheartedly that the PS system desperately needs improvement. It - as a whole - is damaged and getting worse by minute with NCLB. Society NEEDS an excellent education program.

Let's face it, PS does not work for every child in it's current format. For many, hs'ing offers a better environment for learning. For some, the schools available to them, are failing and they have no other options.

I just get really ticked when people say hs'ing is detrimental to a child's education and development when they know absolutely nothing about it and how it actually works. And I get REALLY upset when DU'ers lump all hs'ers in with the RW fundie nutjobs.


Thanks for not slamming us. :grouphug:
Printer Friendly | Permalink |  | Top
 
nolies32fouettes Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sat Feb-25-06 03:51 PM
Response to Reply #3
41. take a bow!
Printer Friendly | Permalink |  | Top
 
wakeme2008 Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Fri Feb-24-06 09:18 PM
Response to Original message
4. Great idea fundies....
Produce dumb adult workers and lets the states spend more per student on the ones in public schools. This is a win win for most public school students.
Printer Friendly | Permalink |  | Top
 
mzteris Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sat Feb-25-06 08:34 AM
Response to Reply #4
25. Unfortunately,
it's the current PS model that's producing "dumb adult workers".

Memorize and regurgitate. DON'T THINK! Just do what your told, don't think outside the box. Learn JUST THIS and NO MORE.

Public schools were DESIGNED to "train factory workers" when they became prevalent in the United States. Read a little about the history of the development of PS in the US. You might be surprised.

Printer Friendly | Permalink |  | Top
 
Kerrytravelers Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sat Feb-25-06 11:59 AM
Response to Reply #25
31. Well, not all public school teachers follow a narrow teaching method.
Let's not generalize.
Printer Friendly | Permalink |  | Top
 
mzteris Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sat Feb-25-06 12:20 PM
Response to Reply #31
34. did I say all?
And with the institution of NCLB, how much freedom to actually TEACH do teachers really have anymore?

Printer Friendly | Permalink |  | Top
 
Kerrytravelers Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sat Feb-25-06 01:08 PM
Response to Reply #34
35. It's tougher, but even within NCLB, there is some creativity.
But I certainly am no fan of NCLB by any means. While the orginaly concept of public schoos was to train factory workers, when I earned my credential, we had to take all these History of Education Classes and leanred that with the change of our country being a manufacturing economy, the goals of school also changed. Many schools today no longer use the bell system.
Printer Friendly | Permalink |  | Top
 
Kerrytravelers Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Fri Feb-24-06 09:21 PM
Response to Original message
5. The "hell" of government education. Let's ask WHO turned it into "hell."
How about those who decided to destroy the public education system... starting with reagan.
Printer Friendly | Permalink |  | Top
 
proud2BlibKansan Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sat Feb-25-06 08:30 AM
Response to Reply #5
22. And who is contributing to the talking points aimed at destroying
public schools?

It is so incredibly disheartening to see that right here on DU.

You are right. This crap started with reagan. And a BIG part of their agenda is to convince the general public that a problem exists where in actuality, our schools are getting better in many ways. But then, if people knew that, then there would be no need for vouchers (oops I mean 'opportunity scholarships').
Printer Friendly | Permalink |  | Top
 
IndyOp Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Fri Feb-24-06 09:21 PM
Response to Original message
6. Be afraid. Be very afraid. Pornography and abuse in preschool...
Even in Christian preschools, there are children who come from homes that have pornography present, that allow foul TV and movie programs to be seen, where abuse occurs, etc. You just do not know. Even cruel words or unjust behavior from a peer or preschool worker can cause lifelong damage to your children's view of learning and life.
Printer Friendly | Permalink |  | Top
 
mrcheerful Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Fri Feb-24-06 09:23 PM
Response to Original message
7. Whats 1+1 Johny, ahhhhhhh jebus didn't do math so I don't have to
either. Well Johny, what about dinosaurs? Those are just made up by heretics, theres no mention of them in the bible, so they don't exist. How about the constitution Johny? Whats the first amendment mean? I have the right to jam my beliefs down your throat and nobody can say anything about it because god is on my side. Morons can not teach kids to be anything except bigger morons. Hate starts in the home.
Printer Friendly | Permalink |  | Top
 
proud2BlibKansan Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Fri Feb-24-06 09:25 PM
Response to Original message
9. So children in public schools are in a hell ?
Wow I had no idea . . . :eyes: :crazy:
Printer Friendly | Permalink |  | Top
 
philarq Donating Member (273 posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Fri Feb-24-06 09:26 PM
Response to Original message
10. I certainly hope they keep home schooling their kids---
Easier jobs for smart kids graduating college---

I can see the hiring questions---Is the earth flat?
Printer Friendly | Permalink |  | Top
 
proud2BlibKansan Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Fri Feb-24-06 09:27 PM
Response to Reply #10
12. LOL
Explain the theory of gravity.
Printer Friendly | Permalink |  | Top
 
Dogmudgeon Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Fri Feb-24-06 09:46 PM
Response to Original message
13. From their "Statement Of Faith"
"We believe all believers in Jesus should live a life in accordance with the Bible, and which brings glory to God. We believe that homosexuality is an abomination to the Lord (Leviticus 18:22, Romans 1:26-27) and that a marriage between one man and one woman is the only place God permits a sexual relationship."

Homosexuality, marriage, sexual relationships ... that's a hell of a lot of pressure to put on a pre-teen child, don't you think?

--p!
"And let your breastplates be of Latex ..."
(2 Kings 15, NKVD)

Printer Friendly | Permalink |  | Top
 
momster Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Fri Feb-24-06 09:47 PM
Response to Original message
14. The REAL reason
the "Christian" establishment is pushing homeschool is less for the children's sake than to keep women at home (their 'proper sphere'). As a rule, it's not the dads staying home to teach their kids -- he's out doing the breadwinner thing. I remember when the Southern Baptists were going all-out for home schooling, wanting people to pledge that they'd take their kids out of the public system. I believe it's still in their charter because a friend of mine is S.B. Her reaction was 'heck no!' But if thousands of women gave up their jobs to stay home with the kids, wouldn't that just be fundie nirvana? There's an awful lot of people out there who think the world would be just jim-dandy if women were required to stay at home, schooling the kids and, as long as they've got 'nothing else to do', why not have supper on the table, house spotless, and another baby?
Printer Friendly | Permalink |  | Top
 
GreenPartyVoter Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Fri Feb-24-06 09:51 PM
Response to Original message
15. This might perk you up a bit *g*
Printer Friendly | Permalink |  | Top
 
no_hypocrisy Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Fri Feb-24-06 09:54 PM
Response to Original message
16. There IS an upside: deferment from NCLB & standardized testing for
a dozen years.
Printer Friendly | Permalink |  | Top
 
flashdebadge Donating Member (235 posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Fri Feb-24-06 10:08 PM
Response to Reply #16
18. No Child left behind is stupid and here's why...
take a kid who comes here from another country. They don't speak the english language. In some cases they don't speak their own language very well. Yet they are supposed to take a test after 6-9 months in the english language and pass! THAT'S CRAZY. And when enough of those kids fail it can cause the school to have a FAILING grade. Ludicrous! I do believe that the education system needs improving but I don't think that NCLB is the right plan.
Printer Friendly | Permalink |  | Top
 
proud2BlibKansan Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sat Feb-25-06 08:37 AM
Response to Reply #18
26. No they get a whole year
NCLB says they are tested after being here for a year, not just 6-9 months. But it still sucks. :)

In my state, we used to be able to wait two years to decide if they should participate in testing. If we thought their English skills were not good enough for the test, we could then wait another year before we tested them. So some ESL kids got three years before being tested. Not anymore, though. Now NCLB says one year, no more. We also can't read the tests to them anymore.
Printer Friendly | Permalink |  | Top
 
Maddy McCall Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sat Feb-25-06 08:25 AM
Response to Original message
20. I'm homeschooling to save mine from the hell of public education...
in Mississippi.
Printer Friendly | Permalink |  | Top
 
MadHound Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sat Feb-25-06 08:31 AM
Response to Original message
23. Does anybody know
If homeschoolers have to meet the mandated NCLB standards? I would be interested in knowing.
Printer Friendly | Permalink |  | Top
 
mzteris Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sat Feb-25-06 08:38 AM
Response to Reply #23
27. Private schools do not
Church schools do not.

In some states, hs'ers are considered "private schools". I don't know of any state where hs'ers have to meet NCLB "standards". In fact, NCLB is probably the reason you're seeing an increasing number of hs'ers of the non-fundie variety. PS sucks in many communities and people have figured out they can do a better job.

Hs'ers DO have to regularly test their children. Some states have very strict standards, some are quite liberal.


Printer Friendly | Permalink |  | Top
 
proud2BlibKansan Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sat Feb-25-06 08:43 AM
Response to Reply #23
28. No they don't
Regulations vary from state to state, but it is left up to each state to decide. So there is no national mandate. In the state where I teach, there is no mandated testing for homeschooled kids. I had one return to public school a couple years ago who was homeschooled while his parents were at work all day. He spent his days watching TV and playing video games. We knew it and there was nothing we could do about it. We just got to work overtime trying to bring him up to grade level when he returned to public school.

Some states do have a testing requirement. But in my state, the homeschoolers fight it every time the legislature brings it up. So far, they have won. (And their kids have lost, IMO.)
Printer Friendly | Permalink |  | Top
 
mzteris Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sat Feb-25-06 09:36 AM
Response to Reply #28
29. "testing ain't necessarily
all it's cracked up to be", ya know? And, there are other ways one can monitor a child's progress.

Also, even in states where testing is not "required", most hs'ers I've corresponded with DO test so they have a measure of their children's progress.

The reason hs'ers fight "gov't" testing? Well, how well do you like the NCLB standardized tests you're required to give? Would you avoid them if you could? Of course you would.

******

Kansas Homeschooling Regs: 72-1111
Chapter 72.--SCHOOLS

Article 11.--SCHOOL ATTENDANCE,CURRICULUM AND ACCREDITATION . . .

(3) at least 15 hours per week of classroom work under the supervision of an instructor shall be provided, at which time students shall be required to file written reports of the learning activities they have pursued since the time of the last class meeting, indicating the length of time spent on each one, and the instructor shall examine and evaluate such reports, approve plans for further learning activities, and provide necessary assignments and instruction;

(4) regular attendance reports shall be filed as required by law, and students shall be reported as absent for each school day on which they have not completed the prescribed minimum of five hours of learning activities;

(5) the instructor shall keep complete records concerning instruction provided, assignments made, and work pursued by the students, and these records shall be filed on the first day of each month with the state board of education and the board of education of the school district in which the child resides;

****

Missouri Hs'ing:

Sec. 167.031. School attendance compulsory, who may be excused-nonattendance, penalty-home school, definition, requirements-school year defined- daily log, defense to prosecution. . .

(2) As evidence that a child is receiving regular instruction, the parent shall:
(a) Maintain the following records:
a. A plan book, diary, or other written record indicating subjects taught and activities engaged in; and
b. A portfolio of samples of the child's academic work; and
c. A record of evaluations of the child's academic progress; or
d. Other written, or credible evidence equivalent to subparagraphs a., b. and c.; and
(b) Offer at least one thousand hours of instruction, at least six hundred hours of which will be in reading, language arts, mathematics, social studies and science or academic courses that are related to the aforementioned subject areas and consonant with the pupil's age and ability. At least four hundred of the six hundred hours shall occur at the regular home school location.


Printer Friendly | Permalink |  | Top
 
proud2BlibKansan Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sat Feb-25-06 02:55 PM
Response to Reply #29
37. We have had this discussion too many times
And you don't pay attention. I don't teach in Kansas.
Printer Friendly | Permalink |  | Top
 
mzteris Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sat Feb-25-06 04:51 PM
Response to Reply #37
44. That's why I included MO
you live in KS according to your profile, so I wasn't sure what you meant when you said "my state".

See? I DO pay attention. :)

Printer Friendly | Permalink |  | Top
 
Ksec Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sat Feb-25-06 04:46 PM
Response to Original message
43. this is a well funded right wing movement to destroy unions
and public education.

I believe they , if allowed, would end publicly funded education and have nothing but private schools/ That way they put profit in the mix, kill unions that dont support rethugs, and make education a thing only the elite can afford. The rest of the people would make for cheap labor to provide the rich.
Printer Friendly | Permalink |  | Top
 
kineneb Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sat Feb-25-06 10:37 PM
Response to Original message
58. won't save them from "hell" of workplace
those fundie homeschoolers are totally unprepared to function in the real workplace, never mind colleges. What social skills?
Printer Friendly | Permalink |  | Top
 
DU AdBot (1000+ posts) Click to send private message to this author Click to view 
this author's profile Click to add 
this author to your buddy list Click to add 
this author to your Ignore list Sun Nov 19th 2017, 02:00 AM
Response to Original message
Advertisements [?]
 Top

Home » Discuss » Archives » General Discussion (01/01/06 through 01/22/2007) Donate to DU

Powered by DCForum+ Version 1.1 Copyright 1997-2002 DCScripts.com
Software has been extensively modified by the DU administrators


Important Notices: By participating on this discussion board, visitors agree to abide by the rules outlined on our Rules page. Messages posted on the Democratic Underground Discussion Forums are the opinions of the individuals who post them, and do not necessarily represent the opinions of Democratic Underground, LLC.

Home  |  Discussion Forums  |  Journals |  Store  |  Donate

About DU  |  Contact Us  |  Privacy Policy

Got a message for Democratic Underground? Click here to send us a message.

© 2001 - 2011 Democratic Underground, LLC