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13 Tips for great photography in developing countries

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Richard D Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Fri Jun-12-09 12:23 PM
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13 Tips for great photography in developing countries
and some great shots:

After living a few times in Africa, and thousands of shots, Ive figured out some ways to capture some of what makes places like Senegal and Ethiopia spellbinding. Here are some of those techniques. If youre a Senegalese or Ethiopian, lucky you! You know already then that its much easier to do this than it is for us visitors. These tips are for us Toubabs and Fenenjis.

Ready?

1. GO!

Just go there. Try it. I realize you may have just bought a couch and cant really afford it. I know that all-expense paid, drink-filled trip to Mexico seems so much easier. But go somewhere interesting. Go somewhere that shakes you up a little. Skip Paris and London for Mongolia, Zambia or Nicaragua. Leaving your home culture does some amazing things. And results in some amazing photos.



2. Learn the Language and Smile

Learn 50 local words. 10 even. This shows you care about their culture (you do, dont you? Because if not, well then I take back what I said in No. 1!). The more you learn about the culture, the more you can understand what is happening around you. This will translate to better photography. People will also be more willing subjects when they like you. These are a few of many good reasons to learn how to introduce yourself in a local language, and smile as you do.




11 more:
http://www.cashewman.com/2009/06/13-tips-for-great-phot...
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Celebration Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Fri Jun-12-09 01:14 PM
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1. Awesome pictures, and good in THEORY
But I am not sending this article to my daughter.

One yellow fever vaccine and two bouts of malaria are about all I would care for her body to experience. She would probably disagree.

The joys of parenthood!
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Richard D Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Fri Jun-12-09 02:03 PM
Response to Reply #1
2. What's a little Malaria or Yellow Fever . . .
. . . if you get great shots? Or dysentery for that matter? Snake bites, spider bites, head hunters? Nothing should stand in the way of a good photo!
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BrightKnight Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Fri Jun-12-09 06:07 PM
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3. I have a problem with 95% of the developing world exotic other shots that I have seen.
The images usually look very bad through the eyes of the person being photographed. They are usually cheap shots exploiting difference. Most people just look through their cameras and don't actually see anything. There are a few Robert Frank type images but they are very rare.

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Celebration Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Fri Jun-12-09 07:27 PM
Response to Reply #3
4. I sort of have that same issue with the contest this month
Photographing a stranger--uh, not sure. I have an entry, but after I took it, well, I sort of lost my nerve. Generally I am one to allow people a whole lot of space (privacy).
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tekisui Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sat Jun-13-09 01:20 PM
Response to Reply #4
6. I hear what you are saying.
I have had scowls and even been asked to delete shots. What I found was talking to people, listening to their story and engaging them goes a long way. By the time I leave them, we know each others names, and they are comfortable with me pointing a camera their way.

Others I act too fast to get caught. The trouble with this method is about 30% of my desired subjects, though never aware, end up blurry.
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tekisui Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sat Jun-13-09 01:16 PM
Response to Reply #3
5. Robert Fank is one of my idols.
What he did was literally amazing. He took thousands of shots to get there.

I have found that many people are quite approachable and will allow for a photograph when treated with respect and dignity.
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