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Voters in VA, ME, MT, VT, and KS: You CAN'T VOTE in person if you wear ANY Obama gear!

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jenmito Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Tue Oct-14-08 02:12 PM
Original message
Voters in VA, ME, MT, VT, and KS: You CAN'T VOTE in person if you wear ANY Obama gear!
Edited on Tue Oct-14-08 02:15 PM by jenmito
RICHMOND, Va. (AP) - Virginia voters won't be allowed to wear clothing featuring John McCain or Barack Obama when they head to the polls on Nov. 4.

The State Board of Elections on Tuesday voted to ban clothing and hats as well as buttons and other paraphernalia that directly advocate the election or defeat of a specific candidate or issue.


The American Civil Liberties Union argued that the ban violates the First Amendment's right to free speech. The board, however, said it has to weigh that against the right to vote free of undue influence or the tension that candidate advocacy might create.

Efforts to enforce a similar ban are headed to court in Pennsylvania. At least four statesMaine, Montana, Vermont and Kansasprohibit wearing campaign buttons, stickers and badges inside polling places.

http://www.breitbart.com/article.php?id=D93QE8S00&show_...

And people are complaining about ACORN??? People NEED TO KNOW THIS! They'll be turned away from the polls if they don't follow this crazy rule! And Repubs. know Obama gear is MUCH more popular than McCain gear. :eyes:
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ingac70 Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Tue Oct-14-08 02:14 PM
Response to Original message
1. Tennessee doesn't allow it either. n/t
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WI_DEM Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Tue Oct-14-08 02:14 PM
Response to Original message
2. I have no problem with it as long as it's fairly enforced. I usually think it's tacky for people to
go to the polls advertising who they are voting for. Maybe I'm old fashioned?
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jenmito Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Tue Oct-14-08 02:17 PM
Response to Reply #2
6. I have a BIG problem with it. For someone to have to think about what they WEAR before voting
is a huge problem.
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RichGirl Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Tue Oct-14-08 02:58 PM
Response to Reply #6
35. Grow up...it's a law plain and simple.
Do you also have a problem with having to drive under 55 in and 55 MPH speed zone! You certainly can think...gee I'm going to vote today, I guess I won't wear that Obama t-shirt because all I'll do is hold up the voting process and HURT OBAMA'S CHANCES!! If you can't remember that, write yourself a note!

Do you want to stand behind someone wearing a t-shirt with Palin's face on it while you are trying to enjoy one of the happiest days of your life??? NOT ME!
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jenmito Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Tue Oct-14-08 03:05 PM
Response to Reply #35
40. Grow up? I already voted. I'm posting this to help other people who may not be
aware of this law, like first-time voters. Excuse me for trying to help. :eyes:
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Veruca Salt Donating Member (846 posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Tue Oct-14-08 05:35 PM
Response to Reply #35
71. "Do you want to stand behind someone wearing a t-shirt with Palin's face on it "
:puke: Oh man I just threw up a little in my mouth!

I honestly didn't think of this, and I would have said 'anyone should be able to wear whatever the hell they want within reason'. But you're 100% right - I do NOT want to stand behind someone wearing a t-shirt with Falin's face on it. It's my opinion that anything bearing her image is no longer within reason.
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bad_robbie Donating Member (93 posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Wed Oct-15-08 10:41 AM
Response to Reply #35
84. Grow . . . Up?
Yes. Of course. Law is law, and must, by definition always be right and just. Those who disobey the law are criminals, and those who would question or seek to change a law are just maladjusted child-persons. Tsk, tsk, Ghandi. Grow up, Rosa. I'm gonna stop this car right now, Tommy Jefferson!
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traveller Donating Member (118 posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Tue Oct-14-08 03:15 PM
Response to Reply #6
50. the huge problem is stiring shit on election day at the polls with
images--for either side.


Yes, think before you go to the polls.
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jenmito Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Tue Oct-14-08 03:18 PM
Response to Reply #50
51. For first time voters it's potentially a huge problem. Not everyone
Edited on Tue Oct-14-08 03:18 PM by jenmito
follows politics as closely as we do and they may not KNOW about it.
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gkhouston Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Tue Oct-14-08 04:01 PM
Response to Reply #51
63. If they don't follow politics closely, how likely are they to be sporting political gear? n/t
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jenmito Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Tue Oct-14-08 05:35 PM
Response to Reply #63
73. Very likely. Kids could just think it's "cool" to wear some sort of "rock the vote for Obama" shirt
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Hutzpa Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Tue Oct-14-08 02:15 PM
Response to Original message
3. THIS IS VERY IMPORTANT

keep it kicked....


:kick: :kick:
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Nite Owl Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Tue Oct-14-08 02:15 PM
Response to Original message
4. Think NY has a similar law too. n/t
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Jim Lane Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Tue Oct-14-08 03:52 PM
Response to Reply #4
57. Yes, New York technically bars such clothing but it's not enforced
At least, I've never seen it enforced.

You can't electioneer within a certain distance of the polling place (75 feet or some such). That means no leafletting, no wearing of candidate pins, no wearing clothing that promotes a candidate, etc. The police officer at the polling place will occasionally come out and chase away leafletters who've ventured too close to the door. I don't recall ever being hassled about a campaign button, though, even when I wore it right into the voting booth.

Some campaigns have wanted to be able to identify their pollwatchers, so they issue them neutral colored pins. If you see someone wearing a pin that has your candidate's designated color on it, with no lettering or image, then you know you've spotted a colleague. To the general public, though, it doesn't violate the prohibition on electioneering. It just looks like some weirdo wearing a blank pin.
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Captain Hilts Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Tue Oct-14-08 04:10 PM
Response to Reply #4
65. In Utica, they close the bars!!! nt
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jberryhill Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Tue Oct-14-08 02:16 PM
Response to Original message
5. True in a LOT of states

I don't see the point anyway.

Wearing campaign paraphernalia isn't going to make your vote count any "more". And people who are showing up to the poll probably have a pretty durn good idea form whom they came to vote.

In minor local races for those "dog catcher" type offices in some places, I can see the point, but not at the top of the ballot.
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ecstatic Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Tue Oct-14-08 02:17 PM
Response to Original message
7. and GA. allegedly nt
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yellowdogintexas Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Tue Oct-14-08 02:17 PM
Response to Original message
8. TEXAS TOO!!!! ANY POLITICAL GEAR WILL GET YOU TURNED AWAY.
The 100 foot rule is strictly enforced here
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jenmito Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Tue Oct-14-08 02:20 PM
Response to Reply #8
14. That's BULL! So if a kid just throws on an Obama t-shirt they can't vote?! What if some
people don't have any other shirts? I'm just sayin'.
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gkhouston Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Tue Oct-14-08 02:29 PM
Response to Reply #14
20. Then put your shirt on wrong side out. The 100 foot rule is nothing new in Texas
and I've seen Dems insist that other Dems follow it. Years ago, a friend of mine was clerking an election and made the precinct judge move her car outside the boundary because the car was pretty much held together by political bumperstickers. :-)
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yellowdogintexas Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Wed Oct-15-08 10:25 AM
Response to Reply #20
82. our electioneering groups are bringing XX and XXX large dark opaque T shirts
for folks to put on over their gear then return back to us after they vote. If it is chilly then button your jacket, take off your buttons, remove your ball cap, etc.

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ellacott Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Tue Oct-14-08 02:17 PM
Response to Original message
9. Ohio has the same law
I saw the signs at my polling place during the primary. They didn't have these rules in previous years.
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napi21 Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Tue Oct-14-08 02:18 PM
Response to Original message
10. That's been the regulation here in Ga. for quite a few years!
Signs are posted outside every polling place stating that if you don't remove any political stuff or cover it so no one else can see it, you will be removed from the premesis.

In 2004, while we were waiting in line to vote, they removed a couple who had a t-shirt on their 4 month old that had a Kerry ad on it. They first asked them to remove it and turn it inside out. When the couple refused, they were removed.
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mindfulNJ Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Tue Oct-14-08 02:18 PM
Response to Original message
11. maybe Dems
should post people outside of polling places to remind people...perhaps with a boxful of plain t-shirts for borrowing. :shrug:
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demo dutch Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Tue Oct-14-08 02:19 PM
Response to Original message
12. Best not to, who knows what happens to your vote if you do!
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jenmito Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Tue Oct-14-08 02:23 PM
Response to Reply #12
18. What about if you have an Obama bumper sticker on your wheelchair?
Like I do? (Luckily I voted absentee, but there could be others who go to vote in person).
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gkhouston Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Tue Oct-14-08 02:36 PM
Response to Reply #18
22. You could wrap a piece of paper or a kleenex over the sticker temporarily,
just as you could cover a shirt with a jacket.
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jenmito Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Tue Oct-14-08 02:38 PM
Response to Reply #22
23. Can't. It's on the back of my battery. Just like a bumper sticker on the back of a car.
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gkhouston Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Tue Oct-14-08 02:46 PM
Response to Reply #23
30. Then fold a sheet of newspaper or a voting guide over the battery, if there's
no tape available. :eyes:
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jenmito Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Tue Oct-14-08 02:52 PM
Response to Reply #30
32. I'm talking about people who have to vote in person but don't have anyone to HELP them with any
Edited on Tue Oct-14-08 02:53 PM by jenmito
stickers they may have. How many people would think to bring tape with them? If the person's like me, they won't even THINK about what they have on their wheelchairs when going out. :eyes: back atcha.
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yellowdogintexas Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Wed Oct-15-08 10:30 AM
Response to Reply #32
83. the Obama people are of course on top of this and will be prepared to assist
in whatever way they can.

In fact it was someone from the Obama team that first told me about this. Since I usually vote on the way to or from work, never a problem for me, so I had no reason to know.

I'm buying a bunch of dark, large T shirts from my brother in law's cheap store for handing out before people get inside the 100 foot mark. We will have someone to collect them back to be used again.

Every GOTV meeting has addressed this and asked for donations of T shirts.
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FLyellowdog Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Tue Oct-14-08 02:20 PM
Response to Original message
13. Great chance to help Obama.
Edited on Tue Oct-14-08 02:21 PM by FLyellowdog
Go to the polls with extra T-shirts, ponchos, etc. to loan to Obama supporters to wear while voting. The important thing is to try keep them from having to go home and change and then come back.

Remember, a lot will be first time voters and won't necessarily be aware of such things, even if publicized. They'll be so excited about voting that they think they're doing a good thing by wearing campaign items.
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jenmito Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Tue Oct-14-08 02:22 PM
Response to Reply #13
16. YES! That's a GREAT idea! I hope the Obama campaign has volunteers on the case!
That would be great!
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Beaverhausen Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Tue Oct-14-08 02:39 PM
Response to Reply #13
26. self-delete
Edited on Tue Oct-14-08 03:12 PM by Beaverhausen
spank me now
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jenmito Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Tue Oct-14-08 02:47 PM
Response to Reply #26
31. How's it a bad idea to provide people with shirts/ponchos/etc. to COVER their Obama shirts
that they may be wearing by accident?
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Beaverhausen Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Tue Oct-14-08 03:12 PM
Response to Reply #31
46. Oh shoot- I read that post wrong. sorry
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jenmito Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Tue Oct-14-08 03:15 PM
Response to Reply #46
49. No problem.
:hi:
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WolverineDG Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Tue Oct-14-08 02:21 PM
Response to Original message
15. VOTE NAKED!
how's that for a solution?

dg
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mopinko Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Tue Oct-14-08 02:22 PM
Response to Original message
17. yup. not happening in my polling place.
i am a judge, and i enforce the 100' rule completely.
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jenmito Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Tue Oct-14-08 02:25 PM
Response to Reply #17
19. It's a dumb rule...
IMO.
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mopinko Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Tue Oct-14-08 02:35 PM
Response to Reply #19
21. eh. kinda, but
i think that it helps to establish some decorum in the polling place, and i think that is important.
but yeah, my last aldermanic election was challenged, and about all they could find to complain about was signatures that they didn't think matched (my call. can't be challenged.) and buttons in the polling place. they quite rightly failed in court. but people continue to insist that the election was not legit. sigh.
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jenmito Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Tue Oct-14-08 02:44 PM
Response to Reply #21
29. I don't think there should be a dress code to vote. It just screams "voter suppression"
and it's just another way to STOP people from being able to vote.
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Jim Lane Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Tue Oct-14-08 03:57 PM
Response to Reply #29
60. There's a legitimate purpose
Barring electioneering within a certain distance of the polling place is a reasonable restriction on the time, place, or manner of speech, and therefore permissible under the First Amendment.

Yes, in some rare cases, it might have an unintended side effect of voter suppression. As voter suppression problems go, however, it's pretty minor.

I think these state rules date from a time when wearing a t-shirt to promote a candidate was more or less unheard of. That's why I say that any voter suppression is an unintended side effect.
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pimpbot Donating Member (770 posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Tue Oct-14-08 02:38 PM
Response to Original message
24. uh, how hard is it to goto the bathroom and flip your shirt inside out?
I dont see the point of wearing politcal gear to the polls anyways. Its already a mess for the volunteers working there, why make their jobs any harder.
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jenmito Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Tue Oct-14-08 02:57 PM
Response to Reply #24
33. I'm talking about people who are unaware of this law. If people have been waiting in line for a
long time and then it was their time to vote, who says there'd be a BATHROOM available for them to flip over their shirt in? Would they have to go to the back of the line? Would they just get thrown out and told not to come back (intimidation)?
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RichardRay Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Tue Oct-14-08 02:39 PM
Response to Original message
25. Oh for christ's sakes. This has been a rule at every polling place
in every election I've ever voted in since the 60's. I always wear a button or something right up to time to get into line, then I stick it in my pocket. When I get my 'I Voted' sticker I get the button back out and put the sticker on it.

There are lots of things to be unhappy about, but I can't see this as one to waste a lot of energy on.

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Lex Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Tue Oct-14-08 02:44 PM
Response to Reply #25
28. Actually the states are all a little different.
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jenmito Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Tue Oct-14-08 03:08 PM
Response to Reply #25
43. How many new voters do you think know about this? n/t
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Lex Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Tue Oct-14-08 02:43 PM
Response to Original message
27. Here's a good resource on all states rules:
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MaineDem Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Tue Oct-14-08 02:58 PM
Response to Original message
34. That's not true in Maine
Buttons up to 3" are specifically allowed.
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jenmito Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Tue Oct-14-08 03:00 PM
Response to Reply #34
36. Well, the article wasn't specific enough, I guess.
:shrug:
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MaineDem Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Tue Oct-14-08 03:04 PM
Response to Reply #36
39. Actually the article was wrong
It says "campaign buttons, stickers and badges" are prohibited in Maine and that's not true.

I don't think reporters do enough fact-checking.

I don't want people to be intimidated if they're wearing a button and get challenged.
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jenmito Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Tue Oct-14-08 03:06 PM
Response to Reply #39
42. Then the writer of the article needs to be informed of the mistake. n/t
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MaineDem Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Tue Oct-14-08 03:12 PM
Response to Reply #42
47. This isn't any criticism of you
Like I said, I'd hate for someone to go vote here in Maine and have someone tell her/him they have to take a button off. They don't.

This is important information and it's good you posted the article.
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jenmito Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Tue Oct-14-08 03:14 PM
Response to Reply #47
48. Thanks...
I am getting some criticism for posting the article, though. I'm glad you're glad I posted it. :hi:
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TornadoTN Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Tue Oct-14-08 03:00 PM
Response to Original message
37. Tennessee doesn't allow it either from either side of the aisle
I it's a weak and off-target regulation that really doesn't accomplish, well, anything.

As long as it's equally enforced, I can live with it.
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jenmito Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Tue Oct-14-08 03:03 PM
Response to Reply #37
38. "Equally enforced" still is a disadvantage to Obama since there are by far more
Obama stuff than McCain stuff that people wear.
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TornadoTN Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Tue Oct-14-08 03:20 PM
Response to Reply #38
52. Maybe so, but the place for politicking, implied or otherwise, isn't in the voting room
I'm all for making the polling stations "politics free zones" within so many feet or yards from the polling station. That's why I don't mind this - it keeps the bullshit out of the polling station and people can just vote their conscience and not be influenced by who is wearing what inside the room. I know that not many people are influenced by that kind of thing but it does happen. I'd just rather avoid it in that sphere to be quite honest.

Outside of the polling station, people can wear whatever they want! If this is going to be a problem, then we need poll watchers at the polls with an extra supply of tshirts, ponchos, or packing paper and tape!
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Lars39 Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Tue Oct-14-08 03:09 PM
Response to Reply #37
44. I'm kinda glad that it's not allowed...can you imagine the messages
some people would put on their shirts?! Keeps down fights at the polls. :D
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Zech Marquis The 2nd Donating Member (242 posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Tue Oct-14-08 03:05 PM
Response to Original message
41. we need to get the word out fast then
alot of people are bound to show up with Obama buttons, shirts, etc, and they will NOT be happy on Election Day morning :-(
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jenmito Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Tue Oct-14-08 03:09 PM
Response to Reply #41
45. Thank you. I'm only trying to HELP...
I'm getting some criticism for just pointing this out. :shrug:
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barbiegeek Donating Member (844 posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Tue Oct-14-08 03:23 PM
Response to Original message
53. Iowa has done this for 20 years
Campaign material can not come within 100 feet or yards (I forget) of a voting station or you will be removed or arrested. As far as I know, Iowa has always had this law.

You also don't have to answer exit poll questions either.
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jenmito Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Tue Oct-14-08 03:48 PM
Response to Reply #53
55. I hope all first-time voters are aware of this.
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goclark Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Tue Oct-14-08 03:43 PM
Response to Original message
54. I've been hearing that in CA too
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AZBlue Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Tue Oct-14-08 03:51 PM
Response to Original message
56. I'm pretty sure this goes for all states.
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northernlights Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Tue Oct-14-08 03:54 PM
Response to Original message
58. It's far more important to express your opinion in your VOTE
than in your clothes.

I have no problem with it. To be honest, in this redneck Maine village, I'd be afraid to wear an Obama pin or post an Obama sign. They'd probably burn down my house with my critters in it if I did.

After this election, those of you concerned about infringement on free speech can take it up.

First things first. GET OBAMA IN OFFICE -- BY AN EV AND POPULAR LANDSLIDE...AND BACKED BY AS MANY DEMS IN CONGRESS AS HUMANLY POSSIBLE!!!!!

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jenmito Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Tue Oct-14-08 05:31 PM
Response to Reply #58
69. My point is ONLY that there are probably many first-time voters who don't KNOW the rules and may
Edited on Tue Oct-14-08 05:32 PM by jenmito
happen to wear their Obama t-shirts not knowing they aren't ALLOWED to do so and still vote.
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foo_bar Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Tue Oct-14-08 05:38 PM
Response to Reply #69
74. maybe the best solution from a volunteer standpoint is to loan people ponchos
Edited on Tue Oct-14-08 05:41 PM by foo_bar
Voters wearing Obama swag could just put on the outerwear instead of changing. It's not much but there's nothing you can do about state laws 3 weeks away (on edit: unless you're the ACLU :).
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jenmito Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Tue Oct-14-08 05:53 PM
Response to Reply #74
77. I agree. I hope there are volunteers out in force to provide people wih "cover"...
Literally (as Joe Biden would say). :)
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Midlodemocrat Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Tue Oct-14-08 03:55 PM
Response to Original message
59. It's considered electioneering and has been the law here since I moved here.
No problem with it. I just wear a jacket over my shirt.

They more than likely WON'T be turned away here. THey have to put on a jacket or turn the shirt inside out.
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MadAnne Donating Member (208 posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Tue Oct-14-08 03:59 PM
Response to Original message
61. West Virginia also. n/t
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blue_onyx Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Tue Oct-14-08 03:59 PM
Response to Original message
62. The same is true for Michigan too
Our local news did a story about this. I didn't know this so I'm glad they mentioned it.
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Captain Hilts Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Tue Oct-14-08 04:10 PM
Response to Original message
64. I got collared in Maryland during the primaries. nt
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Sunnyshine Donating Member (698 posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Tue Oct-14-08 04:15 PM
Response to Original message
66. Ohio too. I think just about everywhere, as it can lead to fights in line/ polling stations, plus
it keeps voters free from parties/opinions encroaching on a neutral space.


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RayOfHope Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Tue Oct-14-08 05:05 PM
Response to Original message
67. Can't do it in Missouri either. Its considered electioneering. I have no problem with it. n/t
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NightWatcher Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Tue Oct-14-08 05:07 PM
Response to Original message
68. pull a "Superman" and change into your Obama Gear in the voting booth.
Pull the lever then bust out of the booth
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WinkyDink Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Tue Oct-14-08 05:34 PM
Response to Original message
70. It's pretty easy to REMOVE "campaign buttons, stickers and badges", so I wouldn't get too bothered.
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Left Is Write Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Tue Oct-14-08 05:35 PM
Response to Original message
72. It's not allowed in Idaho either. Best advice: If in doubt, don't wear anything partisan.
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jenmito Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Tue Oct-14-08 05:51 PM
Response to Reply #72
76. My problem is I doubt many first-time voters know enough to HAVE any doubt. That's
my worry!
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dana_b Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Tue Oct-14-08 05:38 PM
Response to Original message
75. I was told the same thing about my county in California
I'm working as a poll worker and we were told that the voters had to take off buttons, badges, turn their shirts inside out, etc. It's considered "electioneering".
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tigereye Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Tue Oct-14-08 05:55 PM
Response to Original message
78. that's so bizarre - since when does a t-shirt or button influence someone
in the polling line?

Hell, it's the folks hawking stuff right in front of the polling place that probably theoretically could have more effect....



If it is the case, folks can simply be directed to turn their shirt inside out or put on a jacket...
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jenmito Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Tue Oct-14-08 06:33 PM
Response to Reply #78
80. Exactly! I see it as a desperate attempt to suppress the vote.
I'd put money on it that this was a Repub. idea.
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Waiting For Everyman Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Tue Oct-14-08 06:08 PM
Response to Original message
79. What next? A blue shirt gets voters turned away? A car bumper sticker?
This is idiotic. It never was like this before. They're waaayyyy desperate.
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Alexander Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Tue Oct-14-08 06:35 PM
Response to Original message
81. That goes for Arizona as well!
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bad_robbie Donating Member (93 posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Wed Oct-15-08 10:47 AM
Response to Original message
85. I have never heard of this
And I live in Kansas. I've served as an election clerk. We knew that Kansas law didn't allow politicking in or around a polling place, but I'd never heard that clothes could be considered "politicking". Examples we heard about were demonstrations, signs, chants, accosting voters with questions or instructions -- that sort of thing.
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SmokingJacket Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Wed Oct-15-08 10:49 AM
Response to Original message
86. You're not allowed to campaign at the polls. I think it's fair.
In this case, making the polling place non-partisan trumps freedom of expression, imho.
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