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beachmom Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sun Jan-27-08 09:36 PM
Original message
Barack Obama taught Constitutional Law At Chicago Law School. Dkos diary by one of his students
http://www.dailykos.com/story/2007/12/20/12119/122

Professor Obama and Me

by Adam B

Thu Dec 20, 2007 at 11:48:20 AM PST

It was 1996, and there I was, in a seminar room with maybe fifteen students, not knowing that I was learning from the man who might be the next President of the United States.

...

Spring quarter of my second year, I took Voting Rights and Election Law as a seminar with Professor Obama. Now, lets be clear: in a school with a lot of Somebodies Richard Posner, Frank Easterbrook, Cass Sunstein and David Currie he was a relative nobody, and even compared with other younger faculty, it was Larry Lessig and Elena Kagan who had more of the hype. But Obama was teaching a course in a subject I wanted to study at a point when I realized that law school was too short to be spent in classes that felt obligatory and that made it an easy decision.

And he was ... different. For one thing, better dressed. Sleek sweaters and blazers as opposed to ill-fitting, coffee-stained suits with mismatched ties. But he was also less formal, more relaxed he never taught the class as though he knew the answers to all the questions he was posing and was just hiding the ball from us until we could find them. Confident, sure, but never cocky.

Whats more, he taught Voting Rights in a different way than others do. He didnt use a textbook, for starters, but rather had us each purchase an eight-inch high multilith of cases, law review articles and statutes that he had personally compiled. And they werent all the "big" cases either no, our class started by reviewing some early-19th century cases about the denial of the franchise, so that as the course moved forward we saw "voting rights" not as some static thing to be analyzed, but a constantly- and still-evolving process to be affected. Over the course of a few months, we studied changes in the franchise, changes in the rights of political parties, campaign finance law and redistricting, among other topics. We learned the law, but we also learned it on the level of real-world impact: based on a whites-only party primary, how many people would be denied a voice? What kind of policies would result from such a legislature?

(Mind you, he was running for the State Senate at the same time. Honestly, I had no idea. Law school is something of a cocoon, and he never brought his outside life into the classroom.)

Much in the Chicago tradition, he wanted all voices to be heard in the classroom, and when there a viewpoint that wasnt being expressed or students were too complacent in their liberal views, hed push the contrary view himself. These classes were conversations.

And the conversations extended outside the classroom. I spent plenty of time in Prof. Obamas office, talking to him about the paper I was working on. Just the two of us, one on one, with him always provoking me to think deeper, work harder ...

... and keep it real.
During my senior year of college, I had written a 100 page honors thesis on racial gerrymandering, mostly focused on the original understanding of what "representation" meant, arguing that to properly understand the Federalist Papers and John Stuart Mill meant that representatives had to each filter the views of their constituents, and that you couldnt have a process in which the legislature decided which groups were guaranteed seats in Congress, and so therefore, the whole process of guaranteeing "majority-minority districts" in contemporary America was wrong.

Prof. Obama taught me to think about it differently. He made me look at this as a real world issue, and not as a theoretical construct. And in that world, unless some voices are physically present, they wont be heard at all and in the real world, legislatures are drawing their own maps to accumulate power, largely for incumbents. In other words, dont just be principled when everyone else is being pragmatic fight for your principles with a pragmatic approach.

So, yes, I then spent 20+ pages demolishing what I spent a hundred building just two years before. Why? It reminds me of this courtroom scene between Denzel Washington and the trial judge in Philadelphia:

Judge Garrett: In this courtroom, Mr.Miller, justice is blind to matters of race, creed, color, religion, and sexual orientation.

Joe Miller: With all due respect, your honor, we don't live in this courtroom, do we?


Professor Barack Obama reminded me that whatever my beliefs were, Id have to find a way to implement them in the real world if I wanted to make change happen. Good lesson. Great professor.

Oh, and I only got a B on the paper.


There are some who choose to shoot down an extraordinary man like Barack Obama with small thinking and petty attacks. If they think their absurd and low slams are going to deter or distract either Obama or the supporters behind him, then they are gravely mistaken. Yes We Can.
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FrenchieCat Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sun Jan-27-08 09:39 PM
Response to Original message
1. Obama taught Voting Rights and Election Law
How cool is that?
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Tellurian Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sun Jan-27-08 10:17 PM
Response to Reply #1
19. But never attained a Professorship from acadamia..He was a "Senior Lecturer in Law."
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Hutzpa Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sun Jan-27-08 11:25 PM
Response to Reply #19
24. I knew you'll show up, can't help yourself huh pathetic n/t
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Tellurian Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Mon Jan-28-08 05:45 AM
Response to Reply #24
28. Some of us care about keeping the Lies straight, even if you do not.
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davsand Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Mon Jan-28-08 01:22 PM
Response to Reply #28
33. A "Professor" is the piano player in a whorehouse.
There ya go. Obama was probably never a "Professor."

------


He DID, however, teach con law at a Chicago law school for a while.


Satisfied?????


Is this the best Hil can muster? Jeesh.


Laura
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elleng Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Mon Jan-28-08 09:08 PM
Response to Reply #33
55. At 'A' Chicago law school?
The University of Chicago Law School is one of the very best in the country.
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davsand Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Mon Jan-28-08 09:45 PM
Response to Reply #55
62. You are correct about that. However you must not overstate anything.
Edited on Mon Jan-28-08 09:46 PM by davsand
We are working for absolute purity in communication in this thread. It could be that someone will take the opportunity to criticize Obama because YOU (one of his minions, I suppose...) think UC Law school is a very good one.

:evilgrin:

I'm pretty sure Obama never played piano in a whorehouse, but I suppose there will be people who will try to debate the veracity of that statement too...


Laura
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elleng Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Mon Jan-28-08 10:43 PM
Response to Reply #62
64. I don't overstate;
I choose my words very carefully. I am a lawyer, and its due to training and blood, I believe.

I am no one's minion. I've supported General Clark since 2003, and after he endorsed HRC I became a Biden fan.
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Bodhi BloodWave Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Mon Jan-28-08 02:56 AM
Response to Reply #19
27. Only because he didn't want to become one
Edited on Mon Jan-28-08 02:56 AM by Bodhi BloodWave
A Sun-Times review of student evaluations from Obama's 10 years of teaching part-time at the University of Chicago Law School shows that students almost always rated Obama as one of their top instructors -- except for one quarter in 1997.

"Those are tremendous ratings, especially for someone who had a day job," Professor Cass Sunstein said. "We wanted him to join the faculty full-time at various different junctures. That's not a trivial fact. . . . If we want to hire someone, the faculty has to think they're tremendous. But he liked political life."

-snip-

Some Obama critics say because he had the title of "senior lecturer" he should not call himself "professor." U. of C. professors said Obama -- who practiced civil rights law for a time and stopped teaching in 2003 -- could have joined their ranks whenever he wanted.

"He was not an ivory tower academic," said former student Kenworthey Bilz, who had him for the low-ranked 1997 Constitutional Law class. "The class was not his first love. He was basically in the trenches. These were real problems to him. That kind of on-the-street realism was really refreshing."

Its quite an interesting read this article: http://www.suntimes.com/news/politics/obama/701490,CST-...
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beachmom Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Mon Jan-28-08 07:36 AM
Response to Reply #27
29. Wow, thanks for posting. Fascinating article. n/t
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Bodhi BloodWave Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Mon Jan-28-08 12:59 PM
Response to Reply #29
32. Nevermind this, i posted a link to the same Diary as the OP, accursed tiredness n/t
Edited on Mon Jan-28-08 01:01 PM by Bodhi BloodWave
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spooky3 Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Mon Jan-28-08 03:23 PM
Response to Reply #27
35. Teaching is NOT how you become a professor at a top school
Most top schools do have full-time teaching adjunct faculty (as well as many part time adjuncts). They save money for the universities because they are much cheaper than tenure track and tenured faculty, whose job is primarily research-focused and who perform service.

You can be a superstar teacher but you will never get tenure or be considered a genuine professor without top tier publishing at a university like Chicago. His colleagues might have invited him to start on a tenure-track but he would not have been able to continue it without doing the rest of the job well.

None of this is to denigrate what might be an outstanding teaching performance or his choice that academia was not the place for him. However, it is not accurate to call him a "professor." It's like equating a studio musician with a musician who writes and performs his or her own work.
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Bodhi BloodWave Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Mon Jan-28-08 04:48 PM
Response to Reply #35
39. As the link i posted show tho
Edited on Mon Jan-28-08 04:50 PM by Bodhi BloodWave
He was asked a number of time to join full time and he turned the offer down each time, also it seems that most the professors at the college are of the view he could have joined at any time he wanted(my two bolded sections).

Also unless I'm wrong most who teach are called professors at that level of education more as a term of respect, And while I'll agree he is not a professor of law, i will say he was an law professor(which is two quite different things)
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spooky3 Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Mon Jan-28-08 06:44 PM
Response to Reply #39
41. (a) being invited to be a tenure track asst. prof.
means that you have to publish in good journals or perish at top schools. Many, if not most, assistant professors perish.
(b) where else in life do you get to claim a title of a job that you turned down? If you declined an opportunity to go to medical school, even if 100 schools were competing with financial aid offers, you can't claim to be a doctor or even a medical student.

He was never a professor, period. He was a Senior Lecturer, and sounds as if he was a damned good one as well. That title is perfectly respectable.

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Maat Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Mon Jan-28-08 04:39 PM
Response to Reply #19
37. Many, many GREAT instructors don't get professorships ...
particularly if they have a life outside of the law school.

That is not a negative in the least; what I look at is his level of knowledge in the subject, his ability to see both sides, his ability to make a cogent argument, and the respect level his students showed for him. Obama more than passes the muster here (signed, Maat, J.D.).

So, don't try and take us down that road, Tellurian.
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Leopolds Ghost Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Mon Jan-28-08 05:05 PM
Response to Reply #19
40. He was offered a tenured professorship at Chicago U
Edited on Mon Jan-28-08 05:07 PM by Leopolds Ghost
"He was offered a tenured professorship at Chicago U but decided to take a leave of absence to pursue another career path: The Presidency."

Of course you know how hard it is to become an actual "professor" in the ancient university awards system, where most classes are actually taught by non-tenured lay folk. But the Rovian approach is to count on the ignorance of your audience. Put it another way: could you get a lectureship at University of Chicago, even if you were a lawyer? That is the most prestigious law school in the nation, I think... you have to be editor of the Harvard Law Review (like Obama was) to even go higher than student faculty or staff instructor there.

I am not a huge Obama supporter but this attack gets my goat as it should for anyone who has a PhD in their family.

Most PhDs would DIE for the chance at a low-paid POST-DOC at University of Chicago.

J.R.R. Tolkien was a Lecturer in Anglo-Saxon (not a full Professor) at Oxford for years despite being the foremost authority in the subject.
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cgrindley Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Mon Jan-28-08 09:13 PM
Response to Reply #40
56. Bullshit: Tolkien held named chairs starting in 1925
He was beyond a full professor. He held two of the most important named chairs in English starting in 1925. These are sodding named chairs. Beyond a full professor.

Take it from someone who has a PhD from an ancient British university.
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RazBerryBeret Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Mon Jan-28-08 07:45 PM
Response to Reply #19
42. wow....
you know what? some of us LIKE to be happy, have some hope, hear uplifting accounts of people..We've waited SO long for a little hope, do you have to rip it out of our hands and stomp on it? All dems should be happy we have 3 great candidates that we should feel good about. Tearing other people down is NOT the only way to make yourself look better.
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Tellurian Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Mon Jan-28-08 08:03 PM
Response to Reply #42
44. Telling it the way it is representated by facts IS what the law is all about..
Edited on Mon Jan-28-08 08:04 PM by Tellurian
as spooky3 posts alluded to in posts #35 & #41.

No one is trying to burst anyone's bubble. Keeping the facts in focus are an attribute of reality.
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DesEtoiles Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Mon Jan-28-08 08:14 PM
Response to Reply #19
46. As a woman attorney who won't make partner because I have
other obligations in life - such as my kid - I find your statement highly offensive.

I'm not a real lawyer unless I'm a partner? I have nothing to contribute? How dare you judge my choices and call my career path worthless.
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Tellurian Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Mon Jan-28-08 08:41 PM
Response to Reply #46
49. As a lawyer, a basic tenant is the ability to distinguish apples from oranges..
Edited on Mon Jan-28-08 08:41 PM by Tellurian
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appal_jack Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Mon Jan-28-08 09:05 PM
Response to Reply #49
54. no, a basic 'tenant' is a simple renter
Tellurian, are you trying to state what the basic tenets of being a lawyer are? 'Cuz if you mixed-up 'tenet' with 'tenant,' in a court of law (or a lawschool faculty meeting for that matter), you would be laughed out of the room. A tenant rents space, a tenet is 'an opinion, doctrine, or principle held as being true by a person or especially by an organization,' according to freedictionary.com

Guess what, raining on our parade doesn't work so well if it's you that's all wet!

Distinguishing apples from oranges in this case would lead one to conclude that Obama has the right mix of background, organization, charisma, and a hopeful message to truly inspire people, while Hillary is left with her husband's coat-tails, gutter-politics, and a voice that sounds like nails raking down a chalkboard. And a few followers with poor comprehension of the English language, apparently.

-app
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Tellurian Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Mon Jan-28-08 09:29 PM
Response to Reply #54
60. Give it a rest!
and your cheesy response 'is what it is'! Cheesy!
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elleng Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Mon Jan-28-08 09:01 PM
Response to Reply #19
53. Its fairly likely
that he chose not to be on a permanent, academic track.
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cgrindley Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Mon Jan-28-08 09:16 PM
Response to Reply #19
57. Junior Lecturer, Senior Lecturer, Assistant, Associate, Full, Distinguished
Edited on Mon Jan-28-08 09:19 PM by cgrindley
it doesn't matter what the rank... the title one uses if one is a student is "professor". Higher ranking colleagues will most certainly call even an adjunct lecturer "professor" as professional courtesy.
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elleng Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Mon Jan-28-08 09:00 PM
Response to Reply #1
52. VERY
cool!
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NYCGirl Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sun Jan-27-08 09:40 PM
Response to Original message
2. And a big recommend! NT
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City Lights Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sun Jan-27-08 09:43 PM
Response to Original message
3. K&R eom
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Kittycat Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sun Jan-27-08 09:44 PM
Response to Original message
4. Yes. We. Can.
Thank you so much for sharing the article. I'm not a regular DK reader, I should probably make more time. Great insight on a remarkable man.
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sandnsea Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sun Jan-27-08 09:44 PM
Response to Original message
5. Excellent
Thanks for digging that up and bringing it over.
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depakid Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sun Jan-27-08 09:45 PM
Response to Original message
6. Sounds like a good professor
Some of us are fortunate enough to have had quite few like that. It ought to be the norm.

How that should insulate him from criticism, or make him "extraordinary" is, on the other hand- quite beyond me -and I suspect if one made those comments about X or Y candidate in general, it would be quite beyond Professor Obama too.
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H2O Man Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sun Jan-27-08 09:45 PM
Response to Original message
7. Right.
Do not take anyone trying to peddle that other bullshit seriously.
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Marie26 Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sun Jan-27-08 09:48 PM
Response to Original message
8. That's not con. law.
Voting Right & election law is - election law. There's some overlap, though, so it might be a close enough description... but it would probably be more accurate to say that he taught a seminar about election law. That wouldn't cover the same stuff as a class in constitutional law.
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Adelante Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sun Jan-27-08 09:57 PM
Response to Reply #8
11. He also taught constitutional law
Obama then spent several years focusing on the law, both as an attorney at a small firm specializing in civil rights and as a lecturer on constitutional law at the University of Chicago.


http://www.cbsnews.com/stories/2008/01/16/politics/main...


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Marie26 Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sun Jan-27-08 10:13 PM
Response to Reply #11
17. OK
That wasn't in the OP, which seemed to say that Election law = Con law. I looked up the classes he taught:

# Constitutional Law III: Equal Protection and Substantive Due Process
# Current Issues in Racism & the Law
# Voting Rights & the Democratic Proces

He did teach an advanced con law class that focused on equal protection, along w/a class on racism & voting rights. Election law was his focus, which makes sense given his work for the Illinois Project Vote. Obama worked for a civil-rights firm/Project Vote during his time as a U of Chicago lecturer, so he definitely wasn't an adjunct professor.

http://www.law.uchicago.edu/faculty/obama/courses.html
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beachmom Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sun Jan-27-08 10:17 PM
Response to Reply #17
20. Sorry. My title was a response to another thread which, well,
needed to be responded to, so I was trying to keep it consistent with that. You're right that Adam B didn't take the Con Law class, but that he did teach that class.
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Marie26 Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sun Jan-27-08 10:24 PM
Response to Reply #20
21. It's an interesting post
Sounds like his students really loved him!
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Leopolds Ghost Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Mon Jan-28-08 07:58 PM
Response to Reply #17
43. He was offered an adjunct professorship but chose to become State Senator instead.
There are few who do both professorship and state legislature at the same
time, my State Senator (respected constitutional law prof) is among them.
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Marie26 Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Mon Jan-28-08 09:47 PM
Response to Reply #43
63. Link?
I wasn't aware that he was offered a job as professor; it would surprise me if he was, since he didn't have any academic publications. But whatever, this is hardly a major issue in the campaign.
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aein Donating Member (262 posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sun Jan-27-08 09:59 PM
Response to Reply #8
12. Profs. in law school teach different classes.
He taught first year con law as well.
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Occam Bandage Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sun Jan-27-08 10:08 PM
Response to Reply #8
14. That isn't con law, no. He taught more than one class.
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Jane Austin Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sun Jan-27-08 09:50 PM
Response to Original message
9. Very interesting.
Thanks.
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AtomicKitten Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sun Jan-27-08 09:54 PM
Response to Original message
10. Obama is extraordinarily gifted with a diverse background.
Thanks for posting this.
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Frances Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sun Jan-27-08 10:07 PM
Response to Original message
13. I REALLY appreciate articles like this
I haven't made up my mind yet. Honestly, some of Obama's supporters are so obnoxious that I was getting turned off to him. But this article was a very positive view of the man, and I like that.
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tammywammy Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sun Jan-27-08 10:09 PM
Response to Reply #13
15. Don't let supporters sway you
All the candidates have obnoxious supporters on here.
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beachmom Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sun Jan-27-08 10:15 PM
Response to Reply #13
18. Well, that's unfortunate. Thanks for your feedback. I'll try to post
things that provide great info like this more often.
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Avalux Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sun Jan-27-08 10:13 PM
Response to Original message
16. Wonderful. Obama is certainly extraordinary.
Those who choose to discount him and claim he is nothing more than a vacant head are, IMHO, either scared or envious.
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jaysunb Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sun Jan-27-08 10:27 PM
Response to Original message
22. Thanks, I was looking for this diary
to respond to the troll's post.
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Hutzpa Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sun Jan-27-08 10:55 PM
Response to Original message
23. Beach you are it......
Ok mom! we're not worthy,

thanks for the eye opener

once in awhile its needed, (nitro)


----PEACE!!


:thumbsup: :kick:


:loveya:
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silverweb Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Mon Jan-28-08 01:35 AM
Response to Original message
25. Great piece.
"Professor Barack Obama reminded me that whatever my beliefs were, Id have to find a way to implement them in the real world if I wanted to make change happen. Good lesson. Great professor."

And President Barack Obama will find a way help us restore our dearest-held democratic ideals to muddied and damaged real-world America. He'll be a great president.

:patriot:

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ellisonz Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Mon Jan-28-08 02:23 AM
Response to Original message
26. Sounds like an excellent teacher.
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meow mix Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Mon Jan-28-08 09:31 AM
Response to Original message
30. nice
i like his background its appealing to me
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pberq Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Mon Jan-28-08 11:59 AM
Response to Original message
31. thanks for posting this
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1776Forever Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Mon Jan-28-08 02:13 PM
Response to Original message
34. And Walton called Hillary "my little lady" as a contrast - For me my vote goes to Obama! Yes We Can
Yes We Can!!!!!!

Thank you for your post - It didn't really surprise me and helped to solidify my belief in Barack even more!
:applause: :woohoo: :applause:
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Medusa Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Mon Jan-28-08 03:45 PM
Response to Original message
36. In debates, interviews, q&a's with the public
I keep noticing something time and time again. He really seems to pause, reflect, take time to consider the question and then answers. There is no automaton response, no canned talking point that spurts out. Imagine that-a real, authentic person, not someone who bends themself whichever way the focus groups and polls show they should.
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grantcart Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Mon Jan-28-08 04:47 PM
Response to Original message
38. its too bad he doesn't have relevent experience on
the real meaning of government etc :sarcasm:
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bagimin Donating Member (945 posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Mon Jan-28-08 08:13 PM
Response to Original message
45. excellent insight..
thank you so much.
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Turner Ashby Donating Member (140 posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Mon Jan-28-08 08:25 PM
Response to Reply #45
47. Thanks to those of you who said that class wasn't con law,
I was beginning to think that I had forgotten an entire year of Law School.

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kirby Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Mon Jan-28-08 08:39 PM
Response to Original message
48. Can you imagine...
Bush teaching a class, or Romney.

Nice diary article. Thanks for posting.
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ErnestoG Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Mon Jan-28-08 08:42 PM
Response to Original message
50. Now they'll come back with "define professor!"
Amazing isn't it. The fact that so many of the old guard detest this guy means that he is the right choice.
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indimuse Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Mon Jan-28-08 08:58 PM
Response to Reply #50
51. 4 s fun...wiki...
United States
The term "professors" in the United States refers to a group of educators at the tertiary level. In colloquial language, usage of the term may refer to any educator at the post-secondary level, yet a considerable percentage of post-secondary educators are hired as lecturers or instructors, not as professors. Additionally, the post-secondary teacher classifications includes teaching assistants who are most commonly graduate students.<2> In the U.S., professors commonly occupy the ranks of assistant professor, associate professor or full professor. Research and education are among the main tasks of professors with the time spent in research or teaching depending strongly on the type of institution. The publication of articles in conferences, journals, and books are essential to occupational advancement.<2> As of August 2007 teaching in tertiary educational institutions is one of the fastest growing occupation, topping the U.S. Department of Labor's list of "above average wages and high projected growth occupations," with a projected increase of 524,000 positions between 2004 and 2014.<3>

Demographically, most professors in the U.S. are male, liberal<4><5>, upper middle class<6>, and among the top 15% of wage earners. The profession has been continuously rated as one of the most admired in the country.<7>According to a study by Robert Lichter, a professor at George Mason University, "The vast majority of professors in the United States identify themselves as liberal, and registered Democrats commonly outnumber registered Republicans." <4> Despite the liberal leaning of most professors, political scientist Brett O'Bannon of DePauw University has pointed out that the liberal opinions of professors seem to have little if any effect on the political orientation of students.<8> In terms of education, the vast majority hold Doctorate degrees. Professors at community colleges may only have a Master's degree while those at four year institutions are commonly required to hold a doctorate degree.<2>
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Corkey Mineola Donating Member (264 posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Mon Jan-28-08 09:22 PM
Response to Original message
58. i want to read obama's books but don't want to pay for them....
any online sources?
If I want to donate to his campaign I'll do that separately
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Canuckistanian Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Mon Jan-28-08 09:25 PM
Response to Original message
59. Constitutional Law? What dat?
Good to see a candidate who's not only mouthing praises to democracy, but seems to understand it deeply.

That said, I'd still like to see Edwards in the big chair.
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autorank Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Mon Jan-28-08 09:33 PM
Response to Original message
61. "he wanted all voices to be heard" - In his philosophy, here's my voice.
Edited on Mon Jan-28-08 09:34 PM by autorank
1) An initial foreign policy speech about pursuing our enemies from Afghanistan into Pakistan was both
reckless and naive. I didn't understand it until I saw that Zbig Brzezinski was his foreign policy
advisory. That's' Zbig of the Afghan resistance movement, of the Taliban, of the blow back that
brought us 911. Is this what we want? More cowboy diplomacy.

2) Why doesn't he talk about the figures on my sig line? Why doesn't anybody? Because that means
every Member of Congress who voted funding for the war is guilty for supporting those outcomes, crimes.

Why doesn't any candidate address that?

2) In his Iowa victory speech he talked about leaving our children a world "a little safer and
cleaner." A little cleaner won't work. We'll all be dead. How can the next president be this far
off on the environment.

Nobody is nominated, the vetting has just begun. Stop trying to kill the debate, something your
candidate would oppose form the article quoted.
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