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Hugo Chavez, fasten your seatbelt!

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reprehensor Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sat Mar-26-05 12:14 PM
Original message
Hugo Chavez, fasten your seatbelt!
The Nature of CIA Intervention in Venezuela

Philip Agee is a former CIA operative who left the agency in 1967 after becoming disillusioned by the CIA’s support for the status quo in the region. Says Agee, “I began to realize that what I and my colleagues had been doing in Latin America in the CIA was no more than a continuation of nearly five-hundred years of this, exploitation and genocide and so forth. And I began to think about what, until then would have been unthinkable, which was to write a book on how it all works.” The book, Inside the Company: CIA Diary, was an instant best-seller and was eventually published in over thirty languages. In 1978, three years after the publication of CIA Diary, Agee and a group of like-minded journalists began publishing the Covert Operations Information Bulletin (now Covert Action Quarterly), as part of a strategy of “guerilla journalism” aimed at destabilizing the CIA and exposing their operations.

Not surprisingly, the response of the US government and the CIA in particular to Agee’s work has been somewhat aggressive, and he has been forced to divide his time since the 1970s between Germany and Cuba. He currently represents a Canadian petroleum technology firm in Latin America.

Despite the recent rash of anti-Chávez editorials in the US media, and threatening statements made by a whole slew of senior US government officials at both the Departments of State and Defense, Agee sees a more cynical US strategy in Venezuela. Building on the work of scholar William I. Robinson on US intervention in Nicaragua throughout the 1980s, and recently published documents detailing CIA and US government activity in Venezuela, Agee suggests that the CIA’s strategy of “democracy promotion” is in full-force in Venezuela.

As with Nicaragua in the 1980s, a series of foundations are providing millions of dollars of funding to opposition forces in Venezuela, meted out by a private consulting firm contracted by the United States Agency for International Development (USAID). Assistant Secretary of State, Bureau of Western Hemisphere Affairs Roger Noriega recently reaffirmed the State Departments commitment to this strategy, telling the Senate Foreign Relations Committee on March 2nd, 2005, “we will support democratic elements in Venezuela so that they can continue to maintain the political space to which they are entitled.” The funding of these “democratic elements” has as its ultimate goal the unification of Venezuela’s splintered opposition (formerly loosely grouped into the Coordinadora Democratica) for the upcoming Presidential elections in 2006. But failing a victory in 2006, cautions Agee, the CIA et al. will remain, their eyes set on the 2012 elections, and the 2018 elections, ad infinitum, “because what’s at stake is the stability of the political system in the United States, and the security of the political class in the United States.”


Continued at link, very enlightening interview...
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Robbien Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sat Mar-26-05 12:21 PM
Response to Original message
1. The US funds the covert activities and when
Venezuela (or Cuba) captures and jails those covert agents, the Human Rights groups condemn Venezuela (or Cuba). What an upside down world we live in.
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K-W Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sat Mar-26-05 12:33 PM
Response to Reply #1
2. They condemn the US too, our media just doesnt cover it.
And the pols write them off as liberals with an agenda.
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reprehensor Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sat Mar-26-05 12:39 PM
Response to Reply #1
3. Robbie, if this topic interests you...
google 'Ralph McGehee' lots of info there.

Like Agee, he quit the company, spoke out and is now in hiding.

Here is a good start.
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Robbien Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sat Mar-26-05 01:32 PM
Response to Reply #3
5. Thanks for the link
Am listening to ThisIsHell right now but when the program is over I will be investigating that interesting-looking article and site.

No wonder our news media has very little on international news, it is becoming evident we would be shown to be the villains in many of the stories.
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nickgutierrez Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sat Mar-26-05 12:39 PM
Response to Original message
4. Barring a military invasion, Chavez will be fine
He has already survived one coup attempt, and I have to believe he can survive several more.
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Robbien Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sat Mar-26-05 01:38 PM
Response to Reply #4
6. From your mouth to god's ear
But I am not as optimistic because we seem to be relentless in our aggression in South and Central America. Poor Cuba has been fighting this type of covert aggression for over forty years and it just devastates their quality of life.
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htuttle Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sat Mar-26-05 01:53 PM
Response to Reply #6
7. They can kill Chavez, but they can't kill his revolution
If Chavez were assassinated, the people of Venezuela would never submit to a US puppet anymore. Chavez's advances for his constituency have been very real -- they aren't just going to give those up. They would elect someone else from the Bolivarian movement in his stead. If history is any judge, Chavez would look like a moderate compared to who would come after.

I doubt a replacement for an assassinated Chavez would be so nice to the opposition (and their television networks), for example. I think the opposition leaders would just get bullets in the brain next time. Short of talking Uribe in Columbia into stirring something up that the US could get involved in (a very unwise -- and materially impossible -- move at this point), Bush would see a situation he doesn't like get even worse for him.

Then again, making things 'worse' is what he excels at...
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Elidor Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sat Mar-26-05 03:14 PM
Response to Original message
8. Here's the site for Covert Action Quarterly, if anyone is interested
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Selatius Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sat Mar-26-05 03:28 PM
Response to Original message
9. Chavez needs to start a national militia system very much like the Swiss
Edited on Sat Mar-26-05 03:29 PM by Selatius
He needs to ensure that the people will not be slaughtered wholesale or "disappeared" in the event someone tries to kill Chavez, remove the government, and liquidate all opposition groups like what happened in Chile. The militias should be under the control and regulation of their respective communities, populated by members of those communities, and completely autonomous in case communications with the capital are cut off.
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