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The danger of legalizing Israel as a state of Jews

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bemildred Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Mon Nov-07-11 03:53 PM
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The danger of legalizing Israel as a state of Jews
On Sunday, Knesset legal adviser Eyal Yinon made it clear to Knesset Speaker Reuven Rivlin and his deputy, MK Mohammed Barakeh, that there were no grounds for blocking a bill entitled "Basic Law: Israel - the Nation-State of the Jewish People" from being submitted to the Knesset. Rather, he said, there should be both a public and parliamentary debate on the bill because of the broad implications it had for Israel's constitutional status.

In response, Rivlin announced that he would not conduct any further debate on the issue in the Knesset Presidium, claiming that the bill does not contravene the essential definition of Israel as a democratic country. He did, however, express his objections to the bill, which states that Israel's democratic regime would be subordinate to the state's Jewish identity, and which drops Arabic as an official language.

Both Jewish and Arab MKs from the left-wing parties, as well as other public figures, have expressed deep concern about the bill, sponsored by MK Avi Dichter (Kadima ), which, in practice, does away with the State of Israel's constitutional foundation. They argue, justifiably, that the bill contravenes the Declaration of Independence and its principles, and threatens the delicate balance between the state's national identity and its democratic and civil character.

The bill is making MKs in Dichter's own faction uncomfortable, with party chairman Tzipi Livni expressing her vehement opposition to it. Several Likud lawmakers and government ministers are also upset by the initiative, and certainly by the bill's wording.

http://www.haaretz.com/print-edition/opinion/the-danger-of-legalizing-israel-as-a-state-of-jews-1.394115
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aquart Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Mon Nov-07-11 04:07 PM
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1. Uh, WHICH Jewish identity would that be?
Orthodox, Conservative, Reform, or Cult of Personality? Among others.
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bemildred Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Mon Nov-07-11 04:15 PM
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2. The argument made seemed a bit nebulous to me.
But I more or less agree that further polarization of Israeli politics will not be good, and I don't see how this law will not have that effect.
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azurnoir Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Mon Nov-07-11 05:27 PM
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3. It will be interesting to see how this comes out
and just a few years ago such a thing would have been unthinkable but here we are
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bemildred Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Mon Nov-07-11 07:17 PM
Response to Reply #3
4. I was thinking about "how far we have come" in the last ten years today.
And this from the BBC piece:

Fast-forward

Indeed, far from the image of an Israel mired in unchanging politics and stagnant diplomacy, the country feels as if it is living its life on fast-forward. Quite apart from the revolutions on its borders, and the unfinished business of the occupation, its own population is transforming.

According to the official Bureau of Statistics, next year, 47.5% of children entering school will be either haredi (ultra-orthodox) or Arab (or Palestinian with Israeli citizenship, as they increasingly prefer to be called).

Both groups, by and large, see themselves as tribes apart from the broad Israeli mainstream. The haredim have traditionally not been part of the tax-paying economy, and have not served in the army - the men spending their time in study of the torah. The Palestinians with Israeli citizenship (22% of the Israeli population, and growing) have long felt disenfranchised and discriminated against in politics, jobs, and housing.

Where there is more consensus, among Israel's many groups and tribes and factions, is that another major flare-up may be just around the corner. They do not want it, but it is coming.


I don't really want to comment about what it means, I am no Nostradamus, but we don't seem to be moving in the direction of getting along better, and I do quite agree that change is coming, change is happening.
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shaayecanaan Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Mon Nov-07-11 10:51 PM
Response to Reply #4
6. Add to that about 15% of the population are Russians
who tend to be poor and relatively less educated. 59% of Russian Israelis are not considered Jewish and face severe impediments to marriage, unless they marry another Russian. As such assimilation prospects for these people are quite low.

Within a generation, two-thirds of Israel will be either Russian, Haredi or Arab.
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azurnoir Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Tue Nov-08-11 12:15 AM
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7. well the times they are a changin' n/t
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bemildred Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Mon Nov-07-11 07:35 PM
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5. And another interesting indicator of change:
In fundraising, Israel is a hard sell

It is getting increasingly difficult to persuade donors, especially younger ones, to give money for Israel this was the main conclusion one could draw from a series of round tables held this morning at the GA in Denver.

If youre over 50 you talk about the Six Day War, the creation of Israel and the saving of Ethiopian Jews, but if youre under 50 you have no idea what were talking about, said a representative of a Midwest community federation.

---

Two more interesting points that were raised: one representative of a West Coast Federation said that many of the heavy donors in the community were more interested in participating in the political arena, and are therefore directing their contributions towards the pro-Israel lobby AIPAC, than in safeguarding Jewish identity, and thus giving their money to the Federations.

Another Federation representative said that there is increased pressure to provide money for the needy in the local community, even if these are not Jewish, especially in these tough economic times.

http://www.haaretz.com/ga/in-fundraising-israel-is-a-hard-sell-1.394069
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azurnoir Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Tue Nov-08-11 12:22 AM
Response to Reply #5
8.  Personally I don't know of many 'young people' with a whole lot of money to 'give'-anyone
however this from the article gives a bit of clarity

There is a general unease about giving to Israel, because its hard to tell what its needs are these days, said one. The younger donors dont understand why we need to be giving to Israel, which has its own rich people and which is described, after all, as having one of the healthiest economies in the world, said another.
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