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Dover Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Tue May-20-08 03:41 AM
Original message
Growing UP - Vertical Gardening, Roof Gardens and Veggie Walls
Edited on Tue May-20-08 04:15 AM by Dover
There's an 'upward' trend in vertical gardening of all kinds. Or maybe it's as old as Babylon.
Food for thought and inspiration.

Here are articles on the various vertical styles:


Growing a Vertical Vegetable Garden

Do you live in the city? Are you confined to an apartment dwelling with little space for gardening? Do you want to grow a vegetable garden, but feel you dont have the room? If so, then I have news for you. While limited spaces of a city life can be frustrating for the urban gardener, growing a vegetable garden is anything but impossible. In fact, with a little planning and imagination, vegetable gardens can be grown anywhere, regardless of space.

How? Consider growing a vertical vegetable garden. You can easily produce the same amount of fresh vegetables without taking up excess space. A vertical vegetable garden is easy to create. You can create one using shelves, hanging baskets, or trellises...cont'd

http://www.gardeningknowhow.com/herb/growing-a-vertical-vegetable-garden.htm


Vertical Gardening (from Texas Gardener)

Texas is the land of wide-open spaces where huge ranches and farms are commonplace. However, despite the magnitude of our sprawling state, many gardeners lack suitable spots for a vegetable garden. Perhaps they live in an apartment or townhouse, or a very small lot where space is limited. Maybe theirs is an older neighborhood where towering shade trees leave little space with good sun exposure.

If you are one of those complaining about a lack of space I have two words of advice for you: "Grow Up!" I mean it. Forget the sprawling gardens where melons and vining squashes take over a land area equivalent to one of those scrawny New England states. Turn that garden on end and go vertical. We can get more into a small space by taking the garden to a higher level.

Other Advantages
Vertical gardening has other advantages, too. It is easier on the back and can make gardening more accessible for gardeners with physical disabilities. Fruit and foliage diseases are often reduced when vegetables are grown vertically. Air circulation is increased so fruit and foliage dry off faster after a rain or irrigation. Fruit does not lie on the soil surface, which reduces some fruit rot problems and damage from some pests that live in the mulch and soil surface...cont'd

http://www.texasgardener.com/pastissues/marapr02/verticalgardening.html


Basics of Vertical Gardening (one minute video)
http://www.expertvillage.com/video/18330_vegetable-gardening-vertical.htm


Tips On Going Vertical: http://ezinearticles.com/?Tips-for-Growing-Vegetables-in-a-Vertical-Garden&id=1168052

HGTV Segment on Vertical Gardening: http://www.hgtv.com/hgtv/shows_gby/article/0,,HGTV_3842_1399479,00.html


Experimental Green Roof

Professor Tom Hutchinson (now retired) has spearheaded the Trent University Environmental and Resource Sciences Vegetable Garden project with a two-fold purpose: to monitor ozone levels and conduct environmental research and to raise 30 to 40 different crops of produce which is donated to the Seasoned Spoon, Trent Us local and vegetarian caf, and Food Not Bombs, a local community organization that provides free meals outside City Hall every Monday, as well as to various other community groups, such as the Brock Mission and the YWCA, and the kitchens of volunteers. The roof is roughly 300 by 100 feet, two-thirds of which is under cultivation, the rest is grass. On the rooftop garden different varieties of heritage seeds are used. In addition to producing diverse and organic produce, the rooftop garden serves as a test zone for tropospheric ozone. Ozone damages local crops such as corn, beans and wheat (Arthur, 2005).

The rooftop garden has a depth of 18 inches of media which produces vegetables such as artichoke, sweet potatoes, squash, kale, beets, carrots, radishes, broccoli, peppers, zucchini, beans, turnips, eggplants, melons, pumpkins, and ground cherries.

http://www.greenroofs.com/projects/pview.php?id=558

----

Sky vegetables could change world food business.

Building and operating commercial greenhouses on supermarket rooftops in the United States is the award-winning idea for a new business named Sky Vegetables.

It is an idea expected to be widely adopted around the world as peak oil cost increases and climate change problems seriously challenge traditional agricultural production.

Last month the Sky Vegetables business plan won the $10,000 top prize in the 2008 G.Steven Burrill Business Plan Competition for students of the University of Wisconsin-Madison.

According to the Wisconsin Technology Network News, Sky Vegetables won top prize following a review of business plans of 17 start-up companies.

Sky Vegetables prototype green roof investment intends to break even 20 months from now. It proposes to operate its rooftop greenhouses as separate entities above supermarkets and its business model calls for year-round rooftop hydroponic cultivation of vegetables, fruits, herbs, and flowers for retail sale immediately below. Fast expansion of the idea is expected as Sky Vegetables succeeds.

Produce will be picked as it ripens, and taken to the sales shelf in less than half and hour. Market research has shown this as a big sales clincher...cont'd

http://greenroofs.wordpress.com/2008/04/28/sky-vegetables-could-change-world-food-business/


City Farmer's Green Roof:

http://www.cityfarmer.org/CFgreenroof.html

----

Rooftop Garden Blog and Source

http://wordpress.com/tag/green-roof/

FAQ about Rooftop Gardening:

http://www.roofmeadow.com/faqs/faqs.shtml


-----


Sending Your Veggies Up The Wall



I often wander through home shows looking for new green things to write about and are usually disappointed. Imagine our shock to show up at the local Home and Garden Show and find ourselves on Green Street- surrounded by booths with Bullfrog Power, Ecotech and others but the best of show was ELT Living Walls, a sort of green roof on its side- a modular, pregrown, scalable system of "sending your garden up the wall" We spoke with VP Keith Ardron, who informed us that it was launched exactly one week ago but that the interest has been huge. A plastic moulded version of the prototype will be available in May- you can do it yourself or buy it pregrown. "Using our patented Bioblanket system to wick water down behind the root zone, we are able to provide water to the back of the wall where the roots need it most. Use with perrenials, annuals, vegetables and herbs". Frank Lloyd Wright once quipped that doctors were lucky, they got to bury their mistakes but architects could only plant vines

http://www.treehugger.com/files/2006/03/modular_green_w.php



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kentauros Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Tue May-20-08 07:20 AM
Response to Original message
1. Great post!
I've bookmarked for further reading (and hopefully, some implementation) and now you've got your 5 recs :)

Treehugger is a great blog, isn't it? :)
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Dover Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Tue May-20-08 07:34 AM
Response to Reply #1
2. Thanks. Wanna come over and help me build a veggie wall?
Edited on Tue May-20-08 07:53 AM by Dover
That's what I want to try next. I just put up a pyracantha espalier on the west wall of my house in order to cut down on direct heat while also making the birds and lizard critters happy. FUN!

And check out these walls at the ELT Living Walls sites. Very inspirational!
http://www.eltlivingwalls.com/photo_gallery.php
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kentauros Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Tue May-20-08 01:08 PM
Response to Reply #2
7. Sure! Where do you live?
:P

I'm going to have to do something like it since all I have available is a small concrete "porch" outside my apartment windows. There's a metal railing and I have a few inedible items out there, but I have never gotten into container gardening. I guess since in years past I was able to grow food plants and herbs almost without much effort, when it came to containers, I was outside my element. That and most places I've lived in for the last decade have no room for a garden, much less the proper compost heap I would require to accompany it. There are still people that cannot appreciate the wonderful smell of rotting food and plant wastes ;)

I have thought about those inverted pots, but I need to see what else can be grown in them other than tomatoes. Maybe strawberries?

I'm going to have to read up on how to do the living wall stuff; that's all pretty cool and definitely inspiring :)
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Dover Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Wed May-21-08 03:59 AM
Response to Reply #7
12. Hey neighbor! Check your inbox.
Edited on Wed May-21-08 04:44 AM by Dover
I think some of the first vertical gardening links in my post might be very helpful for turning your 'porch' into a little edible garden paradise.
And if you could rig a way to hang baskets for veggies, that might save some space as well.
Perhaps you could get some of those planter boxes that have the brackets for attaching to a railing or get one of those nursery display shelf units that could hold several containers.

And BTW, I found this kind of intriguing and would love to hear more - "I guess since in years past I was able to grow food plants and herbs almost without much effort..."

What's the story there?

Just a few more links to jump start your imagination:


Turn Your Patio Into A Voluminous Vegetable Garden
by: Jill Homer

My first apartment was a second-story condo in an urban complex, far displaced from the groomed suburban landscapes and sprawling gardens I had grown up with. My only connection to the outdoors was a small porch, surrounded by brown siding and a fading carpet of artificial turf.

To add a little color to the patio, I adopted a few small tomato plants from a friend who had started his garden indoors, and planted them in large pots near my railing. To my surprise, they started to grow. Soon I had filled the 5 x 10 space with more than a dozen ceramic pots, plastic containers, and beach pails filled with peppers, tomatoes, cucumbers, lettuce and pole beans. Before I knew it, my porch was a curtain of green and my meals regularly featured home-grown vegetables.

cont'd

http://www.rentaldecorating.com/gardenpatio.htm

================================

Apartment Patio Garden links:

http://ohmyapt.apartmentratings.com/gardening.html

http://www.wikihow.com/Create-a-Patio-Garden

http://www.kaboodle.com/reviews/apartment-patio-garden-design-ideas

===================================

All Kinds of Railing & Fence Planters:
http://www.hooksandlattice.com/rapl.html

teak planter boxes (add railing brackets or place on the ground or shelf)
http://stores.ebay.com/DIAMOND-TROPICAL-HARDWOODS_Teak-Planter-Tree-Boxes_W0QQcolZ2QQdirZ1QQfsubZ970795QQftidZ2QQtZkm


Handy local gardening link:
http://www.chron.com/houstongardening/






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gardening gal Donating Member (2 posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Mon Jul-21-08 09:29 AM
Response to Reply #7
22. Vertical Gardening
Hi everyone, I'm new to forums but not new to gardening. Vertical gardening is not a new trend but it's becoming much more popular due to lack of space for most folks. You can grow veggies or herbs in containers or in some cases your window sill. If you need more information pick up a free book on vertical gardening. http://www.verticalgardeningsecrets.com/freereport.html. I have seen people plant gardens on their patio, fence or any structure that is standing. Some are pretty imaginative and some are downright bizzare. Gotta run but I really like this forum.

gardening gal
http://www.verticalgardeningsecrets.com
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gardening gal Donating Member (2 posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Mon Jul-21-08 09:35 AM
Response to Reply #7
23. Hi kentauros
I'm new to this forum but if you want information or some ideas on what you can grow pick up this free book http://www.verticalgardeningsecrets.com/freereport.html It should give you some great ideas on what you can do with that limited space you have. Best of luck with your garden.

gardening gal

http://www.verticalgardeningsecrets.com
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LiberalEsto Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Tue May-20-08 08:23 AM
Response to Original message
3. Thank you!
I've been doing a modified version of Square Foot Gardening for three years. The best thing I learned was trellising tomatoes, cucumbers and pole beans, using sections of clothesline tied to an upside down U made of metal electrical conduit pipe.

Here is info on making the trellises:
http://faq.gardenweb.com/faq/lists/sqfoot/2003115737000473.html

This keeps everything off the ground and makes things easy to pick. Vertical gardening is good for picking off suckers and unwanted bugs. I can plant more varieties of tomatoes when the plants are trained to climb up ropes.

I also tried trellising small watermelons the first year. It worked okay, but as soon as the melons got too heavy for the vine to hold them, I had to make slings for them with lengths of small-hole nylon netting (the stuff used to make ballet tutus - easily found at fabric stores.)

More info:
http://www.squarefootgardening.com/html/FAQ-Short-Starting-5-11.htm
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Dover Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Tue May-20-08 10:25 AM
Response to Reply #3
6. Very handy info. Thanks!..n/t
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sandnsea Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Tue May-20-08 01:41 PM
Response to Reply #3
8. nylon slings
Please explain further, and can I put a melon vine in a big pot and trellis it up?
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LiberalEsto Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Tue May-20-08 02:05 PM
Response to Reply #8
9. Slings
Edited on Tue May-20-08 02:06 PM by LiberalEsto
I took scissors and cut a big piece of nylon net that was at least twice the width of the full-sixed melon it would eventually become.(double thickness for extra strength)

I made sure the netting was long enough to go around the melon on both sides and reach the top of the trellis, so I could tie it to the metal cross bar. I used nylon net because it's fairly strong and slightly stretchy, but doesn't get moldy.

People on square-foot gardening websites say they've used old pantyhose to support melons, etc. I might try that this summer.

Here's a link on trellising melons http://www.garden.org/foodguide/browse/veggie/vines_care/642


I don't know about big pots, I've never tried growing melons in them. You would need a very strong trellis.
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BR_Parkway Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Tue May-20-08 09:08 AM
Response to Original message
4. The greenhouses on top of grocery stores was a "duh, why didn't
anyone think of this sooner" idea that I'm totally loving.
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Dover Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Tue May-20-08 10:22 AM
Response to Reply #4
5. lol...exactly my sentiments. A great idea until we all begin to grow our own.
I think we're seeing a Renaissance of vegetable and other gardening around the world...both of necessity and a return to more natural living. I wonder if architects will begin to introduce a similar kind of roof gardening into residential homes and apartments along with other green technology as a selling point? It used to be swimming pools, now it's rain collection, etc.
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silverweb Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Tue May-20-08 02:39 PM
Response to Original message
10. Very interesting!
Bookmarked for further study.

Thanks!

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AlecBGreen Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Tue May-20-08 09:29 PM
Response to Original message
11. gracias!
I dig the Alaskan cobb house with the Green roof. Neat quote too:

Circle City, Alaska, 1898, 75 miles south of the Arctic Circle:
"Circle City was also proud of its beautiful early spring lawns and flower beds, which like the hanging gardens of Babylon, grew on the flat roof tops, the lawn grass and flower bulbs rooted in the roof sod, sprouted and thrust their leaves upward, as if growing beneath tropic skies. In the month of May these beautiful lawns and flower beds, covering the one-storied flat-roofed town gave the approaching traveller the illusion that he was entering a raised but wide field of green crops and flaming flowers. Many a vegetable garden grew on the housetops when the earth supporting them was solidly frozen many feet in depth."


Thanks again for sharing! :toast:

-Alec
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Dover Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Thu May-22-08 11:44 AM
Response to Reply #11
17. Roofing it
Edited on Thu May-22-08 11:46 AM by Dover
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RedEarth Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Wed May-21-08 08:29 AM
Response to Original message
13. Great post......... here's a link to a gardening forum site I visit
They have forums that cover virtually all forms of gardening....it's truly a great resource for folks that enjoy gardening.

List of forums....scroll down on the right side to find the forum on vertical gardening.........

http://forums.gardenweb.com/forums/
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Dover Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Wed May-21-08 09:33 AM
Response to Reply #13
15. Thanks for the link
It really does look like a great resource. Added it to my bookmarks.
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Dover Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Wed May-21-08 08:37 AM
Response to Original message
14. Hey apartment dwellers, here's some inspiration! Apartment Patio/Balcony Gardening >>>


My exchange with kentauros upthread about apt. gardens got me wondering about that. Maybe there are even books on this subject...sort of a niche of gardens that few get to see since many are way up in the sky.

Anyway, hope to see some posts and pics of inspirational apartment garden projects. Instead of square foot gardening, maybe we need to have some 8' X 10' apartment balcony garden books. Would love to see the transformation (both vegetable and decorative types) within such a limited space.
I think space and weight restrictions might make a good argument in favor of using the green wall technique and containers (like from ELT Living Walls http://www.eltlivingwalls.com/ ) depending on the growing medium used.

Our empty panels weigh 5lbs and the planted panels range from 35-45 lbs (13 to 16lbs per sq ft) depending on the type of growth medium used. The panels with extensions weigh 10 lbs empty and 45-55 lbs (16-20lbs per sq ft) planted depending on the soil used.



And for small plants another type of vertical container:
http://theverticalgarden.com/

All Kinds of Railing & Fence Planters:
http://www.hooksandlattice.com/rapl.html

Teak Planter Boxes:
http://stores.ebay.com/DIAMOND-TROPICAL-HARDWOODS_Teak-Planter-Tree-Boxes_W0QQcolZ2QQdirZ1QQfsubZ970795QQftidZ2QQtZkm

A comfortable, inviting place to sit would be important for me.
Either a cafe table and chair, or better yet...one of these hammock chairs (and stand)
particularly the ones that are full enough to also allow you to pull your feet up and then stretch them out with the hammock stetching the length of your legs -
__________________________________________________


Connect with other apartment dwellers who are avid or closet gardeners by starting a Meetup Group in your area around this topic: http://www.meetup.com/

___________________________________________________________________________________________________





Turn Your Patio Into A Voluminous Vegetable Garden
by: Jill Homer

My first apartment was a second-story condo in an urban complex, far displaced from the groomed suburban landscapes and sprawling gardens I had grown up with. My only connection to the outdoors was a small porch, surrounded by brown siding and a fading carpet of artificial turf.

To add a little color to the patio, I adopted a few small tomato plants from a friend who had started his garden indoors, and planted them in large pots near my railing. To my surprise, they started to grow. Soon I had filled the 5 x 10 space with more than a dozen ceramic pots, plastic containers, and beach pails filled with peppers, tomatoes, cucumbers, lettuce and pole beans. Before I knew it, my porch was a curtain of green and my meals regularly featured home-grown vegetables.

cont'd

http://www.rentaldecorating.com/gardenpatio.htm

~~~~

Question:
My husband and I recently moved to an apartment. I am seeking ideas for inexpensive vegetable patio gardening. There isn't much direct sunlight on our patio.
Hardiness Zone: 8a

Michelle from Dallas, TX

Answer:

Michelle,
Growing vegetables on your patio certainly doesn't need to be expensive. The lack of sunlight, however, could prove to be a problem. For successful growth, most vegetables will need a minimum of 5 hours of direct sunlight a day. Some will need even more. "Leafy" vegetables (cabbage, lettuce) will tolerate the least amount of light, but vegetables like tomatoes, cucumbers and carrots will need more sun. You'll have to experiment to see what grows best. To maximize the light you have, use strategically placed shiny materials and light colored rocks around your containers to reflect light back onto the plants.

The most inexpensive way to start vegetables is from seed. Varieties labeled "patio, bush, or dwarf" are often bred specifically for container gardening. Saving seeds from year to year will cut down on expenses even further, but you'll need to start with heirloom seeds and avoid hybrids if you want offspring true to the parent plants.

Just about anything that can hold a soil can be fashioned into a container: pails, trashcans, dishpans, plastic detergent or cat litter containers (cut down), wooden or wicker baskets, or even old leather or rubber boots. I like containers made from plastic materials, even though they tend to deteriorate over time with repeated sun exposure. They don't dry out as fast a terra cotta, transfer heat or rust like metal, and you can usually recycle them when you're done using them. If you use plastic containers, try not to spend much on them. Crops with shallow roots, like radishes, beets and onions, will grow just fine in old cake pans. Provide cages or trellises for climbers like beans, peas and cucumbers to save space, or plant them in hanging baskets and let their vines trail downward. If you don't have anything suitable on hand, shop around at flea markets, rummage sales or dollar stores. Make sure your containers have adequate drainage holes on the bottom.

In regards to a growing medium, plan on using a very light soil or a soil-less mix-something that will drain rapidly, yet hold nutrients and keep the plant's roots consistently moist. You'll need to water your vegetables daily and feed them frequently with a 1/2 strength liquid fertilizer like fish emulsion.

Ellen

About The Author: Ellen Brown is our Green Living and Gardening Expert. Click here to ask Ellen a question! Ellen Brown is an environmental writer and photographer and the owner of Sustainable Media, an environmental media company that specializes in helping businesses and organizations promote eco-friendly products and services. Contact her on the web at http://www.sustainable-media.com




http://bp3.blogger.com/_ruUugi8-l8U/RuwsWQ6c4EI/AAAAAAAAAmg/p4IcrFpqSWY/s400/aa+steen+flemming+at+his+balcony.jpg BALCONY OF DREAMS -

A great little balcony garden blog
by someone who has made a hobby of
finding interesting spaces around the world
http://balconyofdreams.blogspot.com/2007/01/tokyo-architects-balcony-garden.html


~~~~


Balcony Gardens bring another dimension to your life!

Being an apartment dweller shouldn't keep you from having a garden. Many types of gardens can be created on balconies. With the addition of floral color, a balcony becomes an entertainment center just right for relaxing. Turf, small shrubs, and dwarf trees can be used to create a suburban landscape in miniature above the ground. Balconies even offer the opportunity for food production, with flowering fruit trees and container-grown herbs and vegetables.

Whether transforming a high-rise penthouse or a simple second-floor terrace into a garden, a set of guidelines will aid in creating your "garden on high." First, consider how you wish to use the area. Are you looking for a colorful relaxation area or just privacy from an adjacent high-rise?

Second, evaluate the microclimate. Toward which direction does the balcony face? Note how much sun the area receives and for how long. If the balcony is recessed, does direct sunlight reach it at all? If the situation is very open, will you and your plantings be subjected to buffeting winds and scorching sunlight? Look at the area with a very critical eye before putting a lot of money in to the project. Some minor remodeling may need to be done to make the area inviting to both people and plants.

Safety considerations are another important factor to think about. Most balconies are required by building safety codes to support 60 pounds per square foot. Be sure to use a lightweight growing media which can reduce weight by up to 60% over standard garden soil. Avoid using heavy containers; plastics and cedar wood are recommended for low-weight situations....cont'd

http://www.mastergardenproducts.com/gardenerscorner/balcony_gardening.htm


~~~~

________________________________________________________

Bed of Grass (looks like some 'green wall' panels behind the grass bed as well).
www.scotttorrance.ca/home.html


~~~~


Rooftop Garden site with Balcony Garden section:
http://rooftopgardens.ca/en/balcony

Apartment Balcony Decorating Ideas (Oh My Apartment:
http://ohmyapt.apartmentratings.com/apartment-balcony-decorating-ideas.html
http://ohmyapt.apartmentratings.com/apartment-gardening.html


~~~~




Living On The Edge - Balcony Rooftop Designers Guild
http://permaculture.org.au/2006/03/13/living-on-the-edge-the-balcony-garden-designers-guild/








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Dover Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Wed May-21-08 10:16 AM
Response to Reply #14
16. Just want to add these cool hanging garden planter devices:
Edited on Wed May-21-08 10:25 AM by Dover
Hanging Gardens
Inventor: Bill Felknor, Felknor Ventures


To Learn More: http://topsyturvys.com

Products: http://topsyturvys.com/allproducts.html

No longer will you have to cage, stake or weed your tomato plants or battle cutworms and other ruinous critters to put fresh tomatoes on the table. The Topsy-Turvy planter allows you to grow beefsteaks, cherries or any other variety upside down on your balcony or deck. Simply fill the bag with potting soil, add a young seedling�almost any vine-growing fruit or vegetable will do�and let the leafy part hang out. Mount the hook, add water and fertilize. A young plant in a warm climate takes about a month to bloom and another month to bear fruit.






Or a more expensive style:


The Upside-Down Tomato Garden.

This ingenious planter takes the toil out of tomatoes by elevating the planting bed so vines grow downward. Hanging vines need almost no attention as tomatoes ripen in the air (not on the ground) where they wont rot. Complementary plants like basil, parsley, rosemary, and peppers can be planted on top, which holds up to 80 lbs. of topsoil. The compact planter can fit in any space with ample sunlight, even condominium balconies. A hollow base filled with sand (not included) keeps it stable and upright. The plastic planting bed, supported by PVC pipes, has openings for four tomato plants underneath, with pop-out perforations for four additional openings. Minimal assembly; requires no tools. 48" H x 25" sq. (19 lbs.) ................. $74.95

http://s7ondemand1.scene7.com/is/image/Hammacher/67403?wid=180

?400x400







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Dover Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Mon Jun-16-08 12:16 AM
Response to Reply #16
18. Freestanding 4-arm Plant Hanger, Easy Raised Bed Frame & Cover, & Grow Rack
Edited on Mon Jun-16-08 12:17 AM by Dover
3 Items For Your Patio/Balcony Garden




Freestanding Four-Arm Plant Hanger
Constructed of thick, powder-coated steel, this freestanding 7-foot tall hanger holds up to 250 pounds and has a sturdy base to keep it upright and stable on a deck or patio.

Freestanding hanger for deck or patio
Ideal support for our Revolution Planter
Use seasonally for birdfeeders and hanging flower baskets
$99
http://www.gardeners.com/Post%20Hanger/VegetableGardening_Accessories,37-623,default,cp.html


And a raised bed frame with cover:
http://www.greenhousekit.com/guarden-minigreenhouse.htm




STANDARD - 5.25" - MINI GREENHOUSE For serious High-Yield gardening, maximum measurement 4' wide by 8' long. Inside height of 43"!

The Greenhouse film included with the GK Series protects against Frost in the early spring and Extends the growing season in late fall. If deer, birds, rabbits are a concern use our PEST NETTING to thwart these uninvited guests!
Place your Guarden on a PATIO, DECK or BALCONY or create a STANDUP garden. - just put a landscape lining inside the frame first AND be sure the structure can hold the total weight (estimated 1300 lbs - includes soil, plants, Guarden). Use lightweight soil (available at your local gardening center) to reduce the weight to about 650 lbs!


Grow Rack:_______________

Juliana Grow Rack
Featuring a removable, UV-coated plastic cover, these grow racks are ideal for extending the growing season in the spring and fall! Plus, their compact size allow them to be placed on decks, patios, or indoors next to a window.
Grow racks are ideal for starting seeds in the early spring as you would use a coldframe.

Grow racks come with a UV protected, clear, vinyl cover which holds in humidity reducing plant's watering needs. Easy access and ventilation is provided by the zippered door panel in the covering.

Grow racks also include a powder coated steel frame and multiple steel shelves which are perfect for maximum growing in a small space.

Grow racks include:
Attractive dark green plastic and steel frame
Vinyl slip-on covering with zippered door
4 adjustable shelves to accommodate taller plants

http://www.greenhousekit.com/growracks.htm










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conscious evolution Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Mon Jun-16-08 06:28 AM
Response to Original message
19. Thanks for the links
The local land trust I am involved with has been having a dilemma in how to deal with gardening space.We have a steep slope on the property we have been trying to figure out how to use for gardens without having to build expensive terraces.
Some of the ideas in these articles will definitely be usefull.
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Dover Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Tue Jun-17-08 09:33 PM
Response to Original message
20. Green Roof Articles - Dwell.com (with useful links) and a privacy screen idea for balconies/decks.
Edited on Tue Jun-17-08 09:42 PM by Dover
http://media.dwell.com/images/ACROS+Fukuoka+building+Green+Roof.jpg

Green Roof Movement Growing

http://www.dwell.com/daily/blog/19439789.html

--

Green Roofs From The Ground Up

http://www.dwell.com/daily/blog/19985504.html

--




And from the March 2008 issue a cool idea for a balcony or deck screen to get both privacy and plants.
The actual issue (but not the online archived issue here) has another much better photo. This one only shows a side view. The idea is to create a frame with a few structural verticals and then horizontal bars spaced evenly (according to the height measurement of the planter boxes) and hang wooden planter boxes of various lengths attached to the bars with random spacing allowing light and views to peek through in the open spaces.
On the opposite side a heavy duty screen is attached the full length and width of the frame and vines are planted at it's base. The vines could be ornamental or vegetable variety.

http://www.dwell.com/homes/new/15073336.html
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Dover Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Wed Jul-16-08 10:40 AM
Response to Original message
21. 'Farm In The Sky' Planned for NYC
'Farm in the sky' planned for New York
By Matthew Moore
7/15/08


_____________________________________


Plans for a "vertical farm" growing crops in the centre of New York are a step closer to becoming reality.

Local officials in Manhattan are drawing up a study to investigate whether a farm skyscraper would be economically and environmentally viable.

Urban vertical farms have been mooted by architects for several years, but until now had been widely dismissed as expensive and impractical.

But there now appears to be a real drive to push ahead with a pilot project. "I think we can really do this," said Scott Stringer, the borough president of Manhattan and the man who hopes the pitch the idea to the mayor's office. "We could get the funding."

He added: "Obviously we don't have vast amounts of vacant land, but the sky is the limit in Manhattan"....cont'd


http://www.telegraph.co.uk/global/main.jhtml?xml=/global/2008/07/16/noindex/eafarms115.xml&CMP=EMC-expat2008
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