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How long should I just let the baby cry before I do something?

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NightWatcher Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sun Nov-20-11 07:31 PM
Original message
How long should I just let the baby cry before I do something?
I mean, wow, she's loud. I can hear her all the way from the trunk of the car.






















JUST KIDDING.


We're getting a top tooth tonight it would appear and nothing will soothe her. They say that you can dip their pacifier in some rum or whisky and it will calm them, but I've found it works better to take a shot or two (or four) myself, then the crying doesnt bother me






JUST KIDDING.


I never drink when she's in the house with me.

...And, she's quiet...for now
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CaliforniaPeggy Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sun Nov-20-11 07:42 PM
Response to Original message
1. My dear NightWatcher!
I clearly and vividly recall when my oldest daughter was getting her first teeth...

She was normally a very good baby, hardly cried or fussed at all...

But suddenly she was soooo fussy.

I couldn't figure it out.....until I looked in her mouth! I could see the tiny serrated edges inside her gum. I was horrified and I realized that was what was making her fuss.

It got a lot easier after that. I just held her and soothed her the best I could...

I'm glad yours is quiet now...


:hi:
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NightWatcher Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sun Nov-20-11 07:45 PM
Response to Reply #1
4. plus, she's drooling like a fountain
the Mrs. cannot stand to hear her cry at all, but I realize sometimes she's going to cry for a few minutes
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Duer 157099 Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sun Nov-20-11 07:43 PM
Response to Original message
2. What are you doing
drinking in the trunk of your car anyway?
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elleng Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sun Nov-20-11 07:44 PM
Response to Original message
3. You know about anbesol + similar stuff, right?
Baby downstairs also teething.
:-(
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Major Nikon Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sun Nov-20-11 07:53 PM
Response to Original message
5. cold stuff often helps
If she's old enough to have solid foods, you can feed her frozen fruit or veggies and let her gnaw on them, or you can get some of those teething toys that are made to go in the freezer. A frozen damp washcloth will work in a pinch.

I certainly was known to pop a cork when my kids were teething. Not to excess, but a shot or two of whiskey on ice put things into much better perspective.
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DebJ Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Tue Nov-22-11 01:14 PM
Response to Reply #5
19. Great advice. After numbing the gums with something cold,
like a banana, they can also eat more normal portions. My grandson was crying both because of teething pain and because it hurt too much to use his bottle, so he was hungry as well. After gnawing on a frozen banana, he gulped the bottle right down and was much the happier.

That said, my daughter cried her entire month four of life, for no apparent reason at all. However, that seems to have eliminated most crankiness from her other 30 years of life; she is the most optimistic and cheerful person I ever met.
But man, living through that month is not something I'd want to do!
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applegrove Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sun Nov-20-11 10:03 PM
Response to Original message
6. Just pick her up, hold her and walk with her, rocking her as you move.
Edited on Sun Nov-20-11 10:03 PM by applegrove
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Swede Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sun Nov-20-11 10:04 PM
Response to Original message
7. 18 years.
Then let it free.
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Taverner Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sun Nov-20-11 10:05 PM
Response to Original message
8. Leave it in the garage for about an hour
That will teach it

:evilfrown:

:evilgrin:
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nolabear Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sun Nov-20-11 10:16 PM
Response to Original message
9. Awww, pauvre enfant. And her too.
All above ideas help. Paregoric is now out of the question but it used to be common before the idea of giving babies opiates fell out of favor for some reason.

Buck up. This'll seem like nothing when she gets to be about thirteen. :evilgrin:
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mzteris Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sun Nov-20-11 10:30 PM
Response to Original message
10. Don't they make Baby Orajel anymore?
Numbs the gums.

And cold teething rings or the like....

And go ahead - a shot for you isn't going to hurt a damn thing. (Note I said "a"... not 5 or 6! :) )

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OhioBlue Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sun Nov-20-11 10:35 PM
Response to Reply #10
12. My pediatrician recommended against Orajel
especially when my son was really little - they said it could numb the back of their throat and lead to choking.
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mzteris Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Mon Nov-21-11 06:47 PM
Response to Reply #12
13. Well, I have one 30, one 18, and one 13
plus 5 nieces and & nephews 30 & over - and not one of them choked or died.

You don't use a whole glob. Just a little bit rubbed on the gum.
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OhioBlue Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Sun Nov-20-11 10:33 PM
Response to Original message
11. something cold to chew on
I used to keep a wet wash cloth in a baggie in the fridge to pull out for my son to chew - he wouldn't chew on it long.... just a few minutes.

If he was really fussy, I might give him tylenol.

But for the most part - I held him, rocked him, walked him... whatever to comfort him until he felt better and could fall asleep.
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hedgehog Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Mon Nov-21-11 07:06 PM
Response to Original message
14. Call you pediatrician and ask about baby dose of acetaminophen or ibuprofen....
you might be told NO! NO! NO!, but you might get a proper dosage. It hurts to cut a tooth! I remember when my 12 year molars came in.
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Yavin4 Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Mon Nov-21-11 10:28 PM
Response to Original message
15. Get Her A Job Cleaning Floors at the School
That'll learn her.
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madrchsod Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Tue Nov-22-11 12:57 AM
Response to Original message
16. the next time watch this......
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marzipanni Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Tue Nov-22-11 02:10 AM
Response to Original message
17. My mom gave me diaper service when we had our son
"Tidee Didee" LOL :D and they had a good newsletter with helpful baby advice. One suggestion for teething relief was to cut a carrot along its length, then in half across. Freeze the the thick end halves, then let baby gum/gnaw on the cold carrot which would thaw and be of rubbery consistency. Of course you always have to be with babies when they're eating, but these carrots never broke off in my son's mouth. He loved them so much he'd crawl up to the fridge and point up at the freezer compartment and say, "IH! IH!", when he wanted one.

Years ago when I was babysitting a 3-year-old boy he went to watch the rest of a kids' show in next room and was eating a zwieback biscuit - kind of like a thick slice of slightly sweet melba toast - while I was was cleaning up at the kitchen sink after lunch. Suddenly he appeared next to me, tugging on my shorts hem. I looked down and his lips were turning blue- I swept a big soggy hunk of zwieback out of the back of his mouth with my index finger. I was so amazed and relieved that he knew to come and get help- and realized then that little kids shouldn't eat by themselves, even for a few minutes.

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hunter Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Tue Nov-22-11 12:58 PM
Response to Original message
18. When I was a kid we chewed on dog toys. We had good dogs, they didn't mind.
We'd even try to chew on the dogs.

I had a very feral childhood. Frankly my parents are out there somewhere in the autistic spectrum, orbiting normal earth. :hi: mom, dad.

My own kids, well, my wife and I just carried them around everywhere. Otherwise they'd run away. They were little monkeys. Put them in a crib or playpen and they'd climb out. Look away and they'd be gone.

They slept in our bed between us too. There really wasn't any other place we could safely leave them. Hopefully we'd wake up if they tried to climb over.

When my oldest started walking my wife was afraid he'd get outside and freeze to death in the winter. I put those flip locks up high on the door where he couldn't reach them. Sure enough I walk into our living room one day and he's up on a chair unlocking the door. I'd been working in the kitchen and I thought he was sleeping.

My siblings and I survived our childhoods, and so did my kids, who are now in college and becoming very fine adults.

The sticky question is how did I survive as a parent?

I don't know. :shrug:

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amuse bouche Donating Member (153 posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Tue Nov-22-11 01:57 PM
Response to Original message
20. Poor baby
I was a total softie. I couldn't let them cry

Frozen teething rings can help and an occasional baby aspirin.

Aspirin is an analgesic. It takes the edge off the pain
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