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I got ridiculed for posting my thoughts on this before, but here goes... (induction roads) [View All]

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Bread and Circus Donating Member (1000+ posts) Send PM | Profile | Ignore Tue May-19-09 02:08 PM
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I got ridiculed for posting my thoughts on this before, but here goes... (induction roads)
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Edited on Tue May-19-09 02:10 PM by Bread and Circus
http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2009/05/19/competition-heats-up-in-r_n_205027.html

Engineers at South Korea's top-ranked KAIST university are meanwhile working on a novel prototype for an electric vehicle system: one that provides power on the go through induction strips laid into the roadway.

...

Suh, an MIT-trained inventor with some 60 international patents to his name, approached the challenge from another angle.

"Why not have power transmitted on the ground and pick it up without using mechanical contact?" he said in an interview in his office overlooking the staging grounds for the university's electric cars.

KAIST's "online" vehicles pick up power from trips, or inverters, embedded into the road rather than transmitted through rails or overhead wires. A small battery, one-fifth the size of the bulky batteries typically used, would give the vehicle enough power for another 50 miles (80 kilometers), said Cho Dong-ho, the scientist in charge of the project.

South Korea produces its own nuclear power, meaning it can produce a continuous supply of energy to fuel such a plan.

President Lee Myung-bak, whose government gave KAIST $50 million for two major projects, including the "online" electric vehicle, took a spin in February.

Online buses are running at the KAIST campus and will begin test runs soon on the resort island of Jeju.

But Seoul, which has promised to set aside $2 million for the underground charging system, is within Suh's sights. He said 9,000 gasoline-fueled buses now crisscross the capital, with 1,000 going out of commission each year. He envisions replacing those aging buses with electric models. Initial test runs are expected to take place this year.

Mueller, the consultant, called it a creative approach with potential.

"It sounds very intriguing; you don't store your energy, you provide it on the go." he said. "The (battery) storage problem is overcome instantly. That would be a very intriguing way of doing it."


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So there, smarter and more educated people than me don't think it's worth dismissing out of hand.

As far as I'm concerned induction roads (and highways, especially powered by solar in the desert) are a bit of an electric transportation holy grail.
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