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Catherina

Profile Information

Name: Catherina
Gender: Female
Member since: Mon Mar 3, 2008, 02:08 PM
Number of posts: 35,568

About Me

There are times that one wishes one was smarter than one is so that when one looks out at the world and sees the problems one wishes one knew the answers and I don\'t know the answers. I think sometimes one wishes one was dumber than one is so one doesn\'t have to look out into the world and see the pain that\'s out there and the horrible situations that are out there, and not know what to do - Bernie Sanders http://www.democraticunderground.com/128040277

Journal Archives

Allied Parties Give Backing to Venezuela's Maduro

Allied Parties Give Backing to Venezuela's Maduro

Following Chavez’s call in December for “unity, unity, and unity”, a multitude of leftist parties threw their weight behind the Presidential candidature of Nicolas Maduro this week.

Maduro will go into the April 14th elections with the formal backing of 14 political parties, two more than Chavez had in October 2012.

Maduro’s own party, the United Socialist Party of Venezuela (PSUV) was joined by its major allies, the Venezuelan Communist Party (PCV), as well as others such as REDES, Tupamaro, MEP, PPT, and Podemos in backing Chavez’s political successor this week.

These parties, which conform the alliance ‘the Gran Patriotic Pole’ (GPP), proved vital to the electoral success of Chavez in October, and are expected to play a significant role in both campaigning and votes for Maduro.

In October, the opposition alliance (MUD), which consists of over a dozen parties gained 6.6 million votes in total, beating Chavez’s party, the PSUV, which achieved 6.4 million votes. However the 1.8 million votes of the other allied revolutionary parties proved vital to push Chavez over the winning line and guarantee the future of his government.

Of these 1.8 million votes in October, the vast majority came from the Communist Party (490,000), followed by PPT (220,000), REDES (198,000), MEP (185,000), and Tupamaro (170,000).

The PCV Communist Party called a National Conference last week which voted unanimously to back Maduro as their candidate. “With the strength of our people and of the revolutionary and popular organizations, Nicolas Maduro will be elected as the constitutional President”, proclaimed the General Secretary of the PCV, Oscar Figuera.

Maduro, accepting their backing at their conference, paid lengthy tribute to the struggle of the PCV as a revolutionary party, and thanked the communists for the hard work they put in in on the streets and in the communities.

Similarly, the Vice President of Podemos, Baudillo Reinoso, restated his party’s commitment with Maduro: “With Nicolas Maduro we will continue to advance and to improve the quality of lives of Venezuelans. We don’t just support him in words, but also in deeds”.

Adrian Paez, speaking on behalf of MEP, stated that “we won’t allow the opposition to take political power, we will give continuity to the Plan of the Nation and the Revolutionary Socialist Project”.

The leader of REDES, Juan Barreto, speaking at his party’s conference, made a call to back Maduro: “We should continue the struggle, because this is the best homage that we can give to our leader Hugo Chavez”.

The PCV also recognized the importance of the continuing of a wider alliance with other revolutionary forces, which will “give continuity and deepen the democratic, participative and progressive nature of the process of changes started in 1998 in Venezuela, it is necessary that we maintain and develop the alliance of diverse political and social factors”.

Recent polls have given Maduro a commanding lead ahead of April 14th, from between 14 and 18 percent. The latest, by private Venezuelan firm International Consulting Services, suggested Maduro was 17.7% ahead of his conservative rival. In October, Chavez defeated Capriles by 11% of the vote.

http://venezuelanalysis.com/news/8322


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http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/3.0/us/

Haitian Police Arrest 3 subversives with US $350,368 for opposition candidate Henrique Capriles

I simply have to redo this thread because someone posted a different version, lacking the important information, with the deliberate intention to mislead.


Dinero de la reconstrucción de Haití para la campaña de Capriles


En la mañana de este martes fueron arrestados en Haití tres ciudadanos, uno colombiano y dos venezolanos, que portaban de forma ilegal unos 350.368 dólares americanos en efectivo, los cuales serían utilizados en la campaña del candidato opositor Henrique Capriles Radonsky.

La denuncia fue realizada por Jorge Rodríguez, jefe del Comando de Campaña “Hugo Chávez” del candidato Nicolás Maduro para las elecciones presidenciales del 14 de abril de 2013, durante una rueda de prensa efectuada el día de hoy en compañía de la militancia revolucionaria.

Rodríguez precisó que cuando estas personas fueron interrogadas por funcionarios de la Policía Nacional de Haití, “señalaron que ese dinero estaba destinado a la campaña del candidato opositor Henrique Capriles”.

...

http://www.lahaine.org/index.php?blog=5&p=37161


On Tuesday morning, three people were arrested in Haiti, one Colombian and two Venezuelans, illegally carrying US $350,368 in cash, which would be used in the campaign of opposition candidate Henrique Capriles.

...

When the men were questioned by officers of the Haitian National Police, they said "that the money was intended for the campaign of opposition candidate Henrique Capriles".



The money was in suitcases and they were caught as the tried to board an unspecified plane to an unspecified destination. The three were arrested and taken into custody. Thank you Haiti. Keep them locked up for a while.

Top Human Rights officials in Argentina dismiss collaborator claims about Pope Francis as slander

I've read a ton of accounts about his alleged complicity and there are even many people saying he had no involvement whatsover, including Adolfo Perez Esquivel who won nobel prize for for documenting the atrocities "Perhaps he didn't have the courage of other priests, but he never collaborated with the dictatorship. Bergoglio was no accomplice of the dictatorship. He can't be accused of that."

The instant rumors about Pope Francis, the page 28 retractions are a tad too convenient. A few days ago I read the scandalous allegations gem in the UK Daily Mail that so many people take as gospel these days. As I skimmed it, I was struck by all the whimpy "documents appear to show", "documents appears to reveal", "documents suggest", "alleged"...

In that same article, it states that Beroglio dismissed the 2 priest from the order and that shortly after he dismissed them, they were picked up and became convinced he betrayed them. I'm confused as to how he could have betrayed them when they were already on the Junta's radar and a layperson they were associated with gave their names, under torture, to the Junta. And the claim that he withdrew his protection is silly. They both requested to leave the order, Bergoglia accepted and expelled them accordingly. How can he be to blame if they gave up any protection being members of the order could give them? I think it's dishonest of Verbitsky to twist that into an accusation that Bergoglio withdrew his protection. What did they expect? For him and the Jesuit order to take up arms to go liberate them?

I also tend to believe Bergoglio's version that he went to the Junta and pleaded for them because they were the only 2, out of 6000, who survived. Obviously someone went to the Junta and interceded for them and if it wasn't Bergoglio, then let the brave soul who did come forward.

What do we do with all the people who stated that Bergoglio wasn't involved and on the contrary, saved their lives? Dismiss them? Jorge Rafael Videla, the Junta leader at the time, was tried and convicted. During his court testimony and in subsequent interviews, he named several priest collaborators but Bergoglio's name never came up once.

More:

n 2010, Bergoglio declined to appear in court after being called to testify as a witness in the trial of 18 military officials who ran the Naval Mechanics School, where detainees were often taken and tortured. It was the same detention center where Yorio and Jalics were taken after their arrest on suspicion of associating with leftwing guerrillas in the Buenos Aires slums where they worked under Bergoglio.

Citing “clerical immunity” granted by Argentine law, Bergoglio insisted on giving testimony in his church offices and told investigators that he personally intervened with the country’s military rulers on behalf of the young priests. A transcript of his four-hour interview has been published online by Argentine rights groups, and attorneys close to the case verify its accuracy.

...

The criticism of the new pope for not doing enough has prompted several prominent Argentine rights activists, including Nobel Peace Prize winner Adolfo Perez Esquivel, to come to his defense in recent days.

“There were some priests and bishops that helped the dictatorship, and others who spoke out and died because of it. But Bergoglio wasn’t a collaborator,” said Graciela Fernandez Meijide, a politician and prominent human rights investigator whose 16-year-old son vanished after being snatched from his bed by soldiers in the middle of the night.

...

http://www.japantimes.co.jp/news/2013/03/17/world/popes-alleged-inaction-in-argentinas-dirty-war-is-scrutinized/


Former judge Alicia Oliveira goes even further, describing the claims against the Pope as an “outrage”. In an interview with the Perfil newspaper, she says that she saw Bergoglio twice weekly during the dictatorship, adding: “He was not in favour of the dictatorship, he even helped people try to leave the country.

“Once there was a young man who could not leave because he was a marked man, but he looked like Bergoglio so he gave him his identity papers, his clerical collar and his clerical robe so he could escape.

http://www.perfil.com/politica/Alicia-Oliveira-Garre-sabe-todo-lo-que-hizo-Bergoglio-20130315-0019.html


That man slipped across the border using Bergoglio's identity papers.


Oliveira was the Secretary of Human Rights of the Argentine Chancery under Rafael Bielsa and Néstor Kirchner.


Graciela Fernández Meijide, a human-rights activist and former member of the national commission on the disappearance of persons, told the Argentine press last week that “of all the testimony I received, never did I receive any testimony that Bergoglio was connected to the dictatorship.”

http://stream.wsj.com/story/latest-headlines/SS-2-63399/SS-2-191502/




RIO DE JANEIRO, Mar 19 2013 (IPS) - Brazilian theologian Leonardo Boff, a leading exponent of liberation theology, the progressive current in the Latin American Catholic Church, does not believe reports that depict the new Pope Francis as collaborating with Argentina’s 1976-1983 dictatorship.

In this interview with IPS, Boff acknowledged that it was a “controversial issue,” and that there were contradictory accounts. But he said he believed prominent human rights defenders in Argentina who denied that Archbishop Jorge Bergoglio, elected pope by the Vatican, had any ties with Argentina’s military regime.

...

Q: In Argentina, the election of Bergoglio was criticised because of his supposed complicity in the abduction of two Jesuit priests during the dictatorship.

A: I know that in general the Argentine church was not very prophetic in denouncing state terrorism. Despite that, there were bishops like (Enrique) Angelleli, who died in a shady manner, (Jorge) Novak, (Jaime) De Nevares and Jerónimo Podestá, among others, who were openly critical.

But with regard to Bergoglio, I prefer to believe Adolfo Pérez Esquivel, a Nobel Peace Prize-winner, and a former member of the National Commission on the Disappearance of Persons (Graciela Fernández Meijide), who say that allegation is slanderous. They didn’t find a single mention of Bergoglio’s name on documents or legal accusations.

On the contrary, he saved many people by hiding them in the Colegio Máximo de San Miguel (Argentina’s main Jesuit training centre). Besides, it runs against his known character – he is strong but also tender, and poor, and he continuously speaks out against social injustice in Argentina and for the need for justice, not philanthropy

...

http://www.ipsnews.net/2013/03/qa-what-matters-isnt-bergoglio-and-his-past-but-francis-and-his-future/



Chris Trotter, a left wing journalist who got taken in, nailed it here in his recent article Mea Culpa – The Pope Is Not A Fascist


In that article O’Shaughnessy levelled a number of serious accusations at the then Archbishop Jorge Bergoglio – all of which he has been forced to retract.

...

On that day, all over the world, left-wing journalists (myself included) had registered the fact that the new pope was an Argentine; that he had been born in 1936; and that he had been a senior Catholic prelate in Buenos Aires during Argentina’s “Dirty War”.

Immediately, we Googled “Bergoglio” and “Dirty War”, and – Bingo! – up popped O’Shaughnessy’s 2011 article. Twitter ensured that the story was up-and-running before the Pope had finished blessing the cheering crowds in St Peter’s Square.

...

So we kept trawling the Internet. What had Wikipedia to say about Jorge Bergoglio? Ah ha! It seems he was in involved in the Junta’s abduction and mistreatment of two Jesuit priests. Followers of “Liberation Theology”, these radical clerics had gone to work in the slums, come into contact with leftist revolutionaries, and paid the price.

Now we had more than enough! The new pope had consorted with fascists. As the Archbishop of Buenos Aires, he had not only failed to protect his flock, he hadn’t even protected members of his own Jesuit Order!

...

http://thedailyblog.co.nz/2013/03/18/mea-culpa-the-pope-is-not-a-fascist/


Wiki has since removed that information. Ironically, they got it from the Guardian.

Then to add insult to injury:

The Guardian’s credulity is mirrored in the online circulation of incorrectly captioned photos that claim to show Bergoglio giving Communion to dictator Jorge Videla, when in fact the priest in the photo is someone else.

http://www.firstthings.com/blogs/firstthoughts/2013/03/15/pope-francis-bergoglio-argentina-dictatorship/


Sadly the harm is done. The Guardian's falsehoods are printed everywhere now and it's gospel truth to many that Bergoglio hid war criminals in his summer home. None of the articles based on the Guardian's article even mention any corrections or retractions.

You know that old saying that a lie will get halfway around the world before the truth can get its boots on?


Where does this story come from? One man, Horacio Verbitzky, an advocacy journalist and leftist militant, who repeats the same discredited accusations any time the former Cardinal Bergoglio makes the news.

When he did so prior to the last papal conclave in 2005, John Allen, CNN's papal analyst, debunked it with one phone call to the Argentine headquarters of Amnesty International, which denounced the allegations as baseless.

http://www.southcoasttoday.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20130319/NEWS/303190324

Top Human Rights officials in Argentina dismiss collaborator claims about Pope Francis as slander

I've read a ton of accounts about his alleged complicity and there are even many people saying he had no involvement whatsover, including Adolfo Perez Esquivel who won nobel prize for for documenting the atrocities "Perhaps he didn't have the courage of other priests, but he never collaborated with the dictatorship. Bergoglio was no accomplice of the dictatorship. He can't be accused of that."

The instant rumors about Pope Francis, the page 28 retractions are a tad too convenient. A few days ago I read the scandalous allegations gem in the UK Daily Mail that so many people take as gospel these days. As I skimmed it, I was struck by all the whimpy "documents appear to show", "documents appears to reveal", "documents suggest", "alleged"...

In that same article, it states that Beroglio dismissed the 2 priest from the order and that shortly after he dismissed them, they were picked up and became convinced he betrayed them. I'm confused as to how he could have betrayed them when they were already on the Junta's radar and a layperson they were associated with gave their names, under torture, to the Junta. And the claim that he withdrew his protection is silly. They both requested to leave the order, Bergoglia accepted and expelled them accordingly. How can he be to blame if they gave up any protection being members of the order could give them? I think it's dishonest of Verbitsky to twist that into an accusation that Bergoglio withdrew his protection. What did they expect? For him and the Jesuit order to take up arms to go liberate them?

I also tend to believe Bergoglio's version that he went to the Junta and pleaded for them because they were the only 2, out of 6000, who survived. Obviously someone went to the Junta and interceded for them and if it wasn't Bergoglio, then let the brave soul who did come forward.

What do we do with all the people who stated that Bergoglio wasn't involved and on the contrary, saved their lives? Dismiss them? Jorge Rafael Videla, the Junta leader at the time, was tried and convicted. During his court testimony and in subsequent interviews, he named several priest collaborators but Bergoglio's name never came up once.

More:

n 2010, Bergoglio declined to appear in court after being called to testify as a witness in the trial of 18 military officials who ran the Naval Mechanics School, where detainees were often taken and tortured. It was the same detention center where Yorio and Jalics were taken after their arrest on suspicion of associating with leftwing guerrillas in the Buenos Aires slums where they worked under Bergoglio.

Citing “clerical immunity” granted by Argentine law, Bergoglio insisted on giving testimony in his church offices and told investigators that he personally intervened with the country’s military rulers on behalf of the young priests. A transcript of his four-hour interview has been published online by Argentine rights groups, and attorneys close to the case verify its accuracy.

...

The criticism of the new pope for not doing enough has prompted several prominent Argentine rights activists, including Nobel Peace Prize winner Adolfo Perez Esquivel, to come to his defense in recent days.

“There were some priests and bishops that helped the dictatorship, and others who spoke out and died because of it. But Bergoglio wasn’t a collaborator,” said Graciela Fernandez Meijide, a politician and prominent human rights investigator whose 16-year-old son vanished after being snatched from his bed by soldiers in the middle of the night.

...

http://www.japantimes.co.jp/news/2013/03/17/world/popes-alleged-inaction-in-argentinas-dirty-war-is-scrutinized/


Former judge Alicia Oliveira goes even further, describing the claims against the Pope as an “outrage”. In an interview with the Perfil newspaper, she says that she saw Bergoglio twice weekly during the dictatorship, adding: “He was not in favour of the dictatorship, he even helped people try to leave the country.

“Once there was a young man who could not leave because he was a marked man, but he looked like Bergoglio so he gave him his identity papers, his clerical collar and his clerical robe so he could escape.

http://www.perfil.com/politica/Alicia-Oliveira-Garre-sabe-todo-lo-que-hizo-Bergoglio-20130315-0019.html


That man slipped across the border using Bergoglio's identity papers.


Oliveira was the Secretary of Human Rights of the Argentine Chancery under Rafael Bielsa and Néstor Kirchner.


Graciela Fernández Meijide, a human-rights activist and former member of the national commission on the disappearance of persons, told the Argentine press last week that “of all the testimony I received, never did I receive any testimony that Bergoglio was connected to the dictatorship.”

http://stream.wsj.com/story/latest-headlines/SS-2-63399/SS-2-191502/




RIO DE JANEIRO, Mar 19 2013 (IPS) - Brazilian theologian Leonardo Boff, a leading exponent of liberation theology, the progressive current in the Latin American Catholic Church, does not believe reports that depict the new Pope Francis as collaborating with Argentina’s 1976-1983 dictatorship.

In this interview with IPS, Boff acknowledged that it was a “controversial issue,” and that there were contradictory accounts. But he said he believed prominent human rights defenders in Argentina who denied that Archbishop Jorge Bergoglio, elected pope by the Vatican, had any ties with Argentina’s military regime.

...

Q: In Argentina, the election of Bergoglio was criticised because of his supposed complicity in the abduction of two Jesuit priests during the dictatorship.

A: I know that in general the Argentine church was not very prophetic in denouncing state terrorism. Despite that, there were bishops like (Enrique) Angelleli, who died in a shady manner, (Jorge) Novak, (Jaime) De Nevares and Jerónimo Podestá, among others, who were openly critical.

But with regard to Bergoglio, I prefer to believe Adolfo Pérez Esquivel, a Nobel Peace Prize-winner, and a former member of the National Commission on the Disappearance of Persons (Graciela Fernández Meijide), who say that allegation is slanderous. They didn’t find a single mention of Bergoglio’s name on documents or legal accusations.

On the contrary, he saved many people by hiding them in the Colegio Máximo de San Miguel (Argentina’s main Jesuit training centre). Besides, it runs against his known character – he is strong but also tender, and poor, and he continuously speaks out against social injustice in Argentina and for the need for justice, not philanthropy

...

http://www.ipsnews.net/2013/03/qa-what-matters-isnt-bergoglio-and-his-past-but-francis-and-his-future/



Chris Trotter, a left wing journalist who got taken in, nailed it here in his recent article Mea Culpa – The Pope Is Not A Fascist


In that article O’Shaughnessy levelled a number of serious accusations at the then Archbishop Jorge Bergoglio – all of which he has been forced to retract.

...

On that day, all over the world, left-wing journalists (myself included) had registered the fact that the new pope was an Argentine; that he had been born in 1936; and that he had been a senior Catholic prelate in Buenos Aires during Argentina’s “Dirty War”.

Immediately, we Googled “Bergoglio” and “Dirty War”, and – Bingo! – up popped O’Shaughnessy’s 2011 article. Twitter ensured that the story was up-and-running before the Pope had finished blessing the cheering crowds in St Peter’s Square.

...

So we kept trawling the Internet. What had Wikipedia to say about Jorge Bergoglio? Ah ha! It seems he was in involved in the Junta’s abduction and mistreatment of two Jesuit priests. Followers of “Liberation Theology”, these radical clerics had gone to work in the slums, come into contact with leftist revolutionaries, and paid the price.

Now we had more than enough! The new pope had consorted with fascists. As the Archbishop of Buenos Aires, he had not only failed to protect his flock, he hadn’t even protected members of his own Jesuit Order!

...

http://thedailyblog.co.nz/2013/03/18/mea-culpa-the-pope-is-not-a-fascist/


Wiki has since removed that information. Ironically, they got it from the Guardian.

Then to add insult to injury:

The Guardian’s credulity is mirrored in the online circulation of incorrectly captioned photos that claim to show Bergoglio giving Communion to dictator Jorge Videla, when in fact the priest in the photo is someone else.

http://www.firstthings.com/blogs/firstthoughts/2013/03/15/pope-francis-bergoglio-argentina-dictatorship/


Sadly the harm is done. The Guardian's falsehoods are printed everywhere now and it's gospel truth to many that Bergoglio hid war criminals in his summer home. None of the articles based on the Guardian's article even mention any corrections or retractions.

You know that old saying that a lie will get halfway around the world before the truth can get its boots on?


Where does this story come from? One man, Horacio Verbitzky, an advocacy journalist and leftist militant, who repeats the same discredited accusations any time the former Cardinal Bergoglio makes the news.

When he did so prior to the last papal conclave in 2005, John Allen, CNN's papal analyst, debunked it with one phone call to the Argentine headquarters of Amnesty International, which denounced the allegations as baseless.

http://www.southcoasttoday.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20130319/NEWS/303190324

Opposition leader says he would halt Venezuela’s oil shipments to Cuba if elected president

Opposition leader says he would halt Venezuela’s oil shipments to Cuba if elected president

By Associated Press,

CARACAS, Venezuela — Venezuelan opposition leader Henrique Capriles says he would stop trading oil to Cuba for services such as Cuban doctors providing medical care for Venezuela’s poor.

Capriles says he opposes selling petroleum to Cuba under preferential terms because it doesn’t benefit Venezuela.

Former President Hugo Chavez forged close ties with Fidel and Raul Castro in Cuba, and he provided the island with more than 100,000 barrels of oil a day on beneficial terms.

During a speech Monday, Capriles said that if he becomes president, in his words, “not another drop of oil will go toward financing the government of the Castros.”

...

http://www.washingtonpost.com/world/the_americas/opposition-leader-says-he-would-halt-venezuelas-oil-shipments-to-cuba-if-elected-president/2013/03/18/12ce9c5e-9023-11e2-9173-7f87cda73b49_story.html



Capriles should run for Congress as a Republican. He would get far with his platform that medical services for the poor don't benefit the country. Medical services, food, water, housing... got it. Silly me. I forgot. It's shiny skyscrapers and fatcat portfolios that benefit a country.

On this, definitely though I'm sure the investor class will see things differently.

Forbes already started with some garbage that he's wrong and it's the profits of neoliberalism that pull the poor out of their poverty. It was so obscene that now I need to find it again for this post.


Found it.

Is Jorge Bergoglio, The New Pope Francis, A Capitalist?

...

So today, while on an investment committee conference call, when the white smoke appeared and shortly thereafter we learned that an Argentinian Cardinal named Jorge Bergoglio had been elected and had chosen for himself the name Pope Francis, I decided that this time I was going to share my first thought with friends and colleagues on the call. Here it is: the Pope will probably move the Church culturally to the right, and more likely move it economically to the left.

In other words, the age old answer to the question, “Is the Pope Catholic?” is, “Yes.” But the answer to the question, “Is the Pope capitalist?” is, “Probably not.”

...

But let’s not ignore the fact that the poor profoundly benefit when the economy grows; more so, even than when the church offers them a soup kitchen to visit. Neither the rightist Peron, nor the current leftist administration of Argentina has done much good for the poor. A century ago it was one of the world’s more prosperous countries, but it’s repeated rejection of both classical liberalism and (later) neo-liberalism, caused its prosperity to plummet compared with much of the rest of the world.

It is no coincidence that Argentina’s score of 47 on the Index of Economic Freedom (placing it as a miserable 160th of the freest counties in the world) accompanies its terrible poverty. Even mild attempts at ‘austerity’ were criticized by the Cardinal and much of the Argentine Church, but when austerity was abandoned and the currency devalued and debt reneged upon, the lot of Argentina’s poor became even poorer.

...

The new pope seems like a wonderful man. Humble, simple, decent. But if he is going to help the Church do as much as it possibly can for the poor, he’d do well, not just to look to the wonderful St. Francis, who became poor to serve the poor, but also to the John Paul the Great who, having lived under socialism in its most virulent form, embraced the market economy for its ability to liberate the poor.

http://www.forbes.com/sites/jerrybowyer/2013/03/13/is-jorge-bergoglio-the-new-pope-francis-a-capitalist/


I'm not sure what planet the author was on when he wrote this but I hope he didn't write it with a straight face. I gag. Hard.

Read the whole article. I assure you it's a.... *masterpiece*.

Cardinal Bergoglio, now Pope Francis: Against liberalism, critic of the IMF and foreign debt

I posted this in GD but that was a mistake lol. It's not going to get any traction there but may interest some folks here.

This article is very badly written. You can tell it's written by a Spanish speaker but it still makes perfect sense. And the document can't possibly be called “Episcopal Conference of Argentina”, that sounds more like the authorship heading.


Against liberalism, critic of the IMF and foreign debt

By Carlos Burgueño
Ambito Financiero staff

Harsh critic of free-market liberalism, the IMF and adjustment policies, and defender of the debt restructuring processes, Jorge Bergoglio, now Pope Francis, never refused to define where he stands when it comes down to economics, even in the most difficult moments. Adept to the most classical conceptions of the Social Doctrine of the Church, he openly confronted adjustment policies during the 2001 crisis, and then, in 2011, he battled those same remedies when intended to solve debt problems in Europe.

Bergoglio took an active stance against liberal policies since his early years, but it became public in 2001 when Argentina went into a terminal crisis. In his sermons, he used to openly condemn the social situation, even with former President Fernando de la Rua sitting right in front of him and hearing his Sunday Mass.

It was in August 2001 when he submitted a document known as “Episcopal Conference of Argentina”, where the Church indicated its stance on the delicate situation the country was going through.

The document said that "some of the most serious social ills we suffer are a reflection of the raw liberalism.” Likewise, it indicated the State as “an instrument created to serve the common good, and to be the guarantor of equity and solidarity of the people.”

The communiqué also condemned the fact of not having created a “social network” in order to contain the expelled from the system. To conclude, it also remarked the existence of “two diseases: tax evasion and squandering of State funds, which are funds obtained with the sweat and sacrifice of the people.”

...

http://www.buenosairesherald.com/article/126381/against-liberalism-critic-of-the-imf-and-foreign-debt


"economic liberalism with no rules or controls whatsoever is one of the causes of the current economic crisis since it creates speculative financial markets, thus damaging the real economy, especially in weak countries." -- Archbishop Boroglio, now Pope Francis

Jorge Bergoglio, now Pope Francis: Against liberalism, critic of the IMF and foreign debt

Let me preface this, for anyone who reads this without the proper background, that liberalism here refers to the economics of private property and free trade. And private property, for anyone thinking that's their house and their car, is when the land, the means of production and transport (etc) are privately owned for an individual's or a corporation's benefit instead of belonging to the people for their benefit. I'm not saying Pope Francis is a Socialist, but he doesn't sound like much a capitalist either.

This article is very badly written. You can tell it's written by a Spanish speaker but it still makes perfect sense. And the document can't possibly be called “Episcopal Conference of Argentina”, that sounds more like the authorship heading.


Against liberalism, critic of the IMF and foreign debt

By Carlos Burgueño
Ambito Financiero staff

Harsh critic of free-market liberalism, the IMF and adjustment policies, and defender of the debt restructuring processes, Jorge Bergoglio, now Pope Francis, never refused to define where he stands when it comes down to economics, even in the most difficult moments. Adept to the most classical conceptions of the Social Doctrine of the Church, he openly confronted adjustment policies during the 2001 crisis, and then, in 2011, he battled those same remedies when intended to solve debt problems in Europe.

Bergoglio took an active stance against liberal policies since his early years, but it became public in 2001 when Argentina went into a terminal crisis. In his sermons, he used to openly condemn the social situation, even with former President Fernando de la Rua sitting right in front of him and hearing his Sunday Mass.

It was in August 2001 when he submitted a document known as “Episcopal Conference of Argentina”, where the Church indicated its stance on the delicate situation the country was going through.

The document said that "some of the most serious social ills we suffer are a reflection of the raw liberalism.” Likewise, it indicated the State as “an instrument created to serve the common good, and to be the guarantor of equity and solidarity of the people.”

The communiqué also condemned the fact of not having created a “social network” in order to contain the expelled from the system. To conclude, it also remarked the existence of “two diseases: tax evasion and squandering of State funds, which are funds obtained with the sweat and sacrifice of the people.”

...

http://www.buenosairesherald.com/article/126381/against-liberalism-critic-of-the-imf-and-foreign-debt


"economic liberalism with no rules or controls whatsoever is one of the causes of the current economic crisis since it creates speculative financial markets, thus damaging the real economy, especially in weak countries." -- Archbishop Boroglio, now Pope Francis

Bergoglio (Pope Francis) on the sexual trafficking of young women, child homelessness, sweatshops

Since this is what I do now, Pope Francis just scored major points with me.

The first points he scored are for being vehemently opposed to globalization, neoliberalism, the IMF, the World Bank as instruments of misery, destruction and death and now these words from a mass he said for Society's Victims in 2011.


"In this city, there are many girls who stop playing with dolls to enter the dump of a brothel because they were kidnapped, sold and trafficked. Today we've come to pray for the victims of human trafficking, slave labor trafficking, sexual trafficking for prostitution... Contrary to what we're taught in school, slavery has not been abolished.

"You know what that is? A fairy tale! In this city, slavery is the order of the day in various forms, in this city workers are exploited in sweatshops and, if they're immigrants, they have no way out. In this city, there are kids who've lived on the streets for years. I don't know if the number is more or less, but there are many, and the city failed and continues to fail in any attempt to free them from this structural slavery of homelessness ".

...

"In this city, women and girls are kidnapped and subjected to the use and abuse of their body; they are destroyed in their dignity. The human flesh that Jesus assumed and for which He died is worth less than the flesh of a house-pet. We take better care of a dog than these slaves ours who we kick, who we destroy. I spent a couple of hours with the mother of Marita Verón, who was kidnapped by traffickers and sent to work in brothels. They managed to free 129 other girls, but her daughter still hasn't been found yet" Bergoglio recalled in his homily yesterday.

...

Translated from http://www.lanacion.com.ar/1408890-hay-una-anestesia-en-esta-ciudad-que-se-llama-coima




In 2008, on the Holy Thursday, Cardinal Jorge Mario Bergoglio(Pope Francis) washed the feet of 12 recovering drug addicts at a rehabilitation center in Buenos Aires, Argentina(in this Pic).

As Cardinal Jorge Mario Bergoglio, in 2001, he visited a hospice to kiss and wash the feet of 12 AIDS patients.

A Song for Hugo Chavez - By Winona LaDuke

A Song for Hugo Chavez
Friday, 15 March 2013 12:47
By Winona LaDuke, Indian Country Today Media Network

...

I was a great admirer of Hugo Chavez, thankful for his generosity, his courage, his leadership, and his commitment to Indigenous peoples.

My first memory of Venezuela, being an American educated child, was dim. But, I do remember pictures of Native people in the Venezuelan jungle being gunned down, and hanging like deer from trees- the result of gold prospecting in their territories. The year was 1977. That is a stark image- one where humans are treated like game animals, and I have never forgotten it.

...

At a 2005 Congressional hearing , oil executives were being chastised because corporate earnings were matched with dire conditions in many communities. Exxon Mobil, Chevron, ConocoPhillips, BP and Royal Dutch/Shell reported total earnings last quarter of nearly $33 billion. In the meantime, many Americans were facing fuel poverty, absolute hardship about keeping their houses warm. Twelve U.S. Senators asked oil companies to donate some of their record-setting profits to people in need.

Citgo was the only company to respond. Citgo Petroleum, joined with Citizens Energy under the leadership of Joseph Kennedy and began distribution of fuel oil from the Bronx and Brooklyn to the Alaskan Sub Arctic. Our reservation was included. Our first year, we received roughly $l.7 million in fuel assistance, and this continued for six years since. Each year, tribes in northern Minnesota, North Dakota and elsewhere have benefitted from the largesse of the Venezuelan government owned Citgo Petroleum Corp. As the price of fuel went up, 240 tribal communities received hundreds of millions of dollars of fuel assistance as fuel prices skyrocketed.

Some politicians encouraged our tribes to turn down the money, but Wayne Bonne of the Fond du Lac tribe, commented, "to us, it would be a foolish move. We're not a wealthy tribe," Bohn said. "We could make a political statement, but making a political statement while your people freeze is not very wise."

...

http://www.truth-out.org/speakout/item/15145-a-song-for-hugo-chavez
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