HomeLatest ThreadsGreatest ThreadsForums & GroupsMy SubscriptionsMy Posts
DU Home » Latest Threads » grantcart » Journal
Page: « Prev 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 ... 23 Next »

grantcart

Profile Information

Member since: Sat Jan 5, 2008, 08:45 PM
Number of posts: 42,376

Journal Archives

Find something to be happy about today (Sunday, Januarty 12th, 2014)

Yep still need a little happy in the morning, so on we go thinking about friends
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
sometimes sticks are a friend



and sometimes its just a 'bug' in your ear.



sometimes they may look funny, but they still have a lot in common



you just never know who is going to give you a kiss on the cheek



Have a great day, friend!!

Find something to be happy about today (Saturday, January 11th, 2014)

.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
Out of chaos gas is transformed and a new star is born



time goes by and new life is made



and a new song is sung



And we are lucky because we are the first generation to be able to see the whole process from chaos to a child's song!

Find something to be happy about today (Friday, January 10th, 2014)

Old friends don't go away, they are just down the road and won't answer the damn phone
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.








Have a great day today.

5 Reasons Rachel Maddow is the best news personality on TV now.

1) Story Selection.

Even if you like other anchors (and there are few too choose from) they inevitably are answering stories already in the mix. I am always interested in what Lawrence O'Donnell and Chris Hayes have to say but they are, more often than not, responding to items already in the media. When you watch Rachel you can watch an entire show that is either of completely fresh material or an angle on a big story that is so refreshingly different that it takes on new life.

It is no accident that Rachel was the one that took what seemed like a lame local story and made it into a national story. She is the most intellectually ambitious the entire bunch.

2) Story Framing

Perhaps her strongest suit is that she frames the story with meticulous detail and fairness. The bridge story is a classic example and at every point she didn't raise the volume beyond the facts, always saying "This may be nothing but . . .".

She also makes sure that the story has the maximum presentation of relevant facts possible. What is known is reported and what is trivial is mentioned in passing.

3) She is fair

At every point she welcomes the people involved to come on the air and set her straight, and a couple of times they have taken her up on it. The reason that people don't come on her show isn't because she isn't courteous (please see #4) but because she is so well informed and know they can't snowball her. She doesn't pick out one fact out of context and over animate it.

4) She is personable

When she has guests on she engages them. If they are diametrically opposed to her obvious position she still treats them with courtesy and respect. It would be hard pressed to find anyone who is more civil in the most aggravating circumstances and she always is willing to put herself on the line by inviting the most disagreeable people on her show.

5) She loves her job

Sometimes she is going over very wonky statistical material with tedious policy implications, and yet she loves doing what she does. If you aren't taken in by the story you simply cannot resist the allure of a smart confident woman who is not only competent but also completely engaged and enjoying her life.

You just have to love Rachel and the work she does, she is just irresistible.

Damn Christians!



I also found these thoughtful comments by Peter O'Toole which only endeared him more to me than before:



http://www.nytimes.com/2007/07/26/arts/television/26tudo.html?_r=0&adxnnl=1&adxnnlx=1388517722-0FqqzS/MYVTopGNbCQMByQ

“I am a retired Christian,” he announced playfully, relaxing in his trailer at the end of a hard workday. His costume had been replaced by sweater, jacket, pants and an ascot.

Six decades after his altar-boy childhood and subsequent loss of faith, Mr. O’Toole said he looked elsewhere for life guidance. “I suggest that an education and reading and facts aren’t bad things on which to ponder a few notions,” he said. But he acknowledged a “very strong and very real” spiritual side to his nature.

“No one can take Jesus away from me,” he said, having just expressed an affection for the Sermon on the Mount (“Blessed are the meek,” etc.). “There’s no doubt there was a historical figure of tremendous importance, with enormous notions. Such as peace.”



Reminds me somewhat of the thoughts of the great Albert Schweitzer

Fox News was right there are cases of serious voter fraud that need investigation.

Or at least one:






Liz Cheney’s husband has been registered to vote in both Virginia and Wyoming for the past nine months, even though he signed a document in Wyoming saying he was not registered elsewhere.

Responding to questions from POLITICO, a spokeswoman for the Republican Senate candidate said Phil Perry has notified Virginia authorities to take his name off the rolls but would not say when.

Perry, who continues to practice law in Washington while his wife challenges Sen. Mike Enzi in a Republican primary 2,000 miles west, registered as a Wyoming voter with the Teton County clerk’s office in March.

The county clerk, Sherry Daigle, said new voters are asked if they are registered elsewhere so the office can send a withdrawal request to the other jurisdiction.

“He signed an oath saying he was not currently registered anywhere else,” Daigle told POLITICO.





Read more: http://www.politico.com/story/2013/12/wyoming-senate-race-2014-liz-cheney-husband-phil-perry-vote-registration-101298.html#ixzz2ntyma6Fr


Find something to be happy about today (Monday December 16th, 2013)

Whose birthday are we celebrating today?
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
Hint #1




Hint #2





Did you guess Ludwig van Beethoven?

Well he was born on December 16, 1770 and would be a good candidate for us "Good Newsers" to remember. We often find good news in the midst of tragedy, people overcoming terrible circumstances to rediscover the joy of life and Beethoven suffered terrible tinnitus (something that I am an expert at, unfortunately) which creates sounds in the ear sometimes called "ringing in the ear" but would be better understood as "train whistle in the ear" making it impossible to hear his own music and driving him to consider suicide:





Around 1796, by the age of 26, Beethoven began to lose his hearing. He suffered from a severe form of tinnitus, a "ringing" in his ears that made it hard for him to hear music; he also tried to avoid conversations. The cause of Beethoven's deafness is unknown, but it has variously been attributed to typhus, auto-immune disorders (such as systemic lupus erythematosus), and even his habit of immersing his head in cold water to stay awake. The explanation from Beethoven's autopsy was that he had a "distended inner ear," which developed lesions over time.

As early as 1801, Beethoven wrote to friends describing his symptoms and the difficulties they caused in both professional and social settings (although it is likely some of his close friends were already aware of the problems). Beethoven, on the advice of his doctor, lived in the small Austrian town of Heiligenstadt, just outside Vienna, from April to October 1802 in an attempt to come to terms with his condition. There he wrote his Heiligenstadt Testament, a letter to his brothers which records his thoughts of suicide due to his growing deafness and records his resolution to continue living for and through his art. Over time, his hearing loss became profound: there is a well-attested story that, at the end of the premiere of his Ninth Symphony, he had to be turned around to see the tumultuous applause of the audience; hearing nothing, he wept



Beethoven would be an apt poster child for those of us who struggle against tedium, banality, pain and angst to find the joy of the day because he fought back from all of that to create music that still grabs your emotions today.

But no silly rabbit today we celebrate the birth of my oldest daughter whose middle name is Hataichanok which in Thai is translated as "heart of the father". I always look up Beethoven's birthday at the beginning of December to make sure I don't muff the day.

Find some joy in your life today, friend.

Find something to be happy about today (Tuesday Dec 3, 2013)

Waiting for the big guy to go to rehab
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.

feeling old? We can still make a difference by teaching a skill.



Or just providing a challenging highway for play.



We all got something that will help some one else, have a great day.

Find something to be happy about today (Monday Dec 2, 2013)

.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.

.
.
.
.
.
.
.

Siblings helping siblings




Sometimes when we need someone to help us walk down the road



Sometimes when we grow old with special challenges




And all of the other times that life makes us stand alone feeling stupid. Party (Left) has a rare disease that causes regularly vomiting and his sister Fiesta helps clean it up.


Have a great day and if you want to really confuse someone treat them like a long lost sibling and watch how it confounds and confuses them!!!!

And remember this tip from our favorite Dane:


"Above all do not forget your duty to love yourself."

Soren Kierkegaard



Find something to be happy about today (Sunday Dec 1, 2013)

.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.


Today feast on these beautiful paintings





Now meet the artists:

.
.
.
.
.

.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.






http://www.nytimes.com/2005/12/18/books/review/18grandin.html?_r=0

This is a wonderful book for parents to read to young children. It tells the true story of elephants trained to make paintings. "I teach in two schools," Katya Arnold writes. "One is in the city. The other is in the jungle. Some of my students have hands. Others have trunks."

. . .

Many of the elephants make aimless drawings, but it seemed to me that a few are creating real patterns. Not only that - an elephant named Gongkam had painted highly realistic pictures of various flowers; one bunch with long stems looked like irises. Another elephant, Larnkam, had made both flowers and swirling abstract designs; several looked a bit like intertwined double helixes. These were in contrast to the art I saw on a couple of other Web sites, done by elephants in zoos, where almost all the work looked like scribbling. It is interesting that the best elephant artists seem to be young, only 4 or 5 years old; it's likely that many zoo animals are much older and it may be more difficult for them to learn.



Still skeptical? Watch this video:



http://www.elephantart.com/catalog/

Have a great day, let your inner elephant out and do something no one expects you will be able to do!!






“Life can only be understood backwards; but it must be lived forwards.”



Søren Kierkegaard
Go to Page: « Prev 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 ... 23 Next »