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friendly_iconoclast

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Member since: Fri Sep 8, 2006, 11:47 AM
Number of posts: 14,804

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If you're going to appeal to authority in your fight against guns...

...to wit, Warren Burger (the first link is merely the latest example of same):

"Chief Justice Warren Burger on the 2nd Amendment"

http://www.democraticunderground.com/12626815

as well as:

http://www.democraticunderground.com/10022147913

http://www.democraticunderground.com/1172146191

http://www.democraticunderground.com/1172137826

...do you accept their authority on other issues as well?

Bowers v Hardwick


http://www.law.cornell.edu/supremecourt/text/478/186#writing-USSC_CR_0478_0186_ZC

Concurrence

BURGER, C.J., Concurring Opinion

CHIEF JUSTICE BURGER, concurring.

I join the Court's opinion, but I write separately to underscore my view that, in constitutional terms, there is no such thing as a fundamental right to commit homosexual sodomy.

As the Court notes, ante at 192, the proscriptions against sodomy have very "ancient roots." Decisions of individuals relating to homosexual conduct have been subject to state intervention throughout the history of Western civilization. Condemnation of those practices is firmly rooted in Judeo-Christian moral and ethical standards. Homosexual sodomy was a capital crime under Roman law. See Code Theod. 9.7.6; Code Just. 9.9.31. See also D. Bailey, Homosexuality [p197] and the Western Christian Tradition 70-81 (1975). During the English Reformation, when powers of the ecclesiastical courts were transferred to the King's Courts, the first English statute criminalizing sodomy was passed. 25 Hen. VIII, ch. 6. Blackstone described "the infamous crime against nature" as an offense of "deeper malignity" than rape, a heinous act "the very mention of which is a disgrace to human nature," and "a crime not fit to be named." 4 W. Blackstone, Commentaries *215. The common law of England, including its prohibition of sodomy, became the received law of Georgia and the other Colonies. In 1816, the Georgia Legislature passed the statute at issue here, and that statute has been continuously in force in one form or another since that time. To hold that the act of homosexual sodomy is somehow protected as a fundamental right would be to cast aside millennia of moral teaching.

This is essentially not a question of personal "preferences," but rather of the legislative authority of the State. I find nothing in the Constitution depriving a State of the power to enact the statute challenged here.


Automatically proclaiming the validity of an opinion because Someone Important
Said It is intellectually lazy, morally bankrupt, or both. I leave it to the reader to
determine which of these apply in the linked threads...





Posted by friendly_iconoclast | Sun Jun 22, 2014, 05:56 PM (13 replies)

Internal Police Emails Show Efforts to Hide Use of Cell Phone Tracking

Source: ACLU

Internal Police Emails Show Efforts to Hide Use of Cell Phone Tracking
06/19/2014

By Maria Kayanan, Associate Legal Director, ACLU of Florida at 9:01pm

As we suspected, local law enforcement officials are borrowing cell phone tracking devices known as “stingrays” from the U.S. Marshals Service – and police are deliberately concealing the use of stingrays in court documents submitted to judges in criminal investigations.

The ACLU of Florida is releasing a set of internal police emails obtained through a public records request with the subject line “Trap and Trace Confidentiality”. The documents confirm that local police, working on state court matters, hide behind the sham cloak of the U.S. Marshals’ office to keep the information about stingray use out of court files – and beyond even a court’s custody and reach.

In the email exchange, a Sarasota Police Department sergeant says that in warrant application to a judge, a North Port Police Department detective had “specifically outlined the investigative means used to locate the suspect,” and the sergeant asked that the detective “submit a new PCA [probable cause affidavit] and seal the old one.” In other words, fix the old affidavit and keep the use of the stingray equipment secret.

The sergeant also says, “In the past, and at the request of the U.S. Marshalls [sic], the investigative means utilized to locate the suspect have not been revealed so that we may continue to utilize this technology without the knowledge of the criminal element. In reports or depositions we simply refer to the assistance as ‘received information from a confidential source regarding the location of the suspect.’ To date this has not been challenged…”

Read more: https://www.aclu.org/blog/national-security-technology-and-liberty/internal-police-emails-show-efforts-hide-use-cell



Remember, citizen: It's better for society that you don't know what surveillance
techniques are being used by law enforcement. Fourth Amendment? HA!

(from the link in the above excerpt)

https://www.aclu.org/sites/default/files/assets/aclu_florida_stingray_police_emails.pdf

I just received a phone call from one of our detectives (Tom Laughlin) who is assigned to the U.S.
Marshalls Task Force out of Tampa. He received a call from the ASA Craig Schaefer regarding some
concerns. Schaefer advised him that they received a PCA regarding a NorthPortPD Case 09-031066
in where the detective specifically outlined the investigative means used to locate the suspect. As you are aware for some time now, the US Marshalls and I believe FDLE have had equipment which enables law enforcement to ping a suspects cell phone and pin point his/her exact location in an effort to apprehend suspects involved in serious crimes. In the past, and at the request of the U.S. Marshalls, the investigative means utilized to locate the suspect have not been revealed so that we may continue to utilize this technology without the knowledge of the criminal element. In reports or depositions we simply refer to the assistance as " received information from a confidential source regarding the location of the suspect." To date this has not been challenged, since it is not an integral part of the actual crime that occurred.

The ASA was not sure what agency your Detective Sinehth used that had the equipment that enabled him/her to locate his suspect. They were concerned as we all are, that by providing these specifics on a PCA, could jeopardize future investigations attempting to locate fugitives. The Tampa Office of the US Marshalls was not involved in the case, and they are not aware of who was. If this is in fact one of your cases, could you please entertain either having the Detective submit a new PCA and seal the old one, or at minimum instruct the detectives for future cases, regarding the fact that it is unnecessary to provide investigative means to anyone outside of law enforcement , especially in a public document. Please note that I am passing information on to you, and I have not been able to confirm that the case or detective are affiliated with NPPD


"Most open...", my ass!
Posted by friendly_iconoclast | Fri Jun 20, 2014, 12:52 AM (9 replies)

The peril of hipster economics

http://www.aljazeera.com/indepth/opinion/2014/05/peril-hipster-economics-2014527105521158885.html

The peril of hipster economics
When urban decay becomes a set piece to be remodelled or romanticised.

Last updated: 28 May 2014 08:03
Sarah Kendzior

On May 16, an artist, a railway service and a government agency spent $291,978 to block poverty from the public eye.

Called psychylustro, German artist Katharina Grosse's project is a large-scale work designed to distract Amtrak train riders from the dilapidated buildings and fallen factories of north Philadelphia. The city has a 28 percent poverty rate - the highest of any major US city - with much of it concentrated in the north. In some north Philadelphia elementary schools, nearly every child is living below the poverty line.

Grosse partnered with the National Endowment of the Arts and Amtrak to mask North Philadelphia's hardship with a delightful view. The Wall Street Journal calls this "Fighting Urban Blight With Art". Liz Thomas, the curator of the project, calls it "an experience that asks people to think about this space that they hurtle through every day".

The project is not actually fighting blight, of course - only the ability of Amtrak customers to see it...


Aaargh...
Posted by friendly_iconoclast | Thu Jun 12, 2014, 10:49 PM (0 replies)

It's already been held to be a *bad* thing, if true, on this thread:

Bad for 'progress' on guns, dontcha know...

I'll repost the decidedly malodorous post in full, on the slim chance the poster regains a
residual sense of shame and self-deletes or edits it (the particularly repellent bit
is highlighted):

http://www.democraticunderground.com/10025067601#post7

Response to pnwmom (Original post)

Schema Thing (9,226 posts) Sun Jun 8, 2014, 11:12 PM
7. Your conclusion does not follow from the paragraphs you quoted

It's possible, but definitely not inferred by the text. Almost the opposite is inferred, ie: a citizen may have shot and injured one of the two bad guys. I hope not, because that is the last thing we need to make progress wrt guns, but hope does not change the text quoted above.
Posted by friendly_iconoclast | Sun Jun 8, 2014, 11:55 PM (1 replies)

U.S. Marshals Seize Cops’ Spying Records to Keep Them From the ACLU

More transperancy...

http://www.wired.com/2014/06/feds-seize-stingray-documents/


U.S. Marshals Seize Cops’ Spying Records to Keep Them From the ACLU

By Kim Zetter
06.03.14 | 6:15 pm

A routine request in Florida for public records regarding the use of a surveillance tool known as stingray took an extraordinary turn recently when federal authorities seized the documents before police could release them.

The surprise move by the U.S. Marshals Service stunned the American Civil Liberties Union, which earlier this year filed the public records request with the Sarasota, Florida, police department for information detailing its use of the controversial surveillance tool.

The ACLU had an appointment last Tuesday to review documents pertaining to a case investigated by a Sarasota police detective. But marshals swooped in at the last minute to grab the records, claiming they belong to the U.S. Marshals Service and barring the police from releasing them.

ACLU staff attorney Nathan Freed Wessler called the move “truly extraordinary and beyond the worst transparency violations” the group has seen regarding documents detailing police use of the technology.


The original post from the ACLU:

https://www.aclu.org/blog/national-security-technology-and-liberty/us-marshals-seize-local-cops-cell-phone-tracking-files

U.S. Marshals Seize Local Cops’ Cell Phone Tracking Files in Extraordinary Attempt to Keep Information From Public
06/03/2014

Government Secrecy
By Nathan Freed Wessler, Staff Attorney, ACLU Speech, Privacy & Technology Project at 12:13pm

...RED FLAG #1: The Sarasota Police initially told us that they had responsive records, including applications filed by and orders issued to a local detective under the state “trap and trace” statute that he had relied on for authorization to conduct stingray surveillance. That raised the first red flag, since trap and trace orders are typically used to gather limited information about the phone numbers of incoming calls, not to track cell phones inside private spaces or conduct dragnet surveillance. And, such orders require a very low legal standard. As one federal magistrate judge has held, police should be permitted to use stingrays only after obtaining a probable cause warrant, if at all.

RED FLAG #2: The Sarasota Police set up an appointment for us to inspect the applications and orders, as required by Florida law. But a few hours before that appointment, an assistant city attorney sent an email cancelling the meeting on the basis that the U.S. Marshals Service was claiming the records as their own and instructing the local cops not to release them. Their explanation: the Marshals Service had deputized the local officer, and therefore the records were actually the property of the federal government.

We emphatically disagree, since the Sarasota detective created the applications, brought them to court, and retained the applications and orders in his files. Merely giving him a second title (“Special Deputy U.S. Marshal”) does not change these facts. But regardless, once the Sarasota Police Department received our records request, state law required them to hold onto the records for at least 30 days, to give us an opportunity to go to court and seek an order for release of the documents.

Instead of complying with that clear legal obligation, the local police allowed the records to disappear by letting the U.S. Marshals drive down from their office in Tampa, seize the physical files, and move them to an unknown location. We’ve seen our fair share of federal government attempts to keep records about stingrays secret, but we’ve never seen an actual physical raid on state records in order to conceal them from public view.
Posted by friendly_iconoclast | Thu Jun 5, 2014, 12:59 PM (0 replies)

U.S. Marshals Seize Cops’ Spying Records to Keep Them From the ACLU

http://www.wired.com/2014/06/feds-seize-stingray-documents/


U.S. Marshals Seize Cops’ Spying Records to Keep Them From the ACLU

By Kim Zetter
06.03.14 | 6:15 pm

A routine request in Florida for public records regarding the use of a surveillance tool known as stingray took an extraordinary turn recently when federal authorities seized the documents before police could release them.

The surprise move by the U.S. Marshals Service stunned the American Civil Liberties Union, which earlier this year filed the public records request with the Sarasota, Florida, police department for information detailing its use of the controversial surveillance tool.

The ACLU had an appointment last Tuesday to review documents pertaining to a case investigated by a Sarasota police detective. But marshals swooped in at the last minute to grab the records, claiming they belong to the U.S. Marshals Service and barring the police from releasing them.

ACLU staff attorney Nathan Freed Wessler called the move “truly extraordinary and beyond the worst transparency violations” the group has seen regarding documents detailing police use of the technology.


The original post from the ACLU:

https://www.aclu.org/blog/national-security-technology-and-liberty/us-marshals-seize-local-cops-cell-phone-tracking-files

U.S. Marshals Seize Local Cops’ Cell Phone Tracking Files in Extraordinary Attempt to Keep Information From Public
06/03/2014

Government Secrecy
By Nathan Freed Wessler, Staff Attorney, ACLU Speech, Privacy & Technology Project at 12:13pm

...RED FLAG #1: The Sarasota Police initially told us that they had responsive records, including applications filed by and orders issued to a local detective under the state “trap and trace” statute that he had relied on for authorization to conduct stingray surveillance. That raised the first red flag, since trap and trace orders are typically used to gather limited information about the phone numbers of incoming calls, not to track cell phones inside private spaces or conduct dragnet surveillance. And, such orders require a very low legal standard. As one federal magistrate judge has held, police should be permitted to use stingrays only after obtaining a probable cause warrant, if at all.

RED FLAG #2: The Sarasota Police set up an appointment for us to inspect the applications and orders, as required by Florida law. But a few hours before that appointment, an assistant city attorney sent an email cancelling the meeting on the basis that the U.S. Marshals Service was claiming the records as their own and instructing the local cops not to release them. Their explanation: the Marshals Service had deputized the local officer, and therefore the records were actually the property of the federal government.

We emphatically disagree, since the Sarasota detective created the applications, brought them to court, and retained the applications and orders in his files. Merely giving him a second title (“Special Deputy U.S. Marshal”) does not change these facts. But regardless, once the Sarasota Police Department received our records request, state law required them to hold onto the records for at least 30 days, to give us an opportunity to go to court and seek an order for release of the documents.

Instead of complying with that clear legal obligation, the local police allowed the records to disappear by letting the U.S. Marshals drive down from their office in Tampa, seize the physical files, and move them to an unknown location. We’ve seen our fair share of federal government attempts to keep records about stingrays secret, but we’ve never seen an actual physical raid on state records in order to conceal them from public view.
Posted by friendly_iconoclast | Thu Jun 5, 2014, 12:56 PM (0 replies)
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