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Mme. Defarge

Mme. Defarge's Journal
Mme. Defarge's Journal
January 13, 2023

Portland may be making a comeback!



Preventing catastrophe and crafting cat calendars. That's the Portland Army Corps of Engineers.
by: Amanda Arden
Posted: Jan 13, 2023 / 08:00 AM PST
Updated: Jan 13, 2023 / 11:44 AM PST
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PORTLAND, Ore. (KOIN) – Engineering — it’s not something that draws massive engagement on social media. But cats? Cats will get clicks.

Chris Gaylord, a public affairs specialist with the Portland District of the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers learned this back in 2021 when he was managing the government agency’s Facebook page.

He and his coworkers photoshopped images of cats onto Oregon infrastructure and engineering equipment for National Cat Day and it was a huge success.

So, in the fall of 2022, Gaylord thought, why not make a calendar out of those images?

“It was to spotlight our projects, spotlight our infrastructure, give people kind of an introduction to some of the different things that our organization does, some of the ways that we add value to the Pacific Northwest, but in a fun way,” he explained.

The free calendar was published in November 2022 and anyone can download it from the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers’ digital library.

https://www.koin.com/news/oregon/army-corps-of-engineers-in-portland-makes-infrastructure-cool-with-cats/?utm_source=koin_app&utm_medium=social&utm_content=share-link

January 10, 2023

This helped calm my nerves on the GOP's debt ceiling threat.

How the Biden administration can slow the GOP’s dangerous schemes

https://www.washingtonpost.com/opinions/2023/01/10/house-republicans-rules-package-biden/?pwapi_token=eyJ0eXAiOiJKV1QiLCJhbGciOiJIUzI1NiJ9.eyJzdWJpZCI6IjEwNjYzNDExIiwicmVhc29uIjoiZ2lmdCIsIm5iZiI6MTY3MzM3MDE1NywiaXNzIjoic3Vic2NyaXB0aW9ucyIsImV4cCI6MTY3NDU3OTc1NywiaWF0IjoxNjczMzcwMTU3LCJqdGkiOiIxOTY4MmMwMy04ZmM2LTRhZTgtODlmOS00ZmY1OTJkMDJmNGEiLCJ1cmwiOiJodHRwczovL3d3dy53YXNoaW5ndG9ucG9zdC5jb20vb3BpbmlvbnMvMjAyMy8wMS8xMC9ob3VzZS1yZXB1YmxpY2Fucy1ydWxlcy1wYWNrYWdlLWJpZGVuLyJ9.AfGvvoQBRFh8h1Z0QIoxSO8v0_VuoIRSxDsI6d2zzZM

The rules package that House Republicans passed Monday night provides an indication of just how much damage House Speaker Kevin McCarthy (R-Calif.) has wrought in capitulating to the most extreme members of his caucus. The good news is that the Biden administration can thwart McCarthy’s schemes.

For starters, the House GOP is spoiling for a fight on the debt limit. The rules package eliminates a long-existing parliamentary rule that automatically raised the debt ceiling whenever the House passed a budget. This will empower the House to hold the economy hostage to extract dangerous cuts to national security and crippling reductions in entitlements.
But the White House can defuse the extortionists’ bomb before it is detonated. It should plainly state that the president has the power to ensure Congress does not sabotage the full faith and credit of the United States.

Section 8 of Article I of the Constitution states that Congress has the power “to lay and collect taxes, duties, imposts and excises, to pay the debts.” It further states that Congress has the power to borrow “on the credit” of the United States. Plainly, the Founding Fathers did not envision lawmakers deliberately refusing payment of debts and destroying the credit of the United States.

But the 14th Amendment makes clear that this power does not include the power to trigger a default. As constitutional scholar Laurence H. Tribe succinctly tweeted, “The debt ceiling is a misnomer: it does nothing to cap spending but just creates an illusory threat to stiff our creditors.” That’s because “[Section] 4 of 14th Amendment forbids defaulting on the nation’s debts.”

January 4, 2023

iPhone question

Awhile back I changed my Apple ID to my new email address and changed my password at the same time. Then something happened and my ID reverted back to my old, discontinued email. Since my password is hidden I’m not sure if it’s the old or new one, and I’m not even sure if I remember my old one. At first I wondered if my phone had been hacked but so much time has gone by without incident that I’m thinking my attempt to change my ID was simply unsuccessful.

Now, however, I really do want to make those changes but am afraid to try for fear of getting locked out of my phone since I can no longer access email sent to that old address.

Suggestions welcome!

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Member since: Tue Oct 18, 2005, 01:05 AM
Number of posts: 8,143
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