HomeLatest ThreadsGreatest ThreadsForums & GroupsMy SubscriptionsMy Posts
DU Home » Latest Threads » tecelote » Journal
Page: 1

tecelote

Profile Information

Member since: Fri Apr 15, 2005, 10:35 AM
Number of posts: 4,267

Journal Archives

In Northern Ontario, herbicides have indigenous people treading carefully and taking action

First Nations people are pressing Ottawa to halt glyphosate spraying that they say is endangering their traditional diet and way of life, Julien Gignac writes



When Raymond Owl hunts and forages for medicines in woodlands around his Northern Ontario First Nation, he routinely finds blistering, withered plants and seldom sees game. The forest is part of a tract of land sprayed with glyphosate, the active ingredient in an herbicide used to expedite the growth of coniferous trees after clear-cutting. And Mr. Owl argues the effects of the chemical impede traditions on which his culture hinges.

“You don’t want to take a chance on it,” he said. “If you go up the road here where they sprayed, everything is black, like a forest fire.”

------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Herbicides destroy the interdependent balance of all life, which is the core philosophy of the Anishinabek.
LETTER BY TRADITIONAL ECOLOGICAL KNOWLEDGE ELDERS GROUP


------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Not only does the forest near Sagamok Anishnawbek First Nation – about an hour’s drive southwest of Sudbury – yield fewer fruits, he said, but his people are reluctant to take from the bush in case the flora and fauna are contaminated. Mr. Owl refuses to harvest in these affected areas; and for roughly two decades, he’s noticed marked changes to the environment.

“If the forests weren’t sprayed, we would harvest as we please without any fear.”

Mr. Owl, 73, co-founded an organization called the Traditional Ecological Knowledge Elders Group (TEK) to protect a large swath of forest along the northern shore of Lake Huron between Sault Ste. Marie and Sudbury that totals about 5.1 million hectares. TEK says glyphosate is harming their traditional territories, ways of life and consequently infringing upon their vested rights as First Nation people.


Go to Page: 1