HomeLatest ThreadsGreatest ThreadsForums & GroupsMy SubscriptionsMy Posts
DU Home » Latest Threads » cpamomfromtexas » Journal
Page: 1

cpamomfromtexas

Profile Information

Member since: Tue Nov 16, 2004, 10:00 AM
Number of posts: 874

Journal Archives

Mr President, it's no secret why Bain is handling this Bankruptcy "Reorganization"

It is simple, union-busting 101. All the pilots want at American is pay and benefit restoration from a decade ago (when they took a minimum pay cut of 23%), adjusted for inflation. They are simply unwilling to once again carry the load for the entire airline's operation especially in light of management gaffes over the same time period, some of which I'll cover below. They didn't bat an eye when approximately $80 million was split amongst 2500 flight attendants that are willing to retire early. $75 million would bring pilots up to parity with Delta pay rates--so why no contract after over 6 years in negotiations under the National Mediation Board, and why haven't they been released to self-help under the Railway Labor Act (which by the way, is greatly tilted in favor of management since airline workers cannot strike because their contracts don't expire, they simply become amendable.) United pay rates are almost complete, but the NMB has forced a blackout on information contained in the contract-word has it that it is significantly better pay than Delta. Is your NMB trying to "help out" American's management by declaring the blackout?

Mr President, please ask Mr Hoglander of the NMB, why he told the union's board of directors that "No Major Airline would ever be released to self-help". It sort of proves my point that the Railway Labor Act should be abolished don't you think? The Act simply rewards management for foot dragging on a contract agreement. And while we are on the subject, why aren't airline worker's pensions protected like the railroad workers pensions? I'd sure like to know since my husband's pension is getting trashed this month.

I'm writing this to point out that if the pilots at American were treated properly, they would move heaven and earth to help the airline run properly. The problem is, when their enthusiasm to cover for others on the property runs low, nothing goes well at an airline. But I suppose everyone is starting to see that now.

This guy is the first media person to finally get why AA management is refusing to to the right thing and promptly and fairly settle the last contract and merge inside bankruptcy to being realizing the savings that the combined entity would create.

American Airlines Management Can Get A Huge Payday If It Avoids Merging With US Airways

http://www.slate.com/blogs/moneybox/2012/10/01/american_merger_with_us_airways_ceo_tom_horton_gets_a_huge_payday_if_it_can_be_avoided_.html


Make no mistake, AA management would run to the judge if they had a leg to stand on with regards to the alleged "sickout". The point is, they have no evidence but want to create a hostile work environment (as if it could get any worse), with the goal of weakening the pilots to take a substandard contract. So far it is working, many pilots who commute to work are doing so out of uniform since passengers are booing them, calling them "union thugs", etc. I'm sitting here wondering who will be stupid enough to harass my husband.

Read on to find out who the real thugs are, they are the management thugs who ran American Airlines into the ground and their Bain Capital friends who desperately want to outsource all flying.

Now consider these facts concerning AA's allegations of pilots abuse:

They just told one of the Union's Board of Directors he is to report for a hearing on "abuse of sick leave". He is recovering from radiation treatment for CANCER. Great employee relations, AA. How much do you pay for that?

AA is alleging that pilots are "slowing down" the operation for "last minute" frivolous maintenance issues. Now bear in mind, that pilots are licensed by the FAA and the FAA just fined American Airlines for multiple maintenance related safety violations over many years. See here:

http://www.tulsaworld.com/business/article.aspx?subjectid=45&articleid=20120808_45_E1_DALLAS933913

Largest two fines in aviation history totalling $186 million:

http://articles.latimes.com/2012/aug/08/business/la-fi-amr-fine-20120808
http://travel.usatoday.com/flights/post/2010/08/faa-fines-american-airlines-24m-for-safety-lapses-/109648/1

And letter from FAA to pilots:

http://aviationblog.dallasnews.com/2012/09/faa-to-american-airlines-pilots-yes-were-watching.html/


Now bear in mind, pilots do NOT GET PAID from 1 hour before scheduled takeoff also known as "sign-in" (even after contract abrogation where you'd logically think the Fair Labor standards Act would apply--yes, that is correct, the FLSA doesn't apply specifically to pilots) while they are inspecting the aircraft, nor do they get paid IF THERE IS A MAINTENANCE ISSUE MAKING THE PLANE LATE OR INOPERABLE (they only get paid if the aircraft is moving except when it is getting deiced now that their contract has been abrogated by the bankruptcy court). But they WILL LOSE THEIR LICENSE (AND THEIR LIVELIHOOD, POSSIBLY FOREVER) if they miss an item making the aircraft unsafe. Bear in mind the FAA is all over the place and they must exercise great care in not making mistakes. Not just for the passengers, but also for themselves. I can't tell you how many times over the years my husband would be gone 2 days and not make one red cent because the aircraft was delayed for maintenance then taken out of service completely the next day.

Now tell me, exactly what incentive do pilots have to slow down the operation? If their flight doesn't go, they won't make this month's mortgage because a single leg can affect their ENTIRE WEEK'S pay.

One of the issues that management keeps mentioning is "coffee pot" issues. The reason they do this is it sounds good, but just like all spinmeisters, the true facts don't back up their sound bytes upon further examination. Consider this: If the coffee pots don't work properly, leaks can occur that can interfere with proper operation of the flight, preventing safe egress at a minimum. Consider this incident investigation for a Qantas flight: A water leak in the galley of a Qantas 747 knocked out 3 of the 4 on-board power systems including all AC-powered systems, as the plane was on descent 25 kilometres from Bangkok airport, leaving pilots just minutes to land on battery power. Investigators found that if the flooding had occurred more than 30 minutes' flying time from an airport or had there been a delay in landing, it would have placed the plane carrying 346 passengers and 19 crew "at considerable risk" as more systems were likely to fail and the leak had already knocked out power to radar, cabin pressurisation, autopilot, auto-throttle and some fuel pumps as the plane descended from 21,000 feet and passed through 10,000 feet. Investigators found that the batteries, which were designed to last a minimum of 30 minutes before depletion, had been running for 21 minutes when the aircraft landed and taxied to the terminal building.

American Airlines has made serious cuts in both maintenance personnel and also has sold off spare parts in recent years to cut "costs" in its maintenance division courtesy of "Barbeque Bob" Redding, who aptly received his name from pilots because of maintenance deferrals which caused several airplanes to catch fire or have serious in flight issues which were averted only because of the skill of American Airlines pilots. If you wonder about Bob Redding, go google him and find out the prior airlines he trashed prior to arriving at American and executing the same song and dance. Maintenance issues for aircraft are just like sick people, if you wait too long to maintain them, you will pay dearly later.

Pilots are the last line of defense in the checks they make prior to departing on any flight. FAA mandates that ANY discrepancy be written up and dealt with prior to departing on any flight. Basically, the company is alleging that there is a problem if the pilots are "not looking the other way".

Here are the procedures from the flight manual:

General Operating Procedures 5.3-3

Flight Manual Part I

5.3.6 Responsibility

A. The Captain is responsible for all flight crewmember entries in the E6 logbook. Refer to the E-6 LOGBOOK ENTRY GUIDE in the front of the logbook for helpful guidance. The Captain may delegate writing entries in the E6 logbook, but no entry may be made without the Captain's prior knowledge and approval.

B. All discrepancies discovered by the flight crew will be entered in the E6 logbook by the flight crew whenever possible. The Captain will sign the logbook with name and employee number after the last discrepancy entered, regardless of whether the flight is a through flight or terminating flight. If no discrepancies are to be reported on leaving the aircraft, the Captain will enter No Items followed by name and employee number.

I have recently looked at the companies numbers for sick usage and there was a 4.94% sick as of 18 Sept 2011 and 7.46% as of 18 Sept 2012, and this is for the OLDEST group of pilots EVER in the history of aviation. Some of whom may have sped up surgeries or other issues, knowing full well the company may cancel their health insurance once the contract was abrogated by the bankruptcy judge. Now would you want to fly with a pilot that didn't have enough financial sense to handle a surgery now when his insurance might be cancelled in the next few weeks or his sick leave balance cleaned out completely under the blessings of a bankruptcy court?


Please support the pilots rights to protect themselves and you the flying passenger by supporting their rights to make sure everything is safe both with the aircraft and with their fitness to fly (which is also mandated by the FAA).

Mr President, if you want any more details and want to meet the people who can give you more information, I know you have people that can find me.

Signed,

Your Fan (but I'd be a bigger fan if you'd weigh in on this like you did the NFL Ref's contract).


Posted by cpamomfromtexas | Mon Oct 1, 2012, 03:55 PM (9 replies)

Once again, management is looking like clowns they are, check this out.

They just told one of the Union's Board of Directors he is to report for a hearing on "abuse of sick leave". He is recovering from radiation treatment for CANCER. Great employee relations, AA. How much do you pay for that?

AA is alleging that pilots are "slowing down" the operation for "last minute" frivolous maintenance issues. Now bear in mind, that pilots are licensed by the FAA and the FAA just fined American Airlines for multiple maintenance related safety violations. See here:

http://www.tulsaworld.com/business/article.aspx?subjectid=45&articleid=20120808_45_E1_DALLAS933913

Largest two fines in aviation history totalling $186 million:

http://articles.latimes.com/2012/aug/08/business/la-fi-amr-fine-20120808
http://travel.usatoday.com/flights/post/2010/08/faa-fines-american-airlines-24m-for-safety-lapses-/109648/1

And letter from FAA to pilots:

http://aviationblog.dallasnews.com/2012/09/faa-to-american-airlines-pilots-yes-were-watching.html/


Now bear in mind, pilots do NOT GET PAID (even after contract abrogation where you'd logically think the Fair Labor standards Act would apply--yes that is correct, the FLSA doesn't apply specifically to pilots) while they are inspecting the aircraft, nor do they get paid IF THERE IS A MAINTENANCE ISSUE MAKING THE PLANE LATE OR INOPERABLE (they only get paid if the aircraft is moving except when it is getting deiced now that their contract has been abrogated by the bankruptcy court). But they WILL LOSE THEIR LICENSE (AND THEIR LIVELIHOOD, POSSIBLY FOREVER) if they miss an item making the aircraft unsafe. Bear in mind the FAA is all over the place and they must exercise great care in not making mistakes. Not just for the passengers, but also for themselves.

One of the issues that management keeps mentioning is "coffee pot" issues. If the coffee pots don't work properly, leaks can occur that can interfere with proper operation of the flight, preventing safe egress at a minimum. Consider this incident investigation for a Qantas flight: A water leak in the galley of a Qantas 747 knocked out 3 of the 4 on-board power systems including all AC-powered systems, as the plane was on descent 25 kilometres from Bangkok airport, leaving pilots just minutes to land on battery power. Investigators found that if the flooding had occurred more than 30 minutes' flying time from an airport or had there been a delay in landing, it would have placed the plane carrying 346 passengers and 19 crew "at considerable risk" as more systems were likely to fail and the leak had already knocked out power to radar, cabin pressurisation, autopilot, auto-throttle and some fuel pumps as the plane descended from 21,000 feet and passed through 10,000 feet. Investigators found that the batteries, which were designed to last a minimum of 30 minutes before depletion, had been running for 21 minutes when the aircraft landed and taxied to the terminal building.

American Airlines has made serious cuts in both maintenance personnel and also has sold off spare parts in recent years to cut "costs" in its maintenance division courtesy of "Barbeque Bob" Redding, who aptly received his name from pilots because of maintenance deferrals which caused several airplanes to catch fire or have serious in flight issues which were averted only because of the skill of American Airlines pilots.

Pilots are the last line of defense in the checks they make prior to departing on any flight. FAA mandates that ANY discrepancy be written up and dealt with prior to departing on any flight. Basically, the company is alleging that there is a problem if the pilots are "not looking the other way".

Here are the procedures from the flight manual:

General Operating Procedures 5.3-3

Flight Manual Part I

5.3.6 Responsibility

A. The Captain is responsible for all flight crewmember entries in the E6 logbook. Refer to the E-6 LOGBOOK ENTRY GUIDE in the front of the logbook for helpful guidance. The Captain may delegate writing entries in the E6 logbook, but no entry may be made without the Captain's prior knowledge and approval.

B. All discrepancies discovered by the flight crew will be entered in the E6 logbook by the flight crew whenever possible. The Captain will sign the logbook with name and employee number after the last discrepancy entered, regardless of whether the flight is a through flight or terminating flight. If no discrepancies are to be reported on leaving the aircraft, the Captain will enter No Items followed by name and employee number.

I have recently looked at the companies numbers for sick usage and there was a 4.94% sick as of 18 Sept 2011 and 7.46% as of 18 Sept 2012, and this is for the OLDEST group of pilots EVER in the history of aviation. Some of whom may have sped up surgeries or other issues, knowing full well the company may cancel their health insurance once the contract was abrogated by the bankruptcy judge. Now would you want to fly with a pilot that didn't have enough financial sense to handle a surgery now when his insurance might be cancelled in the next few weeks or his sick leave balance cleaned out completely under the blessings of a bankruptcy court?


Please support the pilots rights to protect themselves and you the flying passenger by supporting their rights to make sure everything is safe both with the aircraft and with their fitness to fly (which is also mandated by the FAA).








Posted by cpamomfromtexas | Fri Sep 28, 2012, 02:13 PM (1 replies)

On the 9/11 anniversary, a small detail that is never mentioned.

American Airlines refused to pay the families of the pilots killed on 9/11 in accordance with Supplement Z of their contract.
Tell me again why anyone ever bothers to have a contract when you'll just get cheated anyway?

Please remember this as things heat up and a strike ensues.



SUPPLEMENT Z
SUPPLEMENTAL AGREEMENT
between
AMERICAN AIRLINES, INC.
and
THE AIR LINE PILOTS
in the service of
AMERICAN AIRLINES, INC.
as represented by
ALLIED PILOTS ASSOCIATION
BENEFITS IN THE EVENT OF
TERRORISM, SABOTAGE OR HOSTAGE
A. DEATH, PERMANENT TOTAL DISABILITY, AND DISMEMBERMENT BENEFITS
In the event of
(i) the death of a pilot, or
(ii) the permanent and total disability of a pilot, or
(iii) the loss by a pilot of sight of both eyes, or the loss of both hands,
or both feet, or one hand and one foot, or one hand and sight of
one eye, or one foot and sight of one eye,
resulting from injury or illness incurred during acts of terrorism or sabotage:
the Company shall pay or cause to be paid, subject to the conditions set forth in
C. and D. below, five hundred thousand dollars ($500,000) to such pilot if he is
alive, otherwise to his designated beneficiary under the Company's Group
Insurance Plan. "Permanent total disability" shall mean the complete inability of
the pilot to exercise his/her airmen certificate for at least one (1) year, and at the
end of said period, the expectation to be that the disability shall continue for the
remainder of the pilot's life. "Loss", with respect to hands and feet, shall mean
actual severance through or above the wrist or ankle joints; with respect to eyes,
shall mean entire and irrecoverable loss of sight. In the event the pilot becomes
eligible for benefits under more than one (l) of the eventualities cited above, the
maximum payment under this Section shall be five hundred thousand dollars
($500,000), and such benefits shall be in addition to the benefits provided in other
Company plans.
Posted by cpamomfromtexas | Tue Sep 11, 2012, 01:20 PM (4 replies)
Go to Page: 1