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d_r

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Member since: Thu Oct 28, 2004, 11:27 AM
Number of posts: 6,461

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The NRA ad

besides involving the kids, is stupid. They are trying to make the point that Obama doesn't support more armed guards in school, when part of today's announcement was:

- Give $150 million to school districts and law enforcement agencies to hire school resource officers, school psychologists, social workers, and counselors. This would put up to 1,000 new school resource officers - specially trained police officers who work in schools - and school counselors on the job.

US vs UK Violent crime rates

I'm going to start a new thread about this because I'm hoping to hear some smart folks interpret these data.

I had read on the internet that the UK had a higher violent crime rate than the US. I looked on Google and I think that statistic comes from this:
http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-25671/Violent-crime-worse-Britain-US.html

From that article:
"According to the figures released yesterday, 3.6 per cent of the population of England and Wales were victims of violent crime in 1999 - second only to Australia, where the figure was 4.1 per cent.

Scotland had a slightly lower rate of violence, at 3.4 per cent.

In the U.S., only 2 per cent of the population suffered an assault or robbery."


So that is almost double.

On this forum is a post (http://www.democraticunderground.com/10022168853) that shows a recent report from WHO that compares international death rates in terms of Health Data. From this chart-

http://sites.nationalacademies.org/DBASSE/CPOP/DBASSE_080393#violence

It shows that the US death rate from violence was a little over 6.47 per 100,000. In the UK the death rate from violence is 1.14 per 100,000. So that is about 5/6 times higher.

So, assuming that both of these reports are based on sound methodology - and there has to be a lot of error in these data, but assuming both are fairly accurate - and remembering that this are descriptive data, no inferences being drawn here, does one conclude:

Individuals are more likely to experience violent crime in the UK, but fatalities from violent crime are much higher in the US?

ETA and also, the first set of data are from 1999, the second from 2008, so there is a decade difference also.

OK I found a 12-year old Steubenville

I'm sure a lot of this is fiction - there are not guilty people in prison you know - but it is fascinating that it must have had some grounding in reality that things there have been whacked for a while-

http://www.innocentinmates.org/koniski/stat1.html

Here's the bullshit about the "cliff"

Happy 2013, Meet the new boss, all that.

Here's the thing.

When 2014 gets here and we have an election for congress. all these republican assholes will run commercial after commercial saying:

1. "I never voted to "raise" taxes"
2. "I voted for tax cuts for everyone making under $400K"

Nevermind the difference between $250K and $450K (how many people fall in that range anyway?). The real thing here is that the republicans wanted to be able to say that they did not vote to "raise" taxes on anyone (e.g., those making over $450K) because that will happen now that we are past midnight. Its a done deal, and they didn't vote to "raise" it. Now they will talk about how they are defenders of the middle class, because it is after midnight and the tax rate just went up, and they are going to vote to "bring it down" for the "middle class."

I'm sorry but we just got took.
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