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robertpaulsen

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Member since: Tue Oct 14, 2003, 04:09 AM
Number of posts: 8,142

Journal Archives

Spearfish Canyon, South Dakota - Beautiful Waterfalls!

This is the 4th vlog of our recent road trip. We were amazed by the natural wonder of Spearfish Canyon, South Dakota! Hope you enjoy what we captured.



Posted by robertpaulsen | Thu Jul 20, 2017, 01:06 PM (5 replies)

Close Encounters at Devils Tower National Monument Road Trip Day 3 Episode 3

Seeing Devils Tower is amazing. Neek, Sar and I experienced something other-worldly about seeing, in the midst of the rolling forest and hills, this humungous geological formation raised so tall above everything around it. Seriously, if you haven’t been, put this on your bucket list. It is like nothing else on Earth!

Posted by robertpaulsen | Fri Jul 14, 2017, 12:57 PM (8 replies)

Road Trip Utah to Wyoming Day 2 Episode 2: Wind Turbines and Hot Air Balloons

Neek, Sar and I woke up early in our hotel room in Midvale, Utah. It was 5:30am and I felt groggy after the long journey the day before, and strangely hungry. Fortunately the hotel breakfast room opened at 6am and they had waffles, which all three of us loved. We packed the car, checked out, and hit the open road again!



Posted by robertpaulsen | Thu Jul 6, 2017, 02:20 PM (1 replies)

Road Trip California to Utah Day 1 Episode 1 - We saw Bonnie & Clyde's Bullet-Riddled Car!

All road trips have to begin somewhere, and our recent road trip, in which we drove over 3,000 miles, began at 5am in the morning in Los Angeles. Our first day ended in Utah. Check out all the sights we saw along the way!



Posted by robertpaulsen | Thu Jun 29, 2017, 01:14 PM (17 replies)

Oldest Winery in Los Angeles Celebrates 100th Anniversary!

This is definitely the oldest operating winery in Los Angeles – the only one existing in L.A. to survive Prohibition - and now it is celebrating its 100th anniversary! Neek and I went to visit their beautiful location in downtown L.A. – they also have locations in Ontario and Paso Robles – to check out the tour that they offer at the San Antonio Winery.

Posted by robertpaulsen | Thu Jun 22, 2017, 01:00 PM (5 replies)

One of the Worlds Largest Artists Colony - The Brewery Complex in Downtown L.A.

Bi-annually in April and October, over 100 artists open their studios and living spaces and invite the public to see their world. The Brewery Arts Complex near downtown Los Angeles covers 16 acres (64749.70 m²) and is an industrially zoned space where only artists are allowed to live and work.

Posted by robertpaulsen | Thu Jun 15, 2017, 12:58 PM (19 replies)

Preserved Ruins Where the Treaty of Cahuenga was Signed in 1847

Right down the hill from Universal Studios, Hollywood is a preserved historic site that is probably one of the most important sites for California and the United States. Campo de Cahuenga was an adobe ranch house where the Treaty of Cahuenga (also known as “The Capitulation of Cahuenga”) was signed between Lieutenant Colonel John C. Fremont and General Andrés Pico on January 13, 1847, ending the fighting in the Mexican American War.

Posted by robertpaulsen | Fri Jun 9, 2017, 12:56 PM (3 replies)

This Changes Everything Should Mean Everything

Thursday, June 8, 2017

This Changes Everything Should Mean Everything

Several years ago, (six to be precise) I posted a column by Naomi Klein titled Capitalism vs. the Climate. It is a brilliant piece that was published in The Nation, and it was refreshing to read thoughtful research that explained to a mainstream, albeit left-leaning, audience the environmental and economic correlation between peak oil and global warming, i.e. the Carbon Crisis. I've been a fan of Klein ever since I read The Shock Doctrine so I was glad to see that in her research she had come to a lot of the same conclusions I had. She spelled out quite clearly that we cannot have an economy based on infinite growth when we're stuck on one planet with finite resources, that the Carbon Crisis has brought civilization to the point that in order to survive, "it demands a new civilizational paradigm." Klein even referenced the positive efforts of the Transition Town movement and warned of how Jevon's Paradox could undo the savings from energy efficiency if that savings is "simply plowed back into further exponential expansion of the economy, reduction in total emissions will be thwarted."







Naomi Klein, author of This Changes Everything Source: Wikimedia Commons


When I found out Klein was writing a book on climate change and capitalism, I was eager to read her further research. Not too eager; the hardcover edition of This Changes Everything: Capitalism vs. the Climate was published in 2014 and I waited until last year to read it when the paperback was on sale. My take on it? It is extremely well researched and well written. I would grade it as being a very good book, but for certain reasons I'll elaborate on later, it falls shy of being a great book. Klein does succeed in elaborating on the immediacy of our predicament and the necessity of the "new civilizational paradigm" mentioned in the initial column. As she writes on page 347, "We know that we are trapped within an economic system that has it backward; it behaves as if there is no end to what is actually finite (clean water, fossil fuels, and the atmospheric space to absorb their emissions) while insisting that there are strict and immovable limits to what is actually quite flexible: the financial resources that human institutions manufacture, and that, if imagined differently, could build the kind of caring society we need."

This Changes Everything is really good when it takes on the shortcomings of politicians and activists on both sides of the issue. It's pretty easy to tear apart the mindset of deniers, which Naomi Klein does with aplomb. But she is even more incisive in her critiques of so-called environmentalists that have grown cozy with Big Business, green billionaires like Richard Branson that talk a good game to the press, but don't always put their money where their mouth is, and anyone who thinks that carbon offsets constitutes a sound policy to stop global warming. To quote her on page 223: "The problem is that by adopting this model of financing, even the very best green projects are being made ineffective as climate responses because for every ton of carbon dioxide the developers keep out of the atmosphere, a corporation in the industrialized world is able to pump a ton into the air, using offsets to claim the pollution has been neutralized. One step forward, one step back. At best, we are running in place."

more at link...

http://americanjudas.blogspot.com/2017/06/this-changes-everything-should-mean.html
Posted by robertpaulsen | Thu Jun 8, 2017, 06:53 PM (7 replies)

One of the Longest Murals in the World The Great Wall of Los Angeles

One of the Longest Murals in the World – The Great Wall of Los Angeles

Walking along the Tujunga Wash concrete basin in the San Fernando Valley community of Valley Glen, Neek and I were impressed with the enormity of the mural painted on the 13 feet high concrete sides. This is The Great Wall of Los Angeles, one of the longest murals in the world at 2,754 feet (839.42 meters) in length, stretching over six city blocks! Officially titled The History of California, this amazing work of art reminded me thematically of the book A People’s History of the United States by Howard Zinn.

For those of you who have not read it, A People’s History of the United States is not just a history book; it is a rich tapestry of stories spotlighting groups of people often neglected in ‘official’ history books. Zinn covers the 200+ year history of the nation through the perspective of ethnic minorities, women, and the working poor. Some of these stories can be seen in The Great Wall of Los Angeles, which takes that same perspective, but focuses on California.

The visionary artist behind this is Judith Francisca Baca. A UCLA professor, activist and co-founder of The Social and Public Art Resource Center (SPARC), Baca was hired by the United States Army Corps of Engineers in 1974 to improve the Tujunga Wash, which was considered an eyesore.

She had an idea to paint a history of Los Angeles from the days of the dinosaurs to 1910. A team of 80 youths from the juvenile justice program, ten artists and five historians collaborated under Baca’s direction to complete the first 1,000 feet, nine panels of murals in 1976.

read more at...

https://lexandneek.wordpress.com/2017/06/01/one-of-the-longest-murals-in-the-world-the-great-wall-of-los-angeles/

Or watch our video journey through The Great Wall of Los Angeles:

Posted by robertpaulsen | Fri Jun 2, 2017, 01:00 PM (1 replies)

If Howard Zinn's A Peoples History of the United States was a mural about L.A., this is it!

Walking along the Tujunga Wash concrete basin in the San Fernando Valley community of Valley Glen, Neek and I were impressed with the enormity of the mural painted on the 13 feet high concrete sides. This is The Great Wall of Los Angeles, one of the longest murals in the world at 2,754 feet (839.42 meters) in length, stretching over six city blocks! Officially titled The History of California, this amazing work of art reminded me thematically of the book A People’s History of the United States by Howard Zinn.

Posted by robertpaulsen | Thu Jun 1, 2017, 01:10 PM (2 replies)
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