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Mon May 18, 2015, 12:41 PM

Why Not Martin O'MAlley?



http://harvardpolitics.com/united-states/martin-omalley/
(snip)
So why have political pundits come to the consensus that Elizabeth Warren is the only one who could give Hillary a run for her money in the Democratic primary? Perhaps it is O’Malley’s lack of name recognition. He is currently polling at around 0.3 percent in the Iowa Democratic Caucus, compared to Clinton’s 58 percent, and Warren’s 17 percent. But that number is increasing, and O’Malley received a warm reception in recent trips to New Hampshire and Iowa.

Perhaps it is because O’Malley is not a woman. While a first female president would certainly be a symbolic victory for women, it is unclear that a Clinton presidency would produce many tangible benefits for women. In fact, in terms of policy, O’Malley seems to have proposed just as many, if not more, policies to help women as Clinton has. At the Harvard Institute of Politics, O’Malley declared, “We must recognize that policies that are good for women and families, like paid leave and safe and affordable child care, are also good for our national economy, and for economic growth, because when women succeed, our American economy also succeeds.”

O’Malley also proclaimed his support for a federal $15 minimum wage, which would give a much-needed raise to the 3 million Americans who work at or below minimum wage, 62 percent of whom are women. Clinton has voiced her support for fast food workers striking for a higher wage, but she has yet to establish how much of an increase in the minimum wage she would support. Despite his gender, O’Malley could be the candidate that would make the biggest difference for women.
(snip)





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Arrow 18 replies Author Time Post
Reply Why Not Martin O'MAlley? (Original post)
Raine1967 May 2015 OP
elleng May 2015 #1
Raine1967 May 2015 #3
elleng May 2015 #4
Iliyah May 2015 #2
Raine1967 May 2015 #5
msongs May 2015 #12
elleng May 2015 #13
Raine1967 May 2015 #14
Raine1967 May 2015 #17
kenfrequed May 2015 #6
Raine1967 May 2015 #7
kenfrequed May 2015 #8
Raine1967 May 2015 #15
kenfrequed May 2015 #18
Koinos May 2015 #9
MADem May 2015 #10
Raine1967 May 2015 #16
FSogol May 2015 #11

Response to Raine1967 (Original post)

Mon May 18, 2015, 12:50 PM

1. BECAUSE

On April 10, Elizabeth Warren joined Jon Stewart on the Daily Show and declared, “Powerful corporations [and] rich people have figured out that if you can bend the government to help you just a little bit, it’s a tremendous payoff, and if you can bend it to help you just a little bit more and a little bit more, the playing field just gets more and more tilted, and the rich and the powerful just do better and better.” A week later, Martin O’Malley stood before a packed crowd at Harvard’s Institute of Politics and proclaimed, “Concentrated wealth has accumulated concentrated political power in the halls of our Congress, and also in many, many, many of our state houses, making it harder than ever to get things done.”

Both of these quotes are emblematic of a nascent populist movement in the Democratic Party. Both reflect a deep concern that all Americans don’t have an equal shot at prosperity. Both demonstrate a growing opposition to the centrist Democratic policies of the Clinton era—the trade policies and the welfare reform—that seemed to mostly benefit the wealthiest Americans.

Yet it is Martin O’Malley, not Elizabeth Warren, who has a proven record of accomplishing real progress on these issues on a state level. It is Martin O’Malley, not Elizabeth Warren, who became the first major Democratic politician to endorse a national $15 minimum wage at the Institute of Politics on Thursday. And it is Martin O’Malley, not Elizabeth Warren, who is seriously considering challenging Hillary Clinton for the Democratic nomination for president in 2016. . .

Perhaps America is ready for a genuinely populist Martin O’Malley campaign. O’Malley certainly appears to be ready.


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Response to elleng (Reply #1)

Mon May 18, 2015, 12:56 PM

3. It was a pretty good op-ed piece, right?

I am not worried about the concerns that he is waiting too long to get into the race. I understand those concerns, but I think it is fine and quite honestly, tactical.



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Response to Raine1967 (Reply #3)

Mon May 18, 2015, 12:58 PM

4. Pretty darn good, Raine!

I'm not concerned about the tactical wait, at all.

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Response to Raine1967 (Original post)

Mon May 18, 2015, 12:50 PM

2. I find him quite intersting. Looking forward to some good old fashion

meaningful debates on issues that matter to the 99%ers.

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Response to Iliyah (Reply #2)

Mon May 18, 2015, 01:10 PM

5. Agreed; I am as well, Iliyah

He's a viable candidate that deserves to be paid attention to.

Take a look around the group, we have a lot of good links here for people to learn from.

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Response to Raine1967 (Reply #5)

Mon May 18, 2015, 02:52 PM

12. he is NOT a candidate. Like Jeb he is just slumming for media attention nt

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Response to msongs (Reply #12)

Mon May 18, 2015, 03:05 PM

13. Jeb may slum,

Martin O'Malley does NOT do so, he is a person of substance, and will demonstrate that he is a CANDIDATE of substance shortly.

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Response to msongs (Reply #12)

Mon May 18, 2015, 03:32 PM

14. Well let's talk after the 30th.

and for you to compare him to Bush is really kinda nasty.

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Response to msongs (Reply #12)

Mon May 18, 2015, 03:40 PM

17. One more thing, I would kindly ask you to take that hyperbole to a forum. This is a group.

Comparing a Democrat to any republican — especially Bush is really terrible. It's also terribly dismissive.

I hate it when people say that about President Obama and I despise it when they say that about SoS/Senator Clinton.

Why do you think saying something like this is acceptable here in the O'Malley group? Would you do that in the Barack Obama Group? The Hillary Clinton Group? The Bernie Sanders GRoup?

If you did, do you think you would be a welcome member of those groups?

Please, in the future consider these thoughts and questions I asked of you.

Have a nice day.

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Response to Raine1967 (Original post)

Mon May 18, 2015, 01:12 PM

6. Bernie has announced.

That would by my first reason. He announced and he has national recognition for his policy support and ideas.

If and when O'Malley (or Warren) announces I will consider who I support carefully. But I don't want to play the wishing game too long when Bernie is a very good candidate on 90% of the issues I care about

I notice the article mentions Warren and Clinton's numbers but not Bernie Sanders whose numbers are growing.

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Response to kenfrequed (Reply #6)

Mon May 18, 2015, 01:17 PM

7. There is room for another candidate.

I have no control over an op ed from the Harvard Political Review.

That said, there is room for discussing another candidate. I support him. Warren will not be announcing. She has made that abundantly clear.

Read a few of the links in this group: O'Malley is announcing on May 30.

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Response to Raine1967 (Reply #7)

Mon May 18, 2015, 01:31 PM

8. Of course there is.

There is room for a number of other candidates, but Bernie Sanders is probably my favorite so far. I will probably be sticking with him as I have been an admirer of his for a decade or so. He speaks truth to power and is willing to stand up to corporate interests.

I have heard good things about O'Malley too and like his record as governor. Either would be a better candidate than Hillary Clinton but in terms of who would challenge Clinton more, I think that Bernie has inertia and is well positioned.

Of course I should also point out that at the end of the day I, like Bernie, will support the candidate that the party endorses.

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Response to kenfrequed (Reply #8)

Mon May 18, 2015, 03:33 PM

15. Thanks kenfrequed.

It's going to be a long primary season, I appreciate the respect.

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Response to Raine1967 (Reply #15)

Mon May 18, 2015, 03:43 PM

18. Don't mention it.

It is good to find people here who are reasonable and respectful. I look forward to this years Democratic debates.

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Response to Raine1967 (Original post)

Mon May 18, 2015, 01:42 PM

9. Thank you, Raine!

When more and more progressives find out what O'Malley stands for and what he has accomplished, they will like him. He has a history of facing challenges and not running from them. He also has good old common sense that, along with principles, guides his pragmatic approach to problem solving. He will talk about what is wrong, but he will also talk about how to fix it.

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Response to Raine1967 (Original post)

Mon May 18, 2015, 02:25 PM

10. He's well-liked. Bill Clinton is very fond of him.

There won't be any nastiness in any potential primary debates, at any rate, I don't think. He's worked with both Clintons before.

http://www.washingtonpost.com/local/md-politics/bill-clinton-loves-martin-omalley-even-if-omalley-runs-against-hillary-rodham-cinton/2014/05/14/8143dd4c-db73-11e3-bda1-9b46b2066796_story.html

Bill Clinton loves Martin O’Malley. Even if O’Malley runs against Hillary Rodham Cinton.


O’Malley has said that he is actively preparing for a potential 2016 presidential run and cannot afford to wait to hear whether Hillary Rodham Clinton — who would be a heavy favorite — is going to move forward with a bid. The two spoke by phone last year, according to O’Malley aides, and Hillary Clinton gave O’Malley her blessing to do what he needs to do to prepare.

Any awkwardness about the situation was not apparent on stage Tuesday night. In fact, the former president went out of his way to praise O’Malley’s leadership during his two terms in the Annapolis statehouse. ... As mayor of Baltimore, O’Malley got to know both Clintons when he was part of the delegation on a presidential trip to Ireland in 2000.


O’Malley and the former president also came into contact through the Democratic Leadership Council, a centrist policy organization. And after the Sept. 11, 2001, terrorist attacks, O’Malley worked with then-Sen. Hillary Clinton on homeland security measures.

Bill Clinton cut a television ad for O’Malley during his 2006 campaign for governor. And in early 2007 — just a few months after being installed in Annapolis — O’Malley became the second governor in the country to endorse Hillary Clinton’s 2008 presidential bid.

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Response to MADem (Reply #10)

Mon May 18, 2015, 03:34 PM

16. +1

This is the kinda stuff I really like to see.

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Response to Raine1967 (Original post)

Mon May 18, 2015, 02:41 PM

11. K & R. n/t

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