HomeLatest ThreadsGreatest ThreadsForums & GroupsMy SubscriptionsMy Posts
DU Home » Latest Threads » Forums & Groups » Retired » Retired Forums » 2016 Postmortem (Forum) » Removing the super delega...

Thu Mar 17, 2016, 12:46 AM

Removing the super delegates for clarity

Required to win nomination:
2383
Delegates available in upcoming contests:
2308

Sanders Pledged Delegates + (required to win):
825 + (1558) = 2383

Needs 67.5% of remaining to clinch nomination


Clinton Pledged Delegates + (required to win):
1139 + (1244) = 2383

Needs 54% of remaining to clinch nomination

IMO that looks like a high probability of a brokered convention. That is when the super delegates become relevant; until then their preference is irrelevant. And if/when we get there, the value of their current commitment is far less important than the lay of the political landscape at the time of the convention.

70 replies, 2846 views

Reply to this thread

Back to top Alert abuse

Always highlight: 10 newest replies | Replies posted after I mark a forum
Replies to this discussion thread
Arrow 70 replies Author Time Post
Reply Removing the super delegates for clarity (Original post)
kristopher Mar 2016 OP
Kittycat Mar 2016 #1
jfern Mar 2016 #2
kristopher Mar 2016 #14
Adrahil Mar 2016 #26
pdsimdars Mar 2016 #44
geek tragedy Mar 2016 #3
stevenleser Mar 2016 #4
stevenleser Mar 2016 #5
kristopher Mar 2016 #9
stevenleser Mar 2016 #12
kristopher Mar 2016 #15
Firebrand Gary Mar 2016 #6
BainsBane Mar 2016 #7
kristopher Mar 2016 #10
LineLineLineReply .
BainsBane Mar 2016 #11
kristopher Mar 2016 #17
JaneyVee Mar 2016 #30
BainsBane Mar 2016 #58
jillan Mar 2016 #8
stevenleser Mar 2016 #13
RobertEarl Mar 2016 #16
brooklynite Mar 2016 #27
leftynyc Mar 2016 #42
LiberalFighter Mar 2016 #18
kristopher Mar 2016 #19
Cheese Sandwich Mar 2016 #21
beachbum bob Mar 2016 #28
joshcryer Mar 2016 #20
BainsBane Mar 2016 #22
joshcryer Mar 2016 #23
DemocratSinceBirth Mar 2016 #29
joshcryer Mar 2016 #32
DemocratSinceBirth Mar 2016 #34
pdsimdars Mar 2016 #46
LiberalFighter Mar 2016 #61
joshcryer Mar 2016 #69
LiberalFighter Mar 2016 #70
Onlooker Mar 2016 #24
LiberalFighter Mar 2016 #62
BlueStateLib Mar 2016 #25
eomer Mar 2016 #31
kristopher Mar 2016 #35
eomer Mar 2016 #45
pdsimdars Mar 2016 #48
DanTex Mar 2016 #33
kristopher Mar 2016 #36
hrmjustin Mar 2016 #37
kristopher Mar 2016 #38
hrmjustin Mar 2016 #39
kristopher Mar 2016 #40
hrmjustin Mar 2016 #41
pdsimdars Mar 2016 #51
Myrina Mar 2016 #47
hrmjustin Mar 2016 #49
Myrina Mar 2016 #50
hrmjustin Mar 2016 #52
LiberalFighter Mar 2016 #64
hrmjustin Mar 2016 #65
LiberalFighter Mar 2016 #63
pdsimdars Mar 2016 #43
jcgoldie Mar 2016 #53
DemocracyDirect Mar 2016 #54
merrily Mar 2016 #55
jcgoldie Mar 2016 #56
LiberalFighter Mar 2016 #66
jcgoldie Mar 2016 #68
dana_b Mar 2016 #60
Gothmog Mar 2016 #57
Tarc Mar 2016 #59
LiberalFighter Mar 2016 #67

Response to kristopher (Original post)

Thu Mar 17, 2016, 12:51 AM

1. Good post. Thanks for sharing.

With so much focus on what Bernie must overcome, it's interesting seeing what Hillary must. Side-by-side. Now we move in to his most favorable states. The dynamics have definitely shifted. The convention certainly will be interesting this year.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to kristopher (Original post)

Thu Mar 17, 2016, 12:52 AM

2. A majority of pledged delegates is just over 2000

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to jfern (Reply #2)

Thu Mar 17, 2016, 01:17 AM

14. True. But that isn't what is required to win in first round vote.

I'm not pretending to be an expert in the process, but I think the small amount I've laid out is accurate.

This race isn't over.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to kristopher (Reply #14)

Thu Mar 17, 2016, 06:58 AM

26. Super-D's vote on the first ballot.

 

Fun fact: Obama never gained a majority of pladged delegates. He needed Super-D's to win. Also,Hillary actually got more of the primary popular vote.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to jfern (Reply #2)

Thu Mar 17, 2016, 09:46 AM

44. They can't really be counted yet.

 

What usually happens is that when there is a clear winner the super delegates switch and support them. They have never been the deciding factor. . .that is, if the states give more pledged delegates to one candidate, the superdelegates will not override the will of the people by selecting the other candidate.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to kristopher (Original post)

Thu Mar 17, 2016, 12:54 AM

3. Clinton already has 400 superdelegates endorsing her

 

Super delegates are not going to help Bernie steal the nomination. They will follow the elected delegates.

Whoever wins the most elected/pledged delegates will be the nominee. Period.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to kristopher (Original post)

Thu Mar 17, 2016, 12:56 AM

4. Well, no, you can't do that now. Superdelegates are a part of Sanders strategy

 

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to kristopher (Original post)

Thu Mar 17, 2016, 12:58 AM

5. And by the way there is close to zero chance of a brokered convention in a two person race.

 

All the delegates vote, pledged and super, and in a two person race, someone will get at least 1/2 plus one.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to stevenleser (Reply #5)

Thu Mar 17, 2016, 01:08 AM

9. If Hillary gets less than 54% AND Bernie gets less than 67.5% where does that lead...

...except to a second vote, since neither would have the requisite 2383 to win?

The second vote has different possible paths based on the dynamics at the time of the second vote. The point is that this race is not over. If it were, the networks that have been working so hard on behalf of Clinton would not be inappropriately including the SDs in the numbers to try and exaggerate clinton's lead. The real numbers would be enough, right?

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to kristopher (Reply #9)

Thu Mar 17, 2016, 01:15 AM

12. Since all delegates vote it leads to one of the two going over the threshold.

 

The superdelegates and the pledged delegates vote on the first ballot. They all vote.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to stevenleser (Reply #12)

Thu Mar 17, 2016, 01:28 AM

15. Ok, I thought I'd heard differently, but I accept your word.

That explains why Bernie is explaining his SD strategy now. It also means that, should Bernie have more pledged delegates (which would imply a great deal of momentum behind him), the SDs will be faced with making their FINAL DECISION between the last primary and the convention.

I wouldn't want to be in the shoes of the 400.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to kristopher (Original post)

Thu Mar 17, 2016, 01:00 AM

6. We're not republicans, we've got super delegates.

There will be no brokered convention. If Sanders is going to be the nominee, he needs to win the majority of the population and a majority of the states, that is what you need to do in order to show you're the best candidate for the general. That's how you win the super delegates. If he wins like Hillary has and does it before we run out of states, then he will be the nominee and I will enthusiastically vote for him.

Otherwise it's Hillary.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to kristopher (Original post)

Thu Mar 17, 2016, 01:01 AM

7. That does the opposite of providing clarity

You get the numbers just plain wrong. The superdelegates are part of the process.

Including supers, Bernie needs 66.3% of remaining delegates and Clinton 30.4% of the total remaining delegates. You really think she can't get that?

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to BainsBane (Reply #7)

Thu Mar 17, 2016, 01:10 AM

10. You are free to keep believing that fairytale.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to kristopher (Reply #10)

Thu Mar 17, 2016, 01:11 AM

11. .

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to BainsBane (Reply #11)

Thu Mar 17, 2016, 01:32 AM

17. It's a fairy tale.

Acting as if the SDs are the same as pledged delegates in order to frame Hillary's goal as 34% is a spin ploy to hide the scale of the challenge facing the super delegates should Bernie have a Majority of pledged delegates.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to BainsBane (Reply #7)

Thu Mar 17, 2016, 08:21 AM

30. I think he needs 74.6%

 

Sanders:
Total dels = 825
Nom total = 2383
Margin = 1558
remaining dels = 2,087
1558 / 2087 = 74.6%

Unless his delegate count changed.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to JaneyVee (Reply #30)

Thu Mar 17, 2016, 12:17 PM

58. I included his superdelegates

for a total delegate count was 851. My math could well be wrong though.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to kristopher (Original post)

Thu Mar 17, 2016, 01:08 AM

8. I have been finding it very curious how the msm always talks about the possibility of a GOP brokered

convention but is missing the point that the Dems may be having one as well.

Bernie has said he is in it till the convention.
#StillSanders has been trending on twitter all day and is now up to 165k tweets and that matters because there are well over 100k people that want him to stay in and fight and will continue to fund his campaign.
We are not going to let him quit.

I really think we are going all the way to the convention - 2383 delegates or not.

to the end!

No Retreat No Surrender

Not accepting her as the nominee.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to jillan (Reply #8)

Thu Mar 17, 2016, 01:16 AM

13. If you understand the process, you know that with only two candidates, its virtually impossible

 

on the Democratic side.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to kristopher (Original post)

Thu Mar 17, 2016, 01:30 AM

16. This is why we must educate the supers

 

The supers must feel the Bern and be ready and willing to vote for Bernie on the first vote.

That and expect many challenges of the pledged delegates.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to RobertEarl (Reply #16)

Thu Mar 17, 2016, 07:07 AM

27. Before you start educating Superdelegates...

...maybe you need to find a way to get Bernie some pledged delegates. He's not doing so well in that regard.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to RobertEarl (Reply #16)

Thu Mar 17, 2016, 09:42 AM

42. Aren't you getting tired

 

of telling us that anyone not voting for Bernie is too stupid to know better?

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to kristopher (Original post)

Thu Mar 17, 2016, 01:43 AM

18. My math is different.

Not including automatic delegates.
Clinton: 1180
Sanders: 837

Again without using automatic delegates.
Clinton needs 41.59% plus of the remaining to win nomination.
Sanders needs 58.46% plus of the remaining to win nomination.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to LiberalFighter (Reply #18)

Thu Mar 17, 2016, 01:58 AM

19. You mean the assumptions are different

Math is math.

You're assuming that a simple majority of pledged delegates is a winner.

I'm assuming the 2383 number as a function of pledged delegates is the only definitive winner.

I opted for my assumption largely because it lets the SDs off the hook - they don't have to worry about being placed in the position of overturning a popular majority. It is also the only path we can look at that would be definitive on the day the primaries end.

But your case is valid as long as it's clear the SDs will vote with the majority. I'm not sure that's true if the majority holder is Bernie under 2383.


Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to kristopher (Reply #19)

Thu Mar 17, 2016, 02:28 AM

21. I get what you're doing but...

 


I wouldn't make those assumptions.

Remember many of the superdelegates are still uncommitted.

Remember also that if Bernie wins a majority of the pledged delegates, then he would only need in total HALF of the superdelegates in order to neutralize Hillary's advantage with superdelegates.

It's easy to imagine SOME superdelegates shifting around in order avoid overturning the vote of the pledged delegates.

So if we set the smaller goal of winning a majority of the pledged delegates, it leaves a clearer path still open to win the nomination. Really I think that's his only path, if he has one. But obviously the more pledged delegates he can win the better it will be.

Half of the pledged delegates would be 2026. He would need about 58% of the remaining pledged delegates for that.

It's a pretty big distance from there to 2383. It's hard for me to imagine him winning 58% of pledged delegates from here on out, but it's impossible to imagine him winning 67.5%.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to LiberalFighter (Reply #18)

Thu Mar 17, 2016, 07:32 AM

28. hillary can sleepwak to get the 42% of the remaining pledge delegats...its the math

 

and sanders supporters don't want to accept it...just like hillary supporters in 2008....

hillary wins New York, Pennsylvanian, California....just the gains in delegates in those 3 states puts nearly over

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to kristopher (Original post)

Thu Mar 17, 2016, 02:11 AM

20. There was only a 62 pledged delegate spread in 2008.

Obama won by well under 100 pledged delegates because the superdelegates made sure of it and Clinton released her delegates for him. There was a lot of talk going up to the convention that Clinton was going to try to win over a hundreds of superdelegates, argue she had a bigger popular vote, to try to take the thing, but that would've destroyed the party.

So if we take that as precedent then it won't be brokered unless the spread is even much smaller and if you think Sanders won't go to the convention in good faith, will call for a brokered convention, would demand that his delegates don't vote for Clinton, etc (which is preposterous).

Clinton really has followed Obama's delegate strategy this go around with great success.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to joshcryer (Reply #20)

Thu Mar 17, 2016, 05:24 AM

22. She won't need Sanders delegates

She only needs 30% of the remaining delegates to win the nomination. That won't be difficult.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to BainsBane (Reply #22)

Thu Mar 17, 2016, 05:35 AM

23. Sanders will release his delegates.

Just as Clinton released hers in 2008.

Are you kidding?

Obviously she won't "need" them as she has a 300 point lead and by the time this is over it may well be 3-4x what Obama had.

But Sanders will release them and tell them to vote for Clinton. They will by voice vote (some salty delegates might yell no but no one will care or even notice) and that'll be that.

I'm talking about party unity, not about Bernie or Bust nonsense. Clinton and Sanders will make it clear it was a fair fight and will work together. It's a given. What's going to really kill faux Sanders supporters is when he disavows Weaver's narrative about the negative campaigning he was made to do. Every time Sanders went negative I could see trepidation. He'll come out and say it is what it was, campaign politicking.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to joshcryer (Reply #20)

Thu Mar 17, 2016, 08:15 AM

29. Ted Kennedy actually tried to get delegates released from their first round pledges in 80 and failed

I idolized the Kennedys; my mom, god bless her, was a Kennedy organizer, and I worked on his campaign. At the time I supported the ploy. In retrospect I was wrong. Jimmy Carter garnered the most votes and pledged delegates. He was the winner.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to DemocratSinceBirth (Reply #29)

Thu Mar 17, 2016, 08:26 AM

32. The supers are mostly symbolic.

The bigger deal for the nomination process for democrats was the Mikulski Commission (preference for minority heavy states) and the Fairness Commission (ending the winner take all system due to Gary Hart and Jesse Jackson protesting). As far as I understand the supers have never truly decided the thing. They go with the majority delegate vote.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to joshcryer (Reply #32)

Thu Mar 17, 2016, 08:32 AM

34. Ted Kennedy wanted for the delegates to be released from their first round pledges.

Ted Kennedy wanted for the delegates to be released from their first round pledges. His rationale was that circumstances had changed since the primary season began and that if early voters could have voted later they would have voted differently, sound familiar?


Even if they were allowed to "vote their conscience" they likely would have stayed with the candidate they were bound to because that was why they were chosen in the first place.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to joshcryer (Reply #32)

Thu Mar 17, 2016, 09:52 AM

46. Yes, everyone seems to cloud the issue with their slanted theorizing

 

But the critical point is just what you said, . . . that the supers have NEVER decided it, they go with the majority delegate vote. Plain and simple. People want to muddy the waters to suit their agenda.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to joshcryer (Reply #32)

Thu Mar 17, 2016, 09:34 PM

61. I don't see anywhere that the minority heavy states benefit more than others.

Distribution of delegates is based on average votes for Democratic candidate and electoral votes. While automatic delegates are based on elected officials and DNC members.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to LiberalFighter (Reply #61)

Thu Mar 17, 2016, 11:16 PM

69. I'm talking of why they go earlier.

In the nomination process.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to joshcryer (Reply #69)

Fri Mar 18, 2016, 02:43 PM

70. I don't see how the Mikulski Commission brought about those states going earlier.

Or any other commission. Unless a state opts out they pretty much have to go with whatever the state legislatures agree to for primary dates. Those dates are likely to be the same for both parties when it involves a primary as it costs more to have two separate primaries in a state.

The minority thing is not legislated by the states and only applies to whatever the parties have for their rules. Unlike the Democratic Party through McGovern and Mikulski, the Republican Party does not provide for equal distribution by gender or minority representation.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to kristopher (Original post)

Thu Mar 17, 2016, 05:35 AM

24. But, Bernie blew it with the superdelegates

 

When the Bernie said he was only a Democrat for opportunistic reasons, he basically said fuck you to the Democratic Party. It will take an enormous change in the situation for superdelegates to support him, especially if Hillary wins more delegates in the primaries. Plus, add to that the fact that many Bernie supporters object strongly to superdelegates having the ability to sway the nomination against the will of the voters, so it's possible that even superdelegates who support Bernie would oppose efforts on his part in that regard.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to Onlooker (Reply #24)

Thu Mar 17, 2016, 09:39 PM

62. I find it disingenuous for Bernie to even be on the ballot after all this time.

He wasn't a delegate, automatic or otherwise in 2008 or 2012. But because he is on the ballot now he is one now.

Also, when Bernie became a Senator he had the option of not caucusing with the Democrats or the Republicans, or caucusing. He caucus so he could get committee positions and resources.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to kristopher (Original post)

Thu Mar 17, 2016, 06:04 AM

25. Superdelegate votes are counted on the first ballot.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to kristopher (Original post)

Thu Mar 17, 2016, 08:24 AM

31. Sort of, but with a two-candidate race like this it should really be just a formality.

One of the two candidates is going to win a majority of pledged delegates. Barring some extraordinary set of circumstances that should settle it - the other candidate should concede and the supers should vote in support of the decision of the voters.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to eomer (Reply #31)

Thu Mar 17, 2016, 09:28 AM

35. I agree, but that isn't the line the news media is promoting to help Hillary.

They are pushing delegate counts that include super delegates and then using the 2383 number as the winning goalpost.

They are doing that to create the false impression that Hillary is much much further ahead than is actually the case.

They are, effectively, lying on behalf of Hillary.

Do you think that's by accident and that Hillary is not complicit in the decisions behind such coverage?

The very last word anyone would use about this contest is fair.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to kristopher (Reply #35)

Thu Mar 17, 2016, 09:49 AM

45. True, but I don't think it helps to go along with their framing.

This is the internets - where people who have rejected the MSM go to find out what's really happening.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to kristopher (Reply #35)

Thu Mar 17, 2016, 09:54 AM

48. And that is why, if Bernie really does pull it off, he will have beaten "the establishment"

 

including the media, because he will have had to fight them all and all the barriers they have thrown in his path.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to kristopher (Original post)

Thu Mar 17, 2016, 08:26 AM

33. LOL. Brokered convention. Sorry, she's up by 300+ pledged. It's a done deal.

It is hilarious, though, that the same people who just a few days ago were complaining about the undemocratic nature of superdelegates, are now hoping that those same superdelegates are going to override the overwhelming choice of the electorate.

But it's not going to happen. Game over.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to DanTex (Reply #33)

Thu Mar 17, 2016, 09:29 AM

36. No where will you find those thoughts in my posts.

Do you always make things up on behalf of others?

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to kristopher (Original post)

Thu Mar 17, 2016, 09:30 AM

37. Sanders will lose the closed primaries in AZ, NY, PA, and MD.

 

He will not win.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to hrmjustin (Reply #37)

Thu Mar 17, 2016, 09:33 AM

38. That may be true. Then again, maybe not.

I have no idea why you thought it was relevant to the OP.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to kristopher (Reply #38)

Thu Mar 17, 2016, 09:38 AM

39. My point is these states have a large amount of delegates and Sanders does poorly among

 

registered Democrats so in a closed primary he will lose.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to hrmjustin (Reply #39)

Thu Mar 17, 2016, 09:40 AM

40. You actually don't have a point - just an opinion.

And not a particularly well formed one if that is the sum total of your evidence.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to kristopher (Reply #40)

Thu Mar 17, 2016, 09:42 AM

41. Well on April 26th you will get my point.

 

Take care!

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to kristopher (Reply #40)

Thu Mar 17, 2016, 09:59 AM

51. I always like to point out that the Democratic Party is only 31% of the electorate

 

That means there is almost 70% who are NOT democrats. You can be a big fish in a small pond, but it doesn't tell you a whole lot about how you will fare in the big pond.

Bernie does MUCH better among Independents and Republicans than Hillary does. And THAT is the field you have to compete in. Bernie regularly gets 20% of the Republican vote in Vermont, they can trust him. Hillary can not. But they can't see past .. "we won, we are awesome." Forgetting to think about the big picture.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to hrmjustin (Reply #37)

Thu Mar 17, 2016, 09:54 AM

47. .. but are they 'winner take all' in terms of delegates?

If not, your point is moot.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to Myrina (Reply #47)

Thu Mar 17, 2016, 09:57 AM

49. No but she will win them by double digits.

 

There will not be a contested convention.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to hrmjustin (Reply #49)

Thu Mar 17, 2016, 09:59 AM

50. Like she did the other night, and *still* only came away with 57 more delegates ...

... again, your point is moot.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to Myrina (Reply #50)

Thu Mar 17, 2016, 10:02 AM

52. Not all the delegates have been distributed from Tuesday.

 

But she will end the prmaries with more pledge delegates and she will win.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to hrmjustin (Reply #52)

Thu Mar 17, 2016, 09:52 PM

64. It looks like the delegates from Tuesday are now all accounted.

Clinton: 397
Sanders: 294

Advantage: 103 Clinton (57.5%)

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to LiberalFighter (Reply #64)

Thu Mar 17, 2016, 09:54 PM

65. Thanks.

 

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to hrmjustin (Reply #37)

Thu Mar 17, 2016, 09:47 PM

63. It is really not about losing states. (The media's fault)

If that were the case then it should be nearly over by now with Hillary's 18 and Bernie's 9 and 1 tied. Because then she would need only 11 more states or territories regardless of their delegate strength.

It is about winning delegates. I do think that Hillary will win the necessary delegates without automatic delegates being the major reason.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to kristopher (Original post)

Thu Mar 17, 2016, 09:43 AM

43. With all the misleading posts about it being all over, it's nice to get real clarity. NUMBERS

 

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to pdsimdars (Reply #43)

Thu Mar 17, 2016, 10:02 AM

53. this OP is not clarity it is the opposite

It is completely confused. Superdelegates vote on the first ballot. The democratic convention has almost zero chance of being "brokered" regardless of which candidate you think will win it's almost impossible to get that result with only 2 candidates in the race.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to kristopher (Original post)

Thu Mar 17, 2016, 10:07 AM

54. Fantastic Argument

 

I think we also need to take a close look at where we are in July.

As Trump gets closer and closer to nomination, he's going to come after Hillary hard.

Everyone should keep an open mind to reassess at that time.

And keep your passionate arguments ready for then.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to kristopher (Original post)

Thu Mar 17, 2016, 10:13 AM

55. 54% v. 57% and we're starting on states that are better for Bernie! Woot!

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to merrily (Reply #55)

Thu Mar 17, 2016, 10:21 AM

56. lol She doesnt need 54%

She needs 42% going forward. It doesn't even make any sense to say they both need over 50%. This thread is completely mathematically illiterate and wrong about how the convention even works.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to jcgoldie (Reply #56)

Thu Mar 17, 2016, 09:56 PM

66. Using numbers without the automatic delegates makes it easier.

It should be a good indicator when a candidate reaches the 50% +1 without the automatic delegates that they are the winner. Even if those delegates went proportional.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to LiberalFighter (Reply #66)

Thu Mar 17, 2016, 10:31 PM

68. I agree just throw out the superdelegates for the math

Because they can always change and likely will if the opposite candidate gets over 50% of pledged delegates. But if you do that then it makes zero sense to use 2383 as the measure of delegates needed to win the nomination. Use 50% of pledged delegates if you are only counting pledged delegates. That number is only 2026. She has 1151 with a few left to be assigned in FLA and IL.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to merrily (Reply #55)

Thu Mar 17, 2016, 01:14 PM

60. +1

Woo hoo!!

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to kristopher (Original post)

Thu Mar 17, 2016, 10:24 AM

57. Ignoring super delegates does not help Sanders

The super delegates are not going to support sanders and Sanders will not be able to overcome Clinton's lead in delegates (both pledged and super)

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to Gothmog (Reply #57)

Thu Mar 17, 2016, 12:27 PM

59. Even if Sanders wins every remaining state at 60%, and discounting supers entirely...

He'd have a +90 lead, that's all. As soon as you takeaway the super-obvious states where he won'tbe anywhere near 60%...AZ, DC, NY, CA, and he drops back to 2nd place. Every state where he doesn't hit 60% puts more of a burden on the remaining states to push him back on top.

It's just not going to happen.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to Gothmog (Reply #57)

Thu Mar 17, 2016, 10:02 PM

67. Technically, most of the automatic delegates will not support Sanders.

He does have some.

BTW in 2008, Hillary's biggest margin was 15 over Obama just before the Feb 5th Primaries. After those primaries she never led again.

While in 2016, she has a 324 delegate advantage not including automatic delegates.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink

Reply to this thread