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Tue Mar 15, 2016, 02:17 PM

Can Someone Please Explain How MIXED Primaries Work?

Both NC and Ohio are 'mixed' primaries. I interpret this to mean some precincts allow switch over votes and others do not. Can anyone identify which counties/precincts or whatever---have open voting and which ones are closed? Thank you!




Tue, Mar 15 Florida Closed
Tue, Mar 15 Illinois Open
Tue, Mar 15 Missouri Open
Tue, Mar 15 North Carolina Mixed
Tue, Mar 15 Northern Mariana Is. Caucus Closed
Tue, Mar 15 Ohio Mixed

Read more at http://www.uspresidentialelectionnews.com/2016-presidential-primary-schedule-calendar/#PsvUhQHx16dsrxri.99



26 replies, 1850 views

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Arrow 26 replies Author Time Post
Reply Can Someone Please Explain How MIXED Primaries Work? (Original post)
Land of Enchantment Mar 2016 OP
notadmblnd Mar 2016 #1
Motown_Johnny Mar 2016 #15
notadmblnd Mar 2016 #22
pkdu Mar 2016 #2
OhioBlue Mar 2016 #3
TDale313 Mar 2016 #4
Tierra_y_Libertad Mar 2016 #6
TDale313 Mar 2016 #13
Svafa Mar 2016 #10
Cal Carpenter Mar 2016 #12
Svafa Mar 2016 #14
revbones Mar 2016 #5
B2G Mar 2016 #17
revbones Mar 2016 #18
B2G Mar 2016 #19
revbones Mar 2016 #26
LisaM Mar 2016 #7
nichomachus Mar 2016 #8
Le Taz Hot Mar 2016 #21
nichomachus Mar 2016 #23
Le Taz Hot Mar 2016 #24
nichomachus Mar 2016 #25
Kittycat Mar 2016 #9
Land of Enchantment Mar 2016 #11
B2G Mar 2016 #16
mmonk Mar 2016 #20

Response to Land of Enchantment (Original post)

Tue Mar 15, 2016, 02:20 PM

1. Michigan had two ballots

we were required to tell the poll workers which one we wanted. Dem or Rep.

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Response to notadmblnd (Reply #1)

Tue Mar 15, 2016, 04:26 PM

15. Michigan is an Open Primary

 

Anyone can vote in anything, but only one.

Party registration is meaningless, in so far as primaries are concerned.






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Response to Motown_Johnny (Reply #15)

Tue Mar 15, 2016, 04:46 PM

22. I know. I voted.

Thanks though.

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Response to Land of Enchantment (Original post)

Tue Mar 15, 2016, 02:21 PM

2. You MUST be registered to vote , but dont have to vote Party registration nt

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Response to Land of Enchantment (Original post)

Tue Mar 15, 2016, 02:21 PM

3. All of Ohio votes the same way

You request your ballot when you vote. If you request an R ballot, you become registered R. If you request D, you become registered D. You can also request an issues only ballot.

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Response to Land of Enchantment (Original post)

Tue Mar 15, 2016, 02:22 PM

4. Not sure on the others... In Ohio

It appears the way it works is you claim party affiliation not when you register, but by requesting one or the other's ballot in the primary. Anyone registered to vote could request either a Dem or Rep ballot- they would then be listed as a dem or rep on the voter rolls unless they chose the other party's ballot in a future primary

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Response to TDale313 (Reply #4)

Tue Mar 15, 2016, 02:24 PM

6. Do you get to choose a ballot for every office?

 

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Response to Tierra_y_Libertad (Reply #6)

Tue Mar 15, 2016, 02:54 PM

13. I don't believe so.

You're choosing to vote in either the Republican or Dem primaries

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Response to TDale313 (Reply #4)

Tue Mar 15, 2016, 02:32 PM

10. What's the difference between that and an "open" primary?

That sounds like how it is here in MO, but we are listed as "open," not "mixed." What's the difference between the two?

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Response to Svafa (Reply #10)

Tue Mar 15, 2016, 02:36 PM

12. It looks like by choosing a party you are actually committing to that party in terms

of registration in these 'mixed' states.

In Michigan, we have an open primary. I am registered as an independent and when I choose the Dem ballot I don't become registered as a Dem. I'm still an independent. I think MO is the same way. But it looks like in the 'mixed' states, it isn't quite an open party because you are declaring your affiliation when you choose a ballot.

That's how I read it, anyway. Maybe it's meant to deter people from crossing over for strategic reasons rather than sticking with the party they identify with?

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Response to Cal Carpenter (Reply #12)

Tue Mar 15, 2016, 03:20 PM

14. Thanks for the clarification; that makes sense!

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Response to Land of Enchantment (Original post)

Tue Mar 15, 2016, 02:23 PM

5. From my understanding

 

In NC

1. If you are Dem or Rep, you can only vote in that primary
(Me a registered Dem had to vote in Dem primary. My father-in-law a registered Rep had to vote in Rep primary)
2. If you are unaffiliated, you can vote in either primary
(My wife & mother-in-law are unaffiliated. They each requested a Dem ballot to vote for Bernie)
3. Registered Independent - is this such a thing? Someone told me that as a "registered independent" they were prohibited in voting in either primary today. I'm not sure of whether this is true or not, I can only vouch for #1 & #2


From the NC site:
Iím Unaffiliated. Can I vote in the primary?

If you registered as an Unaffiliated voter and want to vote in the Primary, you can ask for a Republican, Democratic, Libertarian or Nonpartisan ballot. Your choice does not change your Unaffiliated status or obligate you to vote for a partyís candidates in the General Election. However, if there is a Primary Runoff, you can only participate in the Runoff of the same party that you selected in the original Primary.

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Response to revbones (Reply #5)

Tue Mar 15, 2016, 04:31 PM

17. Regarding #3

 

If you are unaffiliated (yes, there is such a thing), you choose either a Republican or Democratic ballot.

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Response to B2G (Reply #17)

Tue Mar 15, 2016, 04:32 PM

18. In #3 I didn't say that

 

In #3 I said " Registered Independent " and asked if there was such a thing since I acknowledged "unaffiliated" in #2

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Response to revbones (Reply #18)

Tue Mar 15, 2016, 04:37 PM

19. Unaffiliated = Independent in NC

 

Same thing.

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Response to B2G (Reply #19)

Tue Mar 15, 2016, 08:03 PM

26. Sheesh. Got to be right or something? Re-read my post.

 

And you'll hopefully understand where you went wrong.

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Response to Land of Enchantment (Original post)

Tue Mar 15, 2016, 02:26 PM

7. The way it worked in Michigan (statewide, I think)

was that you were handed a ballot with Republican on one side and Democratic on the other. You go to the machine and vote one side or the other. If you vote on both sides, the ballot is spoiled and won't count.

So, it allows for crossover voting and independents to vote in party primaries. Good people disagree over this (should independents get to choose candidates for the parties?), but that's the way it's set up in some states.

In Washington state, you need to sign an affidavit confirming that you can be considered a Democrat or Republican for that caucus. It's then considered a felony to vote for the other party in their primary or caucus, but in 2008 the Democrats told me that they did not intend to cross check the lists (they held a "beauty contest" primary a couple of months after the caucus).

I'm not personally a fan of open primaries, but they exist, and can wreak some havoc, as we have seen

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Response to Land of Enchantment (Original post)

Tue Mar 15, 2016, 02:27 PM

8. California is more confusing

The parties decide whether independents can vote in their primary. So, as an independent, you don't know until the party makes a decision.

I was registered as an independent, but changed to Dem, so I could vote for Bernie. Once I vote, or if the primary is "over" before I vote, I will re-register as an independent.

California also has a bunch of other wacky election laws that were put in by ballot questions. They were clearly designed in an attempt to give Republicans a leg up.

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Response to nichomachus (Reply #8)

Tue Mar 15, 2016, 04:37 PM

21. Actually, not quite correct.

When you say "Independent" in California, you are referring to an actual established political party. The CDP has decided you can vote in the Democratic Party primary if you are a registered Democrat or a registered No Party Preference. When you get to your precinct, the precinct worker will ask you which party's ballot you would like. If you want to vote for Bernie, you tell them Democrat.

The Republicans, however, only allow registered Republicans to vote in their primary.

We've been doing massive voter registration here and the fact that the CDP lets NPP to vote in their primary is a good thing because the DNC and the CDP have so soiled the name "Democrat" that, if they had to register as a Democrat to vote for Bernie, many probably wouldn't. We get about half and half.

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Response to Le Taz Hot (Reply #21)

Tue Mar 15, 2016, 05:02 PM

23. Told you it was confusing

However, I vote by mail. So how do I get the right ballot?

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Response to nichomachus (Reply #23)

Tue Mar 15, 2016, 05:29 PM

24. That I don't know

but all you have to do is call your county election office and they'll have the answer.

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Response to Le Taz Hot (Reply #24)

Tue Mar 15, 2016, 05:33 PM

25. I settled it by switching to Democrat until after the primary

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Response to Land of Enchantment (Original post)

Tue Mar 15, 2016, 02:34 PM

11. Thank you all for your explanations

and I understand that many in Ohio are crossing over from Democratic to Republican to vote for Kasich. I am wondering if the densely populated areas are open or closed and why it is categorized as 'mixed'. I can't find anything on the interwebs to explain that part of it.




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Response to Land of Enchantment (Original post)

Tue Mar 15, 2016, 04:29 PM

16. For North Carolina:

 

If you're registered Republican, you get the ballot for the Republican candidates.
If you're registered Democrat, you get the ballot for the Democratic candidates.

If you're unaffiliated, you choose your ballot.

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Response to Land of Enchantment (Original post)

Tue Mar 15, 2016, 04:37 PM

20. Unaffiliated voters can choose which primary they want to vote in.

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