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Wed Feb 17, 2016, 02:05 PM

 

Would you say that the Democratic Party (not DU) leans more toward maintaining

the status quo or towards making deep and fundamental changes to it?

It strikes me that there is a pretty even (and deep) split, witness the tightening poll numbers nationally and in key early states.

This really seems a battle for the heart and soul of the Democratic Party for at least the next generation. If I'm correct, who do you think will win that battle and why? If I am incorrect, why?

Full disclosure: I support Sanders and deep and fundamental changes.

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Reply Would you say that the Democratic Party (not DU) leans more toward maintaining (Original post)
KingCharlemagne Feb 2016 OP
GreenPartyVoter Feb 2016 #1
KingCharlemagne Feb 2016 #8
Fearless Feb 2016 #2
Ferd Berfel Feb 2016 #3
KingCharlemagne Feb 2016 #16
Ferd Berfel Feb 2016 #17
Kelvin Mace Feb 2016 #4
onecaliberal Feb 2016 #6
Kelvin Mace Feb 2016 #9
onecaliberal Feb 2016 #11
cali Feb 2016 #5
noretreatnosurrender Feb 2016 #7
firebrand80 Feb 2016 #10
brooklynite Feb 2016 #12
KingCharlemagne Feb 2016 #13
Ron Green Feb 2016 #14
KingCharlemagne Feb 2016 #15

Response to KingCharlemagne (Original post)

Wed Feb 17, 2016, 02:09 PM

1. Obviously, I was a Green up until recently. I changed my registration specifically

in order to support Bernie, because I see him as being the candidate who is out to make those big changes. I am hoping that this is a new direction for the Party, and that I have found a new home here.

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Response to GreenPartyVoter (Reply #1)

Wed Feb 17, 2016, 02:41 PM

8. I really like and respect Dr. Jill Stein. I would love to see

 

President Sanders find a spot for her in his administration. They strike me as both cut from the same bolt of (homespun) cloth.

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Response to KingCharlemagne (Original post)

Wed Feb 17, 2016, 02:10 PM

2. People before party.

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Response to KingCharlemagne (Original post)

Wed Feb 17, 2016, 02:14 PM

3. The Dem Party has been all about Status Quo since the Clintons sold the Party to the Koch's

And that won't change without a lot of wailing and gnashing of teeth, and pain ans suffering among
the rank-and-file.

Sadly. Hillary will not change this.

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Response to Ferd Berfel (Reply #3)

Thu Feb 18, 2016, 07:55 AM

16. "Clinton sold the Party to the Koch's (sic)" - I follow politics and current

 

events pretty closely, but this is the first time I have heard this claim. Not saying you are wrong per se, but could you please elaborate?

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Response to KingCharlemagne (Reply #16)

Thu Feb 18, 2016, 01:46 PM

17. here

http://www.sourcewatch.org/index.php?title=Democratic_Leadership_Council

Funding

An August, 2000 Newsweek story on Joe Liebermn, The Soul And The Steel[1] reveals that some of the early funding came from ARCO, Chevron, Merck, Du Pont, Microsoft, Philip Morris and Koch Industries:


--------------
The Rightwing Koch Brothers Fund The DLC

...But the Kochs have been working both sides of the fence. As Bill Berkowitz writes, the Koch brothers have also been funding the Democratic Leadership Council....

http://www.democrats.com/node/7789

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Response to KingCharlemagne (Original post)

Wed Feb 17, 2016, 02:18 PM

4. A day of reckoning is coming where the Democratic Party

 

must decide whose side they are on: The voter or the corporations.

Corporations certainly have money, but they don't get to actually vote.

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Response to Kelvin Mace (Reply #4)

Wed Feb 17, 2016, 02:33 PM

6. I agree, because this election isn't going to go their way. They will have to

make a choice between money and people. I'm not holding my breath.

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Response to onecaliberal (Reply #6)

Wed Feb 17, 2016, 03:05 PM

9. Well, they can choose money,

 

then lose their jobs and any need for the corporations to pay them. Of they can choose the voters and still have a job that pays them $174,000 a year.

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Response to Kelvin Mace (Reply #9)

Wed Feb 17, 2016, 04:15 PM

11. They don't even realize. We are talking about people who want a brokered convention

If the wrong candidate makes it there.

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Response to KingCharlemagne (Original post)

Wed Feb 17, 2016, 02:19 PM

5. Institutions tend to engage in what is known, unsurprisingly,

 

as institutional behavior. The institution itself drives the behavior of individual members. Institutions lean toward preserving their power.

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Response to KingCharlemagne (Original post)

Wed Feb 17, 2016, 02:34 PM

7. Party OUT OF TOUCH

Would you say that the Democratic Party (not DU) leans more toward maintaining
the status quo or towards making deep and fundamental changes to it?

It strikes me that there is a pretty even (and deep) split, witness the tightening poll numbers nationally and in key early states.

This really seems a battle for the heart and soul of the Democratic Party for at least the next generation. If I'm correct, who do you think will win that battle and why? If I am incorrect, why?

Full disclosure: I support Sanders and deep and fundamental changes.



They are protecting the status quo but they are also making deep and fundamental changes to this country. How is that possible? If you do incremental change for decades you end up with HUGE change and when you keep anyone from changing what you've changed you are protecting the status quo. That's what they've done. And sadly, their change is moving in the wrong direction. It's leaving all of us behind. We have been continuously moving right for decades.

If the Democrats were actually representing rank and file Democratic voters would Sanders get the huge support he's getting? I love Bernie but it's the issues that are driving this election.

By the way the reason for the incremental change is to hide it from voters. It's kind of like turning the heat up gradually. At first you don't notice it because it's such an incremental change. At some point when it gets hot enough you are sweating. Some of us notice that incremental change sooner than others. Eventually everyone will notice but will we be able to do anything about it? I don't want to wait to find out. I want a course correction NOW.

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Response to KingCharlemagne (Original post)

Wed Feb 17, 2016, 03:06 PM

10. People in power have a vested interest in the status quo nt

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Response to KingCharlemagne (Original post)

Wed Feb 17, 2016, 04:18 PM

12. Answer: neither...

The Democratic Party leans toward progressing forward on many social and economic issues; just not at the speed some folks demand.

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Response to brooklynite (Reply #12)

Wed Feb 17, 2016, 04:28 PM

13. My OP was prompted by a DUer a few days ago who noted that Hillary's inability to

 

sew up the nomination quickly (and Jeb's flame-out to Trump) is due to her perception that this year is a 'change' election.

I think it is pretty universally conceded that Hillary wishes to maintain the Obama legacy (with a few tweaks here and there), while Sanders proposes a more radical break with the past.

The polls suggest that the party's members are roughly evenly split between these two courses of action, if I'm reading things correctly.

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Response to KingCharlemagne (Original post)

Wed Feb 17, 2016, 04:52 PM

14. 2016 is a big test for America and we may yet fail it.


Right now there seems to be real momentum for a new political economy, but the forces that have gripped us for decades will not easily relinquish control.

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Response to Ron Green (Reply #14)

Wed Feb 17, 2016, 05:00 PM

15. It does have the feel of a 'sea change' (or 'tipping point'), but it is too soon to see

 

whetber the populist furor will result in any lasting changes. I would like to say as an original participant in Occupy Los Angeles that Occupy was the sine qua non of the political tsunami that seems to be gathering.

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