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Sat Jun 2, 2012, 10:48 PM

Any good books about Buddhism you know of?

I have a library right by me, and so it'll be easy to get anything y'all suggest.

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Reply Any good books about Buddhism you know of? (Original post)
Neoma Jun 2012 OP
white_wolf Jun 2012 #1
onestepforward Jun 2012 #2
Neoma Jun 2012 #4
YankeyMCC Jun 2012 #3
Odin2005 Jun 2012 #5
YankeyMCC Jun 2012 #6
renate Jun 2012 #7
FreeState Jun 2012 #8
didact Oct 2012 #17
grantcart Jun 2012 #9
Manifestor_of_Light Jun 2012 #10
byeya Jul 2012 #11
mmonk Jul 2012 #12
byeya Aug 2012 #13
JudyM Aug 2012 #14
left-of-center2012 Oct 2012 #15
TommyCelt Oct 2012 #16
pitbullgirl1965 Oct 2012 #18
TM99 Jan 2013 #19
roberthespinosa Feb 2013 #20
Th1onein Feb 2013 #21
rabid_byter Feb 2013 #22

Response to Neoma (Original post)

Sat Jun 2, 2012, 10:58 PM

1. Anything by Thich Nhat Hann, more suggestions below...

I've heard books by the Dali Lama are good as well, but I haven't read any. Also, if you want to read sutras I suggest "In the Buddha's Words" by Bhikku Bodi for an anthology of the Pali or Theravada Cannon. Also, Red Pine's translation and commentary on the Heart Sutra is very good. Also I've heard Stephen Bachelor's "Buddhism without beliefs" is good if you'd like a non-religious take on it. Feel free to PM me with any questions.

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Response to Neoma (Original post)

Sun Jun 3, 2012, 01:14 AM

2. This is a wonderful book:

The Art of Happiness by the Dali Lama and Howard Cutler.

I really loved this book. It is done in collaboration with Howard Cutler, a Western psychiatrist, and the Dali Lama. It is an fascinating comparison between Western and Eastern ways of thinking and dealing with common problems.

It's an easy, but thought-provoking read and you don't have to be a Buddhist to enjoy it



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Response to onestepforward (Reply #2)

Sun Jun 3, 2012, 08:58 AM

4. You mentioned a book I already have.

Yay.

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Response to Neoma (Original post)

Sun Jun 3, 2012, 05:49 AM

3. A few

Pavement by Lin Jensen
Walking up to what you do by Diane Eshin Rezzetto
The Heart of Being by John Daido Loori
Being Upright by Reb Anderson

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Response to Neoma (Original post)

Tue Jun 5, 2012, 11:42 PM

5. "Buddhism Without Beliefs" by Stephen Bachelor.

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Response to Odin2005 (Reply #5)

Wed Jun 6, 2012, 07:35 AM

6. Good one, also his Wife Martine has some good books

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Response to Neoma (Original post)

Mon Jun 11, 2012, 03:56 PM

7. Buddha Is as Buddha Does

Last edited Mon Jun 11, 2012, 06:22 PM - Edit history (1)

Very user-friendly.

Also highly recommended as more of a self-help/psychology book than a book about Buddhism per se: The Misleading Mind. Super good.

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Response to Neoma (Original post)

Tue Jun 12, 2012, 04:45 PM

8. Anything by Jack Kornfield

"A path with heart: a guide through the perils and promises of spiritual life" is a great primer for anyone.

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Response to FreeState (Reply #8)

Fri Oct 5, 2012, 12:09 PM

17. I like Kornfield a lot...one of my other favorites is Rebel Buddha - Dzogchen Ponlop

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Response to Neoma (Original post)

Fri Jun 15, 2012, 12:32 AM

9. anything related to Bhuddadasa Bhikku will be rewarding.

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Response to Neoma (Original post)

Sat Jun 23, 2012, 06:04 PM

10. anything by Bhikkhu Bodhi.

He has translated all the discourses except the Numbered discourses. They are coming out in the fall. I recommend the introductory volume, In the Buddha's Words.

Others: The Buddha is Still Teaching:Contemporary Buddhist Wisdom, ed by Jack Kornfield

When Things fall Apart, by Pema Chodron

The Noble Eightfold Path, by Bhikkhu Bodhi

Awakening to the Sacred, Lama Surya Das

Daily wisdom, More Daily Wisdom, and Nightly wisdom, pub. by Wisdom Publications (www.wisdompubs.org)

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Response to Neoma (Original post)

Sun Jul 15, 2012, 11:59 AM

11. The Platform Sutra of Hui Neng, the Sixth Patriarch

 

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Response to Neoma (Original post)

Mon Jul 23, 2012, 08:26 PM

12. Being Peace

by Thich Nhat Hanh

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Response to Neoma (Original post)

Mon Aug 20, 2012, 07:19 AM

13. The Platform Sutra and The Diamond sutra are bound in one volume by Shambala Press

 

and the book is very reasonably priced.

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Response to Neoma (Original post)

Tue Aug 21, 2012, 08:37 PM

14. Another good one is Everyday Zen by Charlotte Joko Beck

I carry this one with me whenever I travel to keep me centered/balanced... it's easy to open to any page and immediately gain perspective.

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Response to Neoma (Original post)

Tue Oct 2, 2012, 04:49 PM

15. Tannisho: A Shin Buddhist Classic

I'm reading "Tannisho: A Shin Buddhist Classic" right now.

Here's an exerpt from Amazon.com.
By the way, I always buy my books (cheaper) at [link:http://www.abebooks.com/|AbeBooks.com
]
"Tannisho is a compilation of key sayings by the great medieval Japanese Buddhist teacher, Shinran Shonin (1173-1263 C.E.), who first promulgated Shin Buddhism. Tannisho is, one might say, the Shin Buddhist equivalent of the famous Dhammapada from the Pali canon. Shin Buddhism is the largest sect of Buddhism in Japan, and there is a fair number of temples in the denser population areas of USA, Canada and Europe. Tannisho dates from around 1300, or a few decades after Shinran's death."

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Response to Neoma (Original post)

Fri Oct 5, 2012, 11:57 AM

16. Here's a few I've enjoyed...

The Accidental Buddhist by Dinty Moore (no not the stew)
Start Where You Are by Pema Chodron
Against the Stream and Dharma Punx by Noah Levine
Stumbling Towards Enlightenment by Geri Larken

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Response to Neoma (Original post)

Fri Oct 12, 2012, 09:17 PM

18. The Buddha in Your Mirror..

various authors, and a forward by Herbie Hancock.

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Response to Neoma (Original post)

Mon Jan 28, 2013, 11:53 AM

19. If you are still looking for more Buddhist books

 

I would recommend the following:

Being and Becoming: Psychodynamics, Buddhism, and the Origins of Selfhood - Franklyn Sills

The Heart of Buddhist Meditation: Satipatthna: A Handbook of Mental Training Based on the Buddha's Way of Mindfulness - Thera Nyanaponika

The Four Foundations of Mindfulness - Venerable U Silananda

These three are a bit less well-known and popular, however, I have found them to be of great value.

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Response to Neoma (Original post)

Tue Feb 12, 2013, 05:37 AM

20. An Open Heart Practising Compassion in Everyday Life

I've just finished reading An Open Heart Practising Compassion in Everyday Life. Actually, I have read this book thrice. This book is amazing that tells about all the little good things in life and teaches the value of compassion and kindness. It always puts me at ease and brings me a lot of peace when I read it.

Here is an excerpt of this book from printsasia:

"When His Holiness the Dalai Lama came to New York City in 1999, he spoke simply and powerfully on the everyday Buddhist practice of compassion, and showed that the pathway to compassion is a series of meditations. An Open Heart lays out this course of meditations, from the simplest to the most challenging, describing the mental training techniques that will enable anyone of any Faith to change their minds and open their hearts. In this Book, the path begins with simple and clear ruminations on the advantages of virtuous life and moves on to practices that can temper destructive and impulsive emotions. Such practices can be undertaken at odd moments of the day, at once transforming the aimless or anxious mind into a disciplined and open mind. Gradually, the book introduces the more challenging and sustained Meditation practices. In these meditations the deepest and most profound insights of Buddhist practice become part of one's way of knowing and experiencing the world."

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Response to roberthespinosa (Reply #20)

Thu Feb 14, 2013, 01:15 AM

21. Welcome to DU, roberthespinosa!

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Response to Neoma (Original post)

Fri Feb 15, 2013, 07:25 PM

22. Pema Chodren was the first American Tibetan Nun. Easy reading, i think she

 

is the Foremost author of easily applicable Buddhist wisdom today for all levels of practitioners , definitely the widest spectrum of teachings. i started with a tape set of "When Things Fall Apart".. I was a hopeless alcoholic, I listened to it twice a day, also got her Tonglin books/tapes, and many other teachers. I began a dedicated meditation practice and study, I was in Texas, not many Buddhists. after 3 months I ran into a Tibetan Monk in his robes, he invited me to a Mandela disassembly, and later to join a Chenrezig Tibetan Buddhist Center. I am now sober 16 years, never had a craving, I never think about it. other authors are more subject specific.. not that that is bad, I have books from most the authors mentioned here.
http://www.amazon.com/s/ref=nb_sb_ss_c_0_4?url=search-alias%3Dstripbooks&field-keywords=pema%20chodron

depends on what you are looking for... technique, method, insight, inspiration.
book on meditation.. 'Diamond Mind' by Rob Narin and the best/most in depth is 'Buddhism With an Attitude', by B Allen Wallace http://www.amazon.com/Buddhism-Attitude-Tibetan-Seven-Point-Training/dp/1559392002/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1360973044&sr=1-1&keywords=buddhism+with+an+attitude

books by him, is the Dalia Lama's translator.. http://www.amazon.com/B.-Alan-Wallace/e/B001IGHPQ2/ref=ntt_athr_dp_pel_1

Buddhism is not a religion, it is simply a way to live without acquiring more bad Karma while you train your mind to focus and see/experience life in the present moment. the Heart Sutra is the primary document in the Mahayana Tradition. it describes the purpose of meditation.. to be able to perceive the world with no difference between Object and Subject. Buddhism is based on a single simple logical statement called the 4 Noble Truths

go to http://www.buddhanet.net [Theravada Buddhism] huge site, check out the Buddhanet Audio section, great way to sample teachers, great teachings,
Lama Zopa's site has great audio teachings too

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