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Mon May 13, 2019, 11:41 PM

Musanggae by Bo Hyun Seunim 무상게 ( 無常偈 ) 보현스님



Musanggae by Bo Hyun Seunim 무상게 ( 無常偈 ) 보현스님

1.
곱디 고운 베옷 입고 Dressed in lovely hemp clothes
꽃신 신고 가는 님아 And flowered shoes, My love leaves
이승의 짐 훌훌 벗고 Slips off the baggage of this world
고이 가소 정든 님아 And leaves peacefully, My beloved

사바고해 고통일랑 Bitter world of suffering and torment
한강물에 띄우고 In the Han River float away
지난 날 맺힌 한 Sorrows tied to past days
바람결에 흩날리고 Flutter away with the wind.

지장보살 영접받아 Jijangbosal (Ksitigarbha Bodhisattva) receives you
서방정토 왕생하여 Pass away to paradise
아미타불 친히 뵙고 You will meet Amitabha,
부디 성불 하고지고 Pray, to attain Buddhahood.
아아아 아아아 아아아 ah, ah, ah, ah...
부디 성불 하고지고 Pray to enter Nirvanna

2.
태산 준령 망망대해 High and steep mountains, open seas
세월 속에 변하는데 In the passage of time change
백년 한파 짧은 인생 A hundred years cold, short life.
생로 병사 면할 손가 Birth, infirmity, sickness and death, will one escape more loss?

부처님이 이르시되 Buddha said this
사대육신 허망하여 Human flesh and bones are vain
인연따라 태어났다 According to Nidana, you were born
인연따라 간다했소 According to Nidana, you passed away.

지장보살 영접받아 Jijangbosal (Ksitigarbha Bodhisattva) receives you
서방정토 왕생하여 Pass away to paradise
아미타불 친히 뵙고 You will meet Amitabha,
부디 성불 하고지고 Pray, to attain Buddhahood
아아아 아아아 아아아 ah, ah, ah...
부디 성불 하고지고 Pray, to attain Buddhahood

<<<<>>>卍──┼♧撫 仙
무상게 ( 無常偈 )
보현스님 Bo Hyun Seunim

(Source- https://www.lyrics.co.kr/?p=524646)

The English interpretation is my own, so liberties taken therein, and any errors are all mine.

5 replies, 427 views

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Reply Musanggae by Bo Hyun Seunim 무상게 ( 無常偈 ) 보현스님 (Original post)
soryang May 2019 OP
Tobin S. May 2019 #1
soryang May 2019 #2
Tobin S. May 2019 #3
soryang May 2019 #4
Tobin S. May 2019 #5

Response to soryang (Original post)

Tue May 14, 2019, 10:45 AM

1. Thank you. It's quite beautiful.

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Response to Tobin S. (Reply #1)

Tue May 14, 2019, 01:41 PM

2. My pleasure Tobin

It was very gratifying to discover this song in a Korean historical drama, although which one, I can't now remember from which the video clip on my prior post on Buddhist vocabulary originated. I am reminded of 인연, or synchronicity, in being brought to the point where I could attempt the translation.

I forgot to note the title Musanggae ( 무상계 無常戒 ) is teachings for the departed. I mentioned this in my first post that I've seen other Buddhist songs and chants on youtube with the same title but the content is different. I thought maybe it's a genre; I considered the subject "on impermanence." This particular song is also subtitled "the saddest song in the world."

Even since I heard this song, I've been interested in it. When I went to some of the other videos with the same title, there was one with a chant echoing in the mountains. Perhaps anyone who has gone to the mountains to see a Buddhist temple has had this experience.


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Response to soryang (Reply #2)

Tue May 14, 2019, 02:42 PM

3. If you don't mind me asking...

What is your background? I'm curious as to how you are so knowledgeable of Buddhism and these languages.

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Response to Tobin S. (Reply #3)

Tue May 14, 2019, 03:48 PM

4. a long time ago I was stationed in South Korea

Last edited Tue May 14, 2019, 05:33 PM - Edit history (1)

for almost three years. I took a couple of formal basic Korean courses. I traveled quite a bit as part of my job. It was very difficult to learn the language, and frankly I gave up for a long time, except for rudimentary communication like greetings, ordering food, and the like. The Army provided me with an interpreter when I went on the road. I still remember Mr. Shin, who told me I sounded like I was singing when I spoke Korean, because I used to memorize songs for the annual social get togethers with Korean officials.

About five years ago, I saw a web site I think promoted by the South Korean government called Talk to me in Korean, I did most of the lessons in there (free), and then I realized through contacts in the local Korean community (which is almost entirely Christian by the way) that South Korean television was freely available online. After watching many of those programs, for a few years since I retired, I became more proficient. I'm still not fluent, aural communication is the most difficult. I'd probably have to live in Korea for at least a few months if not longer to improve.

Anyway, I watch Korean news broadcasts, documentaries, and dramas on a daily basis. Much of the time I have to read the "chamak" or subtitles in hangul if the accents are too thick or I don't know the vocabulary. The subtitles are usually unreliable as well, especially if they are computer driven. I have a post up on the complexity and fluidity of the Korean vocabulary over on the languages and linguistics group, it's very challenging. I see one mistake I made on this translation, already.

When it comes to Buddhism, I am a neophyte. I read stuff by Alan Watts and DT Suzuki a long time ago and liked it quite a bit. I see the temple life on tv programming from time to time and take if for granted as part of the culture. It's part of a broad spectrum of Asian culture, that I think should be respected, and understood. I appreciate your interest and this Buddhist group.



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Response to soryang (Reply #4)

Wed May 15, 2019, 12:17 PM

5. Good deal. I look forward to your posts here.

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